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Zag Enzyme, Lectins, Digestive Tract And Clogged Pores

digestion gut permeability lectins soaking garlic zinc gluten vegetarian

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#41 Drizzler

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 10:39 AM

QUOTE (tigermike @ Nov 12 2009, 01:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (venam @ Nov 11 2009, 11:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
About potatoes, white potato is a nightshade (yep) so it is loaded with lectins. I remember reading something else about white potatoe that it has another compound which is really bad, can't remember so just dismiss that.


When potatoes are fried (french fries, chips) there is something called acrylamide which is cancer-causing. And of course there's always that sneaky trans fat.

Is that what you were thinking of?



Or perhaps the toxic solanine found in all species in the family Solanaceae (AKA nightshades). Any green parts on a potato are toxic. And eggplant has a lot of it too. I've wondered if tomatoes that are picked green and artificially ripened are an issue in that regard as well...

Edited by Drizzler, 12 November 2009 - 10:44 AM.


#42 venam

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 12:30 PM

QUOTE (tigermike @ Nov 12 2009, 02:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (venam @ Nov 11 2009, 11:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
About potatoes, white potato is a nightshade (yep) so it is loaded with lectins. I remember reading something else about white potatoe that it has another compound which is really bad, can't remember so just dismiss that.


When potatoes are fried (french fries, chips) there is something called acrylamide which is cancer-causing. And of course there's always that sneaky trans fat.

Is that what you were thinking of?

No, is a component of white potatoes that is not dependent on cooking method.

I actually remember now, potatoes contain lectins AND glycoalkaloids. As you can read here most nightshades have them, so sweet potatoes, yams, and other tubers won't contain glycoalkaloids.

#43 alternativista

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 03:02 PM

QUOTE (venam @ Nov 11 2009, 10:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Soaking and cooking take away enough lectins to make it edible, but they still have plenty afterward.


You need to drain the soaking liquid and rinse as well. The instructions I've found for soaking nuts and seeds tells you to drain and rinse several times during the soaking time.

Also, some beans have more than others. One of the sources I linked to in my first few posts named soy and kidney beans as among the worst. And broad beans, not so much. Broad beans include about a 100 varieties of lima bean. And if you soak and cook them yourself with a lot of garlic, they are delicious. Nothing like those nasty things you were served in your school cafeteria or by your parents. I've been eating giant Peruvian lima beans which are really good and so much faster to sort through for bad beans or pebbles because they such big white beans.


#44 Packerfan785

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 12:27 PM

"As for beans, most bean dishes you buy are not soaked at all. Soaking will only happen if you cook them yourself and soak them. Soaking and cooking take away enough lectins to make it edible, but they still have plenty afterward."

What about beans in a can which are soaking in water, and then cooked and put in chili which is reheated?

Don't you think that would be enough to dramatically lower the lectin content?

#45 alternativista

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 02:34 PM

QUOTE (Packerfan785 @ Nov 13 2009, 12:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What about beans in a can which are soaking in water, and then cooked and put in chili which is reheated?

Don't you think that would be enough to dramatically lower the lectin content?


No, canned beans are cooked, probably in a pressure cooker. They need to be soaked raw and at a temperature that doesn't destroy the necessary enzymes.

#46 Drizzler

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 10:31 AM

http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

I now see that you posted that already, so nm.

Edited by Drizzler, 16 November 2009 - 10:32 AM.


#47 alternativista

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 11:10 AM

Dr. Oz, who is from Turkey, keeps mentioning that when he was growing up his parents gave him soaked nuts like walnuts and almonds for snacks. So apparently it has been the tradition there.

#48 venam

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 03:23 PM

Just to add to the discussion:

Fermentation is the best way to remove lectins from rice (and many other grains), but for those that want to eat rice whole (without grinding) there is a simple way that uses fermentation without changing the texture:

http://wholehealthso...brown-rice.html

#49 rentstuff

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 04:46 PM

THIS HAS TO BE part OF THE TOP 5 threads of all time in acne.org
AMAZING THREAD!

