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Glucophage (metformin) for PCOS?

hormones spiro

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#21 brenmc

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 08:11 AM

So, do you think perhaps increasing my spiro dose exacerbated the problem by further lowering my estrogen (keep in mind, I increased my dose in the first place because I was getting nodules after years of clear skin)? Should my estrogen go back to normal (or what it was) now that I've lowered my spiro or does it stay out of wack?
I use all natural toothpaste and have used two different brands since this resurgence of acne has started. What brand aggregated your acne?
The breakouts are on my chin, deep under the skin in hard, painful lumps (no head).
What's the difference between chiro-inositol and myo-inositol?
Thanks again!

Are the breakouts only on your chin? I used to get chin breakouts that I thought were hormonal, but they stopped once I switched my toothpaste and mouthwash. I was sensitive to some of the ingredients.
As for glucosmart, it's a good supplement. It contains chiro-inositol and I'm not sure if 600 mg are equal to higher doses of myo-inositol, which is what I'm taking. Are you still taking glucosmart? It seems like a good addition to spironolactone to help with weight gain and progesterone balance. 
In any case, you should get your hormones checked to see if maybe another hormone like estrogen is off because spironolactone doesn't help with estrogen dominance. It can lower your androgens to the point where your estrogen: testosterone ratio can become skewed in favor of estrogen. 



#22 brenmc

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 08:31 AM

I do try to avoid bad estrogens. I'm a vegetarian (though I occasionally eat wild-sourced fish), I do not even own a microwave, I'm on well water, and I try to eat only organic fruits and vegetables. However, perhaps now that I am 29, my hormones are changing in some way (though the frequency of the onset of the breakouts indicates more of a sudden change than a gradual one).
My period had been a little more frequent since I've had this issue too, (though its never been very regular) do you think that indicates a need for progesterone?
I think I will try progesterone cream, both you and hearts have said it didn't exacerbate your acne- which is obviously what I'm most worried about. Should I follow the dose guidelines on the bottle or start lower? Hearts takes it everyday, since my cycle is messed up, and I wouldn't be able to pin point the exact days of ovulation, should I just do that too? In Canada , you can't get progesterone cream without a 'script, I guess wild yam cream is useless?
I remember reading b vitamins impact progesterone, do you think taking that bcomplex is a good idea or bad?
Thank you!

Brenmc, I don't remember all the details about your story, but at this point I would probably try progesterone cream along with the spiro. Hormones do change as we age, so even if you're not old, you could just have low progesterone.
 
Low progesterone is pretty common in developed societies because we are exposed to xenoestrogens in the environment. Xenoestrogens are basically estrogen mimickers found in everything from plastics to pesticides to fabric softener. I know that sounds a little weird, that there are hormone mimickers in your Tupperware, but this is a real scientific thing, not just ranting from paranoid naturalists :)
 
Some people try to go au naturale and avoid all synthetics completely, but the truth is you really can't avoid all of them, and it's a little easier to take progesterone cream to deal with the estrogen overload...
 
I was taking progesterone cream concurrently with spiro for a while. I was already clear but did not get any new breakouts from the cream. I think it's worth a try for your situation.
 
If you really really don't want to try progesterone cream, you can take the harder route of just avoiding estrogen mimickers... 
 


Xeno literally means foreign, therefore xenoestrogens means foreign estrogens. Some of the 70,000 registered chemicals for use in the United States have hormonal effects in addition to toxic effects. The synergistic effects of exposure to many xenoestrogens are well documented, but largely unknown.  These substances can increase the estrogen load in the body over time, and are difficult to detoxify through the liver. This further compounds the problem of estrogen dominance.[/size]
 
To gain a perspective on how much exposure of chemicals is occurring, the NIH's National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have launched a study of blood and urine samples to determine the amount of exposure that Americans have to environmental estrogens.  The CDC will measure approximately 50 environmental estrogens in 200 persons to determine levels of exposure to the population.
 
