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Zag Enzyme, Lectins, Digestive Tract And Clogged Pores

digestion gut permeability lectins soaking garlic zinc gluten vegetarian

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#61 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 03:11 PM

If you google mono and oligosaccarides for lectins you get a lot of responses, most of which aren't comprehensible via quick skimming.

On this one there's a chart with some lectins and their binding
Lectins and Specificity
http://www.galab.de/...pecificity.html

Another link:
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC1949895/

#62 AussieSmile

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 05:54 PM

I know this was said before but have you tried N-A-C to test this theory alternativista?

#63 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 07:40 PM

QUOTE (AussieSmile @ Jan 26 2010, 05:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know this was said before but have you tried N-A-C to test this theory alternativista?


No, I haven't tried any supplements for this. I do eat a lot of sulfur containing foods though.

Edited by alternativista, 26 January 2010 - 07:58 PM.


#64 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 08:11 PM

QUOTE (LiliVG @ Jan 25 2010, 09:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Quanta2998 @ Jan 25 2010, 06:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
FYI, there is a supplement called Lectin Lock that contains the whole lot of the items that are supposed to be effective at suppressing Lectin. Never tried it myself but if anyone wants to be a guinea pig, go ahead badgrin.gif


Oh, that's interesting, thanks for the info! smile.gif


There's also this 'Deflect' line with a different formula for each blood type. Some have NAC and NAG and some don't.


#65 Chris-6

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 03:06 PM

is there more information of foods with highest levels that we should avoid? and legumes/grains with lower levels?

i think
i understand that lima beans + white rice are low in lectins and peanuts, soy beans, wheat, and kidney beans are high in lectins.


why are lectins in dairy products? do the lectins in the feed transfer to the milk? are lectins in 100% grassfed milk? or goat milk products?

what about butter- if lectins are proteins then butter should be a low lectin food?




#66 acne_combat

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 06:28 PM

A really interesting text I came across (http://www.vrp.com/a...art2009&zTYPE=2):
QUOTE
Certain seaweeds, especially those high in the sugar fucose (Bladderwrack) and mucilaginous vegetables like okra have the ability to bind to lectins in a way that makes them unavailable to the vulnerable cells of the gut. These foods act as sacrificial decoys and attach to the problematic lectins that would ordinarily attach and bind to gut epithelial cells. A specific glycoprotein, N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), is also a favorite target for dietary lectins and is concentrated in connective tissue. Supplementation with NAG is an excellent strategy for lectin protection. Another sugar with similar activity is D-mannose, which is capable of binding to lectins located on the cells of microorganisms. Some bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections contain lectins specific for the sugar mannose and use these lectins to bind tightly to mannose-rich tissue in the bladder walls, initiating urinary tract infections (UTIs). 28 As with Bladderwrack and NAG, supplementation with D-mannose provides a decoy for these lectins and protects the bladder. Supplementing prior to a meal with these decoy sugars allows for the binding of potentially harmful lectins and protection from attack. This concept of lectin-shielding devices has exciting clinical application now and in the future.


seems very promising biggrin.gif

Bladderwrack supplements are very cheap
D-Mannose supps more expensive, but still very affordable
Fresh okras are unfortunately hard to find where I am
And where is NAG found? Is it a prescription drug?

Edited by acne_combat, 27 January 2010 - 06:35 PM.


#67 alternativista

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 09:49 PM

QUOTE (Chris-6 @ Jan 27 2010, 03:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
is there more information of foods with highest levels that we should avoid? and legumes/grains with lower levels?


Here's a report on that. And there was another link with lectin content of foods posted in the first or 2nd page:

http://www.pjbs.org/...ine/fin1120.pdf

Which includes the claim:
QUOTE
Protecting against lectins: Because lectins are so
prevalent in a typical diet, undertaking a supplement
regimen to help combat the damaging effects of lectins
can help contribute to optimal health, improve the health
of the intestinal tract and contribute to weight loss.
Certain seaweeds, especially those high in the sugar
fucose and mucilaginous vegetables like okra
have the
ability to bind to lectins in a way that makes them
unavailable to the vulnerable cells of the gut. These
foods act as sacrificial decoys and attach to the
problematic lectins that would ordinarily attach and
bind to gut epithelial cells.
The paragraph is primarily about supplements and goes on to name many that we've already talked about like NAG.