Have you tried N-A-G to try the theory? I only wish Cordain's ZAG was available in supps lol

#50 acne_combat

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 09:28 AM

QUOTE (rentstuff @ Jan 24 2010, 04:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
THIS HAS TO BE part OF THE TOP 5 threads of all time in acne.org
AMAZING THREAD!

Have you tried N-A-G to try the theory? I only wish Cordain's ZAG was available in supps lol


I agree!
Did anybody try anything related to this theory with results? Alernativista?
Avoiding all the lectins-containing food is just a like a slightly modified candida-diet... Eggs seem to be listed too, but they are essential when you don't have carbs, or should they be cut out too?

#51 LiliVG

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 12:48 PM

This is really interesting because I had done a lot of research on the process that causes pimples, and the one missing piece I couldn't find was the enzyme that causes the skin to shed. The furthest I could get was finding that in acne, that enzyme that releases the dead skin cell isn't working properly, but they didn't know which enzyme it was at that time, and they didn't know why it wasn't working as it should. So this is great information.

This also addresses perhaps why the ViraStop has been working. Lectins are a protein, and ViraStop dissolves protein, thereby removing it and not allowing it to inhibit that shedding enzyme process. This also explains why the flakiness on my face has been going down as well since I started taking it.

The one question I had was, western countries are not the only societies that consume lectins. However, lectins bind to carbohydrates, something that the western society is far and above more than bountiful in. We have plenty of carbohydrates for lectins to bind to. I also understand that fermentation is something much more common in developing countries than in western societies, so that addresses that as well. So generally, western societies consume far more lectins, AND far more carbohydrates on average. It's a rather nasty combination I guess.

It's definitely something to think about, and I am grateful for this missing piece of the puzzle, I've been waiting a few years to find it.

#52 LiliVG

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 01:49 PM

lol, I found some information about ZAG. It is also found in sperm, which may explain some women saying that using their boyfriend/husband's sperm as a face mask gave them beautiful skin. lol.gif Here's an example: http://www.acne.org/...cne-t95048.html

Edited by LiliVG, 25 January 2010 - 01:54 PM.


#53 Quanta2998

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 08:58 PM

FYI, there is a supplement called Lectin Lock that contains the whole lot of the items that are supposed to be effective at suppressing Lectin. Never tried it myself but if anyone wants to be a guinea pig, go ahead badgrin.gif

#54 LiliVG

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 09:04 PM

QUOTE (Quanta2998 @ Jan 25 2010, 06:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
FYI, there is a supplement called Lectin Lock that contains the whole lot of the items that are supposed to be effective at suppressing Lectin. Never tried it myself but if anyone wants to be a guinea pig, go ahead badgrin.gif


Oh, that's interesting, thanks for the info! smile.gif

#55 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 12:08 PM

QUOTE (acne_combat @ Jan 25 2010, 09:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Avoiding all the lectins-containing food is just a like a slightly modified candida-diet... Eggs seem to be listed too, but they are essential when you don't have carbs, or should they be cut out too?


Yes, some of the articles mention that as well as pointing out that the most common allergenic foods are the ones highest in lectins. And what candida diets and avoiding allergens are really doing is avoiding lectins.



#56 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 12:27 PM

QUOTE (LiliVG @ Jan 25 2010, 12:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
This is really interesting because I had done a lot of research on the process that causes pimples, and the one missing piece I couldn't find was the enzyme that causes the skin to shed. The furthest I could get was finding that in acne, that enzyme that releases the dead skin cell isn't working properly, but they didn't know which enzyme it was at that time, and they didn't know why it wasn't working as it should. So this is great information.

This also addresses perhaps why the ViraStop has been working. Lectins are a protein, and ViraStop dissolves protein,


Yeah, I've read a few times that protease enzymes taken on an empty stomach will go in to the blood stream to attack things like viruses, bacteria, and proteins that don't belong, like with virastop.