Among the more familiar chemicals that will be tested for are: insecticides parathion and DDT and its metabolites; herbicides; fungicides; plant and fungal estrogens; and industrial chemicals such as cadmium, lead, mercury, PCBs and dioxins.
 
Byproducts of the plastic and pesticide industriescalled organochlorinesare one of the largest sources of xenoestrogens. These compounds, also used in dry cleaning, the bleaching of feminine hygiene products and the manufacture of plastics ranging from yogurt containers to baby bottles, have been shown to exert hormone-disrupting effects. What's more, organochlorines are known to accumulate in fatty human tissue and fluid such as breasts and breast milk. Caution dictates that women should try to eliminate these external estrogen sources through diet, supplements and lifestyle changes.
 
Plastics in our lives also expose us to the chemical bisphenol A, a breakdown product of polycarbonate, widely used in many plastics.  Bisphenol A, found in the lining of many food cans and juice containers, escapes when polycarbonate is subjected to high temperatures. The estrogenic effects of bisphenol A became clear when men working in the plastics industry developed breasts after chronically inhaling the chemical in dust.
 
Other bad news from scientists have suggested that environmental estrogens might be reducing sperm counts in men and causing breast cancer, fibroids, and other reproductive diseases in women. Xenoestrogens can be found in many of our meats and dairy products in the form of chemicals and growth hormones that are given to the animals.  These can be quite powerful, and should be avoided where possible.
The information below makes suggestions to avoid substances that contain xenoestrogens. These substances can increase the estrogen load in the body.Avoid all pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides. Wash your food well to rid the pesticides. Bathe the washed food in a produce wash or ozonated water for 20 minutes before cooking.

  • Have a good water filter for your source of water.
  • Use only organic based whole foods when you can. Buy hormone free meats and dairy products where possible.
  • Avoid plastic goods - they leach into the environment.
  • Do not microwave food in plastic containers, and especially avoid the use of plastic wrap to cover food for microwaving.
  • Use glass or ceramics whenever possible to store food.
  • Do not leave plastic containers, especially your drinking water, in the sun.
  • If a plastic water container has heated up significantly, throw it away - do not drink the water either.
  • Don't use fabric softeners as it puts petrochemicals right on your skin.
  • Use a simple laundry and dish detergent with less chemicals.
  • Use organic soaps and toothpastes. Avoid fluoride.
  • Avoid creams and cosmetics that have toxic chemicals and estrogenic ingredients such as parabens and stearal konium chloride. Switch to more natural products. Cheap brands usually have more toxic ingredients.
  • Avoid nail polish and nail polish removers.
  • Use only naturally based perfumes. Most perfumes are petrochemically based.
  • Avoid surfactants found in many condoms and diaphragm gels.
  • Avoid new carpet - it can give off noxious fumes.
  • Avoid X-rays as much as possible.
  • Be aware of noxious gas such as that from copiers and printers, carpets, fiberboards, etc. 

Edited by brenmc, 20 September 2013 - 08:33 AM.


#23 brenmc

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 09:11 AM

Also... To GreenGables, I don't eat dairy.
And to WishClean, I'm still on glucosmart.
Forgot to mention these points in my main reply.
Thank you so much for the advice ladies. My doctor is like 70, a male, and knows and cares nothing about these issues (it's nearly impossible to find a new doctor in my small town in Canada- had mine since I was a baby).

Edited by brenmc, 20 September 2013 - 09:12 AM.


#24 Green Gables

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 10:59 AM

You can get progesterone cream on Amazon.ca...several brands...are you sure you need a script?



#25 brenmc

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 11:05 AM

I called all the health food stores and compounding pharmacies in my town, they all said you need a prescription, except for for wild yam cream (that's available in health food stores). I was able to order Emerita on Amazon.ca today, but it will be awhile before it gets here. Is that a good brand? So, as as you know, taking spiro won't negatively impact using progesterone cream or vice versa?

You can get progesterone cream on Amazon.ca...several brands...are you sure you need a script?


Edited by brenmc, 20 September 2013 - 11:07 AM.