Edited by alternativista, 09 May 2011 - 11:17 AM.


#68 venam

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 09:55 PM

QUOTE (alternativista @ Jan 27 2010, 10:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Chris-6 @ Jan 27 2010, 03:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
is there more information of foods with highest levels that we should avoid? and legumes/grains with lower levels?


Here's a report on that. And there was another link with lectin content of foods poster in the first or 2nd page:

http://www.pjbs.org/...ine/fin1120.pdf

So that other people know, a paleo diet avoids most lectins (might have some in nuts). Cordain and others makes a big deal about this.

#69 alternativista

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 09:58 PM

QUOTE (acne_combat @ Jan 27 2010, 06:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A really interesting text I came across (http://www.vrp.com/articles.aspx?ProdID=art2009&zTYPE=2):
QUOTE
Certain seaweeds, especially those high in the sugar fucose (Bladderwrack) and mucilaginous vegetables like okra have the ability to bind to lectins in a way that makes them unavailable to the vulnerable cells of the gut. These foods act as sacrificial decoys and attach to the problematic lectins that would ordinarily attach and bind to gut epithelial cells. A specific glycoprotein, N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), is also a favorite target for dietary lectins and is concentrated in connective tissue. Supplementation with NAG is an excellent strategy for lectin protection. Another sugar with similar activity is D-mannose, which is capable of binding to lectins located on the cells of microorganisms. Some bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections contain lectins specific for the sugar mannose and use these lectins to bind tightly to mannose-rich tissue in the bladder walls, initiating urinary tract infections (UTIs). 28 As with Bladderwrack and NAG, supplementation with D-mannose provides a decoy for these lectins and protects the bladder. Supplementing prior to a meal with these decoy sugars allows for the binding of potentially harmful lectins and protection from attack. This concept of lectin-shielding devices has exciting clinical application now and in the future.


seems very promising biggrin.gif

Bladderwrack supplements are very cheap
D-Mannose supps more expensive, but still very affordable
Fresh okras are unfortunately hard to find where I am
And where is NAG found? Is it a prescription drug?


The report I just posted lists the foods high in lectins and names the sugar that binds them. Glucosamine is a commonly available supplement.

Okra is common here, but I also have a plant that I was told was a vining summer Spinach that is very mucilaginous. Which is why I never did anything with it except throw it into smoothies or cooked legumes. It's often called malabar spinach. I bring it up because it's a very pretty plant and easy to grow. Also, purslane is a common weed that mucilaginous, nutritious and has a citrusy flavor.

Prickly pear cactus is mucilaginous.

Edited by alternativista, 14 December 2010 - 03:53 PM.


#70 LiliVG

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 10:19 PM

There's a product called "Lectin Lock" that has all those sugars in it.

#71 alternativista

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 10:32 PM

QUOTE (LiliVG @ Jan 27 2010, 10:19 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There's a product called "Lectin Lock" that has all those sugars in it.


Yes and another one that was posted here earlier that has them too, but the formula is different for each blood type.

Here's a lectin related blog post:
http://wholehealthso...ns-part-ii.html


#72 alternativista

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 10:34 PM

QUOTE (venam @ Jan 27 2010, 09:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (alternativista @ Jan 27 2010, 10:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Chris-6 @ Jan 27 2010, 03:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
is there more information of foods with highest levels that we should avoid? and legumes/grains with lower levels?


Here's a report on that. And there was another link with lectin content of foods poster in the first or 2nd page:

http://www.pjbs.org/...ine/fin1120.pdf

So that other people know, a paleo diet avoids most lectins (might have some in nuts). Cordain and others makes a big deal about this.


There are lectins in all foods, so that's not quite right. However, since it avoids legumes and grains, it avoids most of the foods highest in lectins.


#73 venam

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 11:48 PM

QUOTE (alternativista @ Jan 27 2010, 11:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (venam @ Jan 27 2010, 09:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (alternativista @ Jan 27 2010, 10:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Chris-6 @ Jan 27 2010, 03:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
is there more information of foods with highest levels that we should avoid? and legumes/grains with lower levels?


Here's a report on that. And there was another link with lectin content of foods poster in the first or 2nd page:

http://www.pjbs.org/...ine/fin1120.pdf

So that other people know, a paleo diet avoids most lectins (might have some in nuts). Cordain and others makes a big deal about this.