Different enzymes and what they breakdown:
http://www.enzymedica.com/enzyme_specialists.php

One of the articles I linked to in my earlier posts named some enzymes and specific carbs that affect specific lectins such as Glucosamine for wheat lectin. I think plants tend to contain whatever is needed to break them down, but in seeds it's locked up until conditions are right for sprouting which means moisture which is why they need to be soaked or fermented and it has been the tradition to soak them until recently with our rapid rise yeasted breads and cooked without soaking canned beans. Not to mention the tendency to kill everything with heat so the enzymes are destroyed.

Be sure to see this thread on lectins in wheat which affect insulin and N-acetyl glucosamine:
http://www.acne.org/...e...&hl=lectins

When I run out of my giant bottle of MSM, I plan to switch to an MSM/glucosamine. My skin has been clear of inflamed acne for a while, but I get keratosis pilaris, which has worsened since I first cleared my skin via diet. I guess my diet has become not strict enough. And starting last summer, my back hasn't been free of some kind small, non-inflamed acne and blackheads. I don't know what since I can't see it, but my skin isn't smooth.

Edited by alternativista, 13 July 2010 - 09:05 AM.


#57 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 01:29 PM

This is a good article on lectins and their inflammatory effects including how those in wheat which can bind to insulin receptors and trigger fat storage. Allergies and arthritis are also mentioned.

http://www.vrp.com/a...art2009&zTYPE=2

They mention that many ancient forms of wheat and other grains had a lower protein content, which means fewer lectins. Spelt is an example.

Edited by alternativista, 04 February 2010 - 05:59 PM.


#58 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 02:30 PM

Another interesting article on the problem with lectins. It mentions the IgA anti-body, which I'd read several times before that it's that antibody involved in wheat or gluten intolerance. And the mucin that lines your digestive tract.

http://www.totalheal...-trouble-maker/

QUOTE
The answer lies in the balance of gut flora and a person’s immune system. When you have adequate beneficial flora, it serves as a protective barrier against substances that travel through the intestines, including lectins. But importantly, beneficial flora are needed to keep the production going in the intestines of two lectin-protective substances, mucin and secretory IgA.3,4

Mucin, like lectin, is a glycoprotein in the mucous lining of the intestines. When lectins travel through the intestines, they should have mucin to bind to, rather than intestinal cells. But if mucin is missing, lectins will bind to intestinal cells instead. Secretory IgA also binds to lectins, preventing them from causing damage.5

If you have any lectin-related health issues like arthritis, allergies or autoimmune disease, our experience shows it is very helpful to reduce your intake of lectins, especially from wheat. It’s also very important to balance immunity by working on stress management and gut health.

By taking a good quality probiotic you’ll help stimulate adequate mucin and secretory IgA production.3,4 And controlling your stress response will help prevent the over production of IgA and maintain immune balance in the gut to improve your tolerance to lectins.

Edited by alternativista, 27 July 2012 - 09:23 AM.


#59 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 02:36 PM

QUOTE (acne_combat @ Jan 25 2010, 09:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Did anybody try anything related to this theory with results? Alernativista?
Avoiding all the lectins-containing food is just a like a slightly modified candida-diet... Eggs seem to be listed too, but they are essential when you don't have carbs, or should they be cut out too?


No, other than taking even more steps to avoid/reduce lectins. Try to get eggs from free roaming hens, which hopefully get more of their diet from greens and insects like they are meant to.

#60 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 02:38 PM

QUOTE (LiliVG @ Jan 25 2010, 12:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The furthest I could get was finding that in acne, that enzyme that releases the dead skin cell isn't working properly, but they didn't know which enzyme it was at that time, and they didn't know why it wasn't working as it should.


That's funny because I think it's always been part of Cordain's acne theory and one of the reasons he