#26 WishClean

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 02:48 PM

So, do you think perhaps increasing my spiro dose exacerbated the problem by further lowering my estrogen (keep in mind, I increased my dose in the first place because I was getting nodules after years of clear skin)? Should my estrogen go back to normal (or what it was) now that I've lowered my spiro or does it stay out of wack?
I use all natural toothpaste and have used two different brands since this resurgence of acne has started. What brand aggregated your acne?
The breakouts are on my chin, deep under the skin in hard, painful lumps (no head).
What's the difference between chiro-inositol and myo-inositol?
Thanks again!

 

I think it's possible, but you won't know for sure until you get tested. If you can find a doctor in your area that specializes in bio-identical hormone therapy, they will tell you what the correct dose of progesterone cream would be for your specific needs if you choose to go that route. But as you said, if you live in a small town you might just have to rely on information from women who are using the cream currently. Hearts was lucky enough to figure out her imbalance without getting hormonal tests, and many women do a lot of trial and error until they figure out the right combination of supplements/creams. 

Many toothpaste brands aggravated my acne, including "natural" ones like toms of mayne (which actually isn't as natural as it claims). The worst was crest - both the toothpaste and the mouthwash. It caused redness all around my mouth and painful pimples. I was using sensodyne for a long time and it was fine, until I switched to their mint one and started breaking out again. I realized it might be the fluoride and peppermint, so I found a toothpaste without those ingredients (and without SLS), and switched to a tea tree mouthwash by desert essence and no breakouts for 2 months. Xylitol doesn't help me either, so it was difficult to find a natural toothpaste without xylitol but I eventually found one with baking soda, tea tree, and fennel. 

Chiro-inositol is more expensive and harder to find on its own, but it's more useful for women who have trouble breaking down myo-inositol into chiro-inositol. Chiro is supposed to work faster and in smaller quantities, but most of the studies I read on inositol and acne used regular myo-inositiol so I figured I'd start with that. I use the powder form. Natural sources of chiro-inositol include buckwheat and carob, which I try to eat regularly to get some chiro because I didn't want to pay $60 to order the supplements. 

Last time I tested my hormones I found out I had low progesterone and tried the cream (kokoro brand) for 2 months - greengables is very knowledgeable about hormonal balancing and gave me some tips on what to look for in a cream. Unfortunately, I couldn't stick to a regular application schedule, so I kind of gradually reduced it until I quit. It didn't aggravate my acne, and it helped me sleep better but I started getting numbness in my hands and feet every time I applied the cream to those areas, and I called the company to ask if this was a side effect and they recommended I stop using it to see if it would decrease the numbness. That was the main reason I stopped, but I'm still not sure if it was directly related to the cream because I've had problems with blood circulation before - it just happened to start during the time I started using progesterone, so I didn't want to risk it. I'm still getting numbness and tingling though, so I have to go see a neurologist for that but that's another story.

It's very important to stick to a regular, twice a day application schedule if you choose to use progesterone cream. I'm going with inositol for now because it helps with many areas. This is the info from the miscarriage website on the hormonal effects of inositol, also confirmed in clinical studies:

 

Clinical research has shown the following effects of inositol supplementation:
  • restores normal ovulatory activity
  • increases fertilization rate
  • prevents spina bifida birth defect
  • lowers free testosterone (research has shown up to a 73% reduction)
  • lowers total testosterone (as much as 65% reduction)
  • lowers LH (as much as 55% reduction)
  • lowers insulin response after meals (as much as 62% reduction)
  • lowers DHEA-S (as much as 49% reduction)
  • increases SHBG (as much as 92% increase)
  • lowers androstenedione  (as much as 27% reduction)
  • lowers triglycerides (as much as 51% reduction)
  • lowers blood pressure (minor decrease)
  • increases peak progesterone (129% increase in one study)

If you notice, there's no mention of estrogen here (neither in most other studies), but - as with progesterone creams - the idea is that once progesterone increases, the ratio of progesterone: estrogen will become more balanced and progesterone will aid in balancing all other hormones. So this is another alternative to using the progesterone cream in case you want to go off spironolactone and glucosmart at some point and just use one thing for everything. 