There are lectins in all foods, so that's not quite right. However, since it avoids legumes and grains, it avoids most of the foods highest in lectins.

That's why I said most lectins. Compare a paleo diet to any other diet and you will see a tremendous difference in the lectin content. Apart from that, the lectins that do exists are normally not as harmful as those in non-paleo foods.

Of course, you don't have to be paleo to eat a "low-lectin" diet, proper processing (fermenting, soaking, etc) and avoiding certain foods that are most resistant to processing will probably go a long way. smile.gif

Edited by venam, 27 January 2010 - 11:54 PM.


#74 acne_combat

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 01:09 PM

So, if fermenting is good against lectins, then beer should be low in lectins, even if it contains grains. Is this assumption correct?

#75 nowash

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 01:55 PM

The thing with fermentation (at least with wheat) is that you need bacteria to reduce lectin damage. You're not really reducing the lectins in wheat per se, you're just giving them something to bind to so they don't bind to cells inside your body. In other words, you inhibit them. The thing with beer is that every manufacturer uses brewer's yeast, which is a fungi.

Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, the lectin) binds with N-acetylglucosamine, which is present in bacteria cell walls. This could explain why some gluten or wheat intolerant people can tolerate traditional sourdough breads, as well as why supplements of N-acetylglucosamine reduce arthritis pain in some people (EDIT: it's glucosamine salt supplements for arthritis, not NAG, my bad eusa_doh.gif). It also could explain why leaven breads appeared in history, and perhaps why white flour was desired so much by the elite, aside from the rancidity factor. Regarding the insulin theory of acne, it explains why sourdough bread has a lower insulin index. WGA is insulinotropic, thus inhibiting it will inhibit its effects on your pancreas.

If people want to still try eating something that resembles good bread, I suggest traditional leavening and then using spelt instead of wheat. Apparently modern wheat is grown so that it contains more protein (lectins are proteins) compared to ancient, and spelt supposedly contains less protein. Either that or use white cake flour, perhaps. The longer the fermentation the better.

Edited by nowash, 28 January 2010 - 02:55 PM.


#76 venam

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 02:03 PM

QUOTE (acne_combat @ Jan 28 2010, 02:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So, if fermenting is good against lectins, then beer should be low in lectins, even if it contains grains. Is this assumption correct?

Gluten is particularly tough and survives long fermentation. I was referring more to this type of food:

http://wholehealthso...d-ix-idlis.html

Moreover industrial fermentation is not the same as traditional fermentation (look at breads!).

#77 Dotty1

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 11:10 AM

So lectins = bad?

I just read on wiki that aloe vera has lectins in it.

#78 Brissyguy

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Posted 01 February 2010 - 08:31 PM

I soaked some nuts last nut (almonds, brazil nuts and walnuts) and the water turned brown and disgusting and I can actually see small particles. I"m going to dry them with a fan and then on a low heat roast them for a few minutes.

1. Do you guys eat them straight away?
2. How long do you store them for?

Virastop has proteases right? This could be helpful. Or else, what other digestive enzyme supplements are people taking?

#79 alternativista

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 10:43 AM

QUOTE (Brissyguy @ Feb 1 2010, 08:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I soaked some nuts last nut (almonds, brazil nuts and walnuts) and the water turned brown and disgusting and I can actually see small particles. I"m going to dry them with a fan and then on a low heat roast them for a few minutes.

1. Do you guys eat them straight away?
2. How long do you store them for?

Virastop has proteases right? This could be helpful. Or else, what other digestive enzyme supplements are people taking?


You should rinse them a few times during the soaking process. See the links for information in previous posts. And there've been some other supplements named in previous posts.

#80 alternativista

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 11:54 AM

This study on complementary foods is about phytates, but that's another thing we are trying to eliminate with traditional methods like soaking, sprouting and fermenting.

http://www3.intersci...l...=1&SRETRY=0

Rye, wheat, and buckwheat are high in phytase so adding them to low phytase foods like oats aids in reducing phytates. But you need to use buckwheat or rye that has not been heat treated or the enzymes will be dead, so you can't use kasha or toasted buckwheat for example.

And on that note, you would need to ferment anything that's been heated, such as most oatmeal and other flakes. Whole foods sells barley and rye flakes, but I have no idea how they are made.

Edited by alternativista, 02 February 2010 - 02:07 PM.





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