Btw, did you used to have increased body and facial hair before going on spiro? 


Edited by WishClean, 20 September 2013 - 02:54 PM.


#27 Green Gables

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 03:23 PM

I called all the health food stores and compounding pharmacies in my town, they all said you need a prescription, except for for wild yam cream (that's available in health food stores). I was able to order Emerita on Amazon.ca today, but it will be awhile before it gets here. Is that a good brand? So, as as you know, taking spiro won't negatively impact using progesterone cream or vice versa?

 

Emerita has is one of the most popular progesterone creams as they have been around for over 35 years. I haven't used it personally, but I'm fairly certain they know what they are doing. As far as ingredients go, it checks out.

 

When you use it, I would consider applying it to the labia rather than whatever the box recommends. 

 

  • Ideally, progesterone cream should NOT be applied to your skin. Instead use mucous epithelial membranes of your labia or rectum. Absorption through these membranes is more complete than through skin, and hormones absorbed through vaginal membranes enter the same pelvic plexus of veins that your ovaries normally empty into.

 

Most people recommend one dose in the morning and one at night. But I found that I could not handle progesterone cream during the day. It made me too drowsy. Sometimes you "get over" this effect with repeated use, but sometimes you don't. I switched to only an evening dose (which often put me right to sleep) so I could still function during the day. Just a heads up if you start feeling really tired...


Edited by Green Gables, 20 September 2013 - 03:25 PM.


#28 brenmc

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 04:11 PM

Thank you ladies!

WishClean, so I wonder if the glucosmart is managing my progesterone levels on it's own then? It is a pricey supplement but my mom pays for it because of the hell I went through with other medications over the years. I have blonde hair, so facial hair is not that noticeable, though I do occasionally get a random long one on my cheek or something (awkward). I do think glucosmart and spiro help with that though.
GreenGables, what do you think- would the glucosmart and progesterone be overboard or would they work together with spiro to help my acne? I've gone back to taking my spiro at night, I'm not sure if that will make a difference but, in retracing my steps, I've decided to go back to my prebreakout regimen in order to be sure there isn't something small I'm missing that could have been the catalyst for this (like time of day I take spiro). So would it be better to take the progesterone cream a few hours apart from the time I take spiro or does it matter? What do you think the impact, if any, of the bcomplex (I took and stopped) could be?

Edited by brenmc, 20 September 2013 - 05:31 PM.


#29 paigems

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 07:53 PM

I'm taking metformin right now for my PCOS and it works great for lowering my testosterone, but just ok for my skin. I do get less inflamed pimples on it, but the improvement is nothing like taking spiro which cleared my skin completely. I think, though, that I am going to have to stop taking the metformin because it is making my hair fall out. Spiro makes my hair fall out too so I feel like I can't win with any hormonal treatments :(

 

Have you guys heard of berberine? I'm considering trying it instead of metformin because of the hair loss. Here's some info I found:

 

http://www.naturalme...asp?article=387



#30 WishClean

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 11:34 PM

Thank you ladies!

WishClean, so I wonder if the glucosmart is managing my progesterone levels on it's own then? It is a pricey supplement but my mom pays for it because of the hell I went through with other medications over the years. I have blonde hair, so facial hair is not that noticeable, though I do occasionally get a random long one on my cheek or something (awkward). I do think glucosmart and spiro help with that though.
GreenGables, what do you think- would the glucosmart and progesterone be overboard or would they work together with spiro to help my acne? I've gone back to taking my spiro at night, I'm not sure if that will make a difference but, in retracing my steps, I've decided to go back to my prebreakout regimen in order to be sure there isn't something small I'm missing that could have been the catalyst for this (like time of day I take spiro). So would it be better to take the progesterone cream a few hours apart from the time I take spiro or does it matter? What do you think the impact, if any, of the bcomplex (I took and stopped) could be?

Well, it's hard to tell without getting tested to at least have an indication of whether your progesterone is still low or not. I read the product description on the Glucosmart website, and they are alleging that it "halts PCOS", which is definitely an exaggerated claim to make! Maybe it helps make PCOS more manageable, but I doubt there is a supplement or a drug that cures PCOS completely. Also, they are saying it's suitable for both men and women, so maybe the dosage of inositol is not that high so that men can use it too....I'm not sure. 

As for b-complexes, they usually give you more B12 and B6 than you need compared to all the other Bs, so it's best to get the Bs you need separately or from food. For some people, high amounts of B12 and B6 can aggravate acne. 

 

I'm taking metformin right now for my PCOS and it works great for lowering my testosterone, but just ok for my skin. I do get less inflamed pimples on it, but the improvement is nothing like taking spiro which cleared my skin completely. I think, though, that I am going to have to stop taking the metformin because it is making my hair fall out. Spiro makes my hair fall out too so I feel like I can't win with any hormonal treatments sad.png

 

Have you guys heard of berberine? I'm considering trying it instead of metformin because of the hair loss. Here's some info I found:

 

http://www.naturalme...asp?article=387

Hmm berberine sounds promising...the issue with the study you cited is that the participants were also receiving an antiandrogen  in a birth control pill (for both groups), so it's hard to say what the effects would be if berberine was taken on its own. 

My doctor told me that metformin can help with PCOS but will probably not entirely clear my skin, but I never tried it. If you want to see a study that compares the effects of inositol (what I'm taking) to metmorfin, check this out: http://www.naturalme...asp?article=326

When comparing the effects of metmorfin and inositol to ovulation (which many PCOS women have issues with, resulting to acne in some), this is what they found:

"In this study, myo-inositol offered a significant advantage over metformin in restoration of spontaneous ovulation in patients with PCOS. This also resulted in a non-significant increase in pregnancy rate. In addition, patients on myo-inositol reported no side effects during the course of treatment. Myo-inositol should be considered as a first-line treatment in patients with PCOS experiencing chronic anovulation or infertility secondary to anovulation."

Now, if a supplement can exceed the effects of a drug in terms of regulating ovulation, then it has potential for exceeding the benefits of metformin in other respects too. But of course, pharmaceutical companies don't want us to know this. There are some studies on its impact on acne as well. Some studies combine it with folic acid, but I discovered it works just as well on its own in powder form. 

Anyway, just another option for you to think about. 


Edited by WishClean, 20 September 2013 - 11:35 PM.


#31 paigems

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 10:27 AM

Hmm berberine sounds promising...the issue with the study you cited is that the participants were also receiving an antiandrogen  in a birth control pill (for both groups), so it's hard to say what the effects would be if berberine was taken on its own. 

 

 

My doctor told me that metformin can help with PCOS but will probably not entirely clear my skin, but I never tried it. If you want to see a study that compares the effects of inositol (what I'm taking) to metmorfin, check this out: http://www.naturalme...asp?article=326

When comparing the effects of metmorfin and inositol to ovulation (which many PCOS women have issues with, resulting to acne in some), this is what they found:

"In this study, myo-inositol offered a significant advantage over metformin in restoration of spontaneous ovulation in patients with PCOS. This also resulted in a non-significant increase in pregnancy rate. In addition, patients on myo-inositol reported no side effects during the course of treatment. Myo-inositol should be considered as a first-line treatment in patients with PCOS experiencing chronic anovulation or infertility secondary to anovulation."

Now, if a supplement can exceed the effects of a drug in terms of regulating ovulation, then it has potential for exceeding the benefits of metformin in other respects too. But of course, pharmaceutical companies don't want us to know this. There are some studies on its impact on acne as well. Some studies combine it with folic acid, but I discovered it works just as well on its own in powder form. 

Anyway, just another option for you to think about. 

Here's another article on berberine which shows comparable results to metformin

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2410097/

 

I have read about myo-inositol on a PCOS forum I also visit and I think it also sounds interesting. I might consider trying it in the future. I'm really scared of stopping the met though because my skin is in a very good place. I've lost about half my hair though sad.png

 

Do you notice any skin benefits from the myo-inositol?


Edited by paigems, 21 September 2013 - 10:28 AM.


#32 WishClean

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 11:59 AM

That's very interesting. And it just goes to show that we don't need to resort to drugs because supplements can work just as well. My doctor wants me to exhaust all natural options before prescribing anything, and that's what I'm doing. 

If you are losing your hair, then obviously the met is setting some of your other hormones off balance. I would say maybe biotin supplements or l-cysteine could help (if you check the B5 hair loss thread, you will find more suggestions that may apply to you), but the logical thing would be to stop taking what's causing the hairloss, or maybe decrease the dosage? Maybe it's too strong for you? What did your doctor say?

I've only been taking inositol for 3 weeks, and I'm also taking a high dosage of D2 prescribed by my doctor, so I think they are both helping with skin texture and reduction of acne. I haven't noticed any hair loss, I think my hair looks healthier but again, it could also be the vit. D. When I added inositol, I was taking a low dose and this week I upped it a bit more and noticed that any breakouts I get take less time to heal. But it's a bit too early to tell. The studies I read saw results from anywhere between 8 weeks to 3 months. 



#33 brenmc

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 10:02 PM

Thanks WishClean, I totally agree, over exaggerated claims on supplements can be highly suspect. :-S
I hope things straighten out soon; I've ordered some progesterone cream but it takes up to three weeks for delivery. And my chin is really sore :(.

#34 Green Gables

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 09:47 PM

Thank you ladies!

WishClean, so I wonder if the glucosmart is managing my progesterone levels on it's own then? It is a pricey supplement but my mom pays for it because of the hell I went through with other medications over the years. I have blonde hair, so facial hair is not that noticeable, though I do occasionally get a random long one on my cheek or something (awkward). I do think glucosmart and spiro help with that though.
GreenGables, what do you think- would the glucosmart and progesterone be overboard or would they work together with spiro to help my acne? I've gone back to taking my spiro at night, I'm not sure if that will make a difference but, in retracing my steps, I've decided to go back to my prebreakout regimen in order to be sure there isn't something small I'm missing that could have been the catalyst for this (like time of day I take spiro). So would it be better to take the progesterone cream a few hours apart from the time I take spiro or does it matter? What do you think the impact, if any, of the bcomplex (I took and stopped) could be?

 

I took spiro with breakfast, and then with lunch. I took progesterone before I went to sleep. So they were definitely hours apart. Who's to say if it actually makes a difference, but I figure the body can only handle so much at a one time. 



I'm taking metformin right now for my PCOS and it works great for lowering my testosterone, but just ok for my skin. I do get less inflamed pimples on it, but the improvement is nothing like taking spiro which cleared my skin completely. I think, though, that I am going to have to stop taking the metformin because it is making my hair fall out. Spiro makes my hair fall out too so I feel like I can't win with any hormonal treatments sad.png

 

Have you guys heard of berberine? I'm considering trying it instead of metformin because of the hair loss. Here's some info I found:

 

http://www.naturalme...asp?article=387

 

What's funny is that on spiro my hair is thinner on my head, overall, but my hairline has changed slightly. I don't know what to call them, but you know those Vs on the temples at a lot of people have? Mine were kind of far back before spiro....almost resembling a guy just starting to bald. Even though I have less hair overall, those Vs are smaller now, more hair has grown in those places. 

 

From what I've read, less hair overall on the scalp is more of a "female" trait. We think when we're losing hair we're balding and something is wrong. Balding is actually correlated more to a specific pattern of hair loss (on the crown of the head, and those V shapes on the temple). But balding men, with high testosterone, will actually have more hair on other parts of their head, and then have no hair in the specific balding spots.

 

Does that make sense?

 

Not to underwhelm any hair loss you had. Just wanted to let you know that it is fairly normal to have less "overall" hair, body AND scalp, when your testosterone goes down. But if you had any "balding" spots, those would have gotten better at the same time. 



#35 brenmc

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 02:59 PM

Thanks GreenGables.

#36 paigems

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 07:20 PM

 

What's funny is that on spiro my hair is thinner on my head, overall, but my hairline has changed slightly. I don't know what to call them, but you know those Vs on the temples at a lot of people have? Mine were kind of far back before spiro....almost resembling a guy just starting to bald. Even though I have less hair overall, those Vs are smaller now, more hair has grown in those places. 

From what I've read, less hair overall on the scalp is more of a "female" trait. We think when we're losing hair we're balding and something is wrong. Balding is actually correlated more to a specific pattern of hair loss (on the crown of the head, and those V shapes on the temple). But balding men, with high testosterone, will actually have more hair on other parts of their head, and then have no hair in the specific balding spots.

 

Does that make sense?

 

Not to underwhelm any hair loss you had. Just wanted to let you know that it is fairly normal to have less "overall" hair, body AND scalp, when your testosterone goes down. But if you had any "balding" spots, those would have gotten better at the same time. 

 

I understand what you're saying. However, in my case my hair loss isn't normal. No one in my family has hair as thin as mine right now and the part in my hair looks abnormally sparse. I've been doing some research into why metformin might give me this side effect, and all I've been able to find is that it is an aromatase inhibitor which might cause hair loss. Unfortunately the berberine I was going to try is also an aromatase inhibitor -_-



#37 WishClean

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 04:16 PM

@ paigems...hair loss is a risk whenever we try to regulate our hormones using synthetic drugs, or even herbs and supplements (there's a massive thread on B5 hairloss from people who megadosed on it).  I would say, if you choose to replace metformin with berberine, the hairloss -- and also the blockage of aromatase -- will probably lessen because on its own, it seems to be a bit weaker than metformin but could be just as effective in terms of the positives. 

The inositol I'm taking is supposed to inhibit aromatase too, among other things, but I haven't noticed any more hair shedding than usual. Whenever I have tried to regulate my PCOS - whether by birth control, antiandrogens, herbs -- I always seem to get some hair shedding. 

It sucks that we try to fix one issue and then another issue emerges saywhat.gif



#38 paigems

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 04:37 PM

@ paigems...hair loss is a risk whenever we try to regulate our hormones using synthetic drugs, or even herbs and supplements (there's a massive thread on B5 hairloss from people who megadosed on it).  I would say, if you choose to replace metformin with berberine, the hairloss -- and also the blockage of aromatase -- will probably lessen because on its own, it seems to be a bit weaker than metformin but could be just as effective in terms of the positives. 

The inositol I'm taking is supposed to inhibit aromatase too, among other things, but I haven't noticed any more hair shedding than usual. Whenever I have tried to regulate my PCOS - whether by birth control, antiandrogens, herbs -- I always seem to get some hair shedding. 

It sucks that we try to fix one issue and then another issue emerges saywhat.gif

 

I agree it does suck! Thankfully birth control doesn't cause my hair to shed. Keep us updated on your experience with inositol please :)



#39 WishClean

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 04:43 PM

@ paigems...hair loss is a risk whenever we try to regulate our hormones using synthetic drugs, or even herbs and supplements (there's a massive thread on B5 hairloss from people who megadosed on it).  I would say, if you choose to replace metformin with berberine, the hairloss -- and also the blockage of aromatase -- will probably lessen because on its own, it seems to be a bit weaker than metformin but could be just as effective in terms of the positives. 

The inositol I'm taking is supposed to inhibit aromatase too, among other things, but I haven't noticed any more hair shedding than usual. Whenever I have tried to regulate my PCOS - whether by birth control, antiandrogens, herbs -- I always seem to get some hair shedding. 

It sucks that we try to fix one issue and then another issue emerges saywhat.gif

 

I agree it does suck! Thankfully birth control doesn't cause my hair to shed. Keep us updated on your experience with inositol please smile.png

I actually just updated on heart's thread... here: http://www.acne.org/...aturally/page-2

Inositol has given me promising results so far in such a short amount of time and low dosage...I thought my hormones were so messed up because they haven't been responding to things that used to work for me in the past. Anyway, read my update and let me know what you think! It's not just my skin that's improving, it's other symptoms too. 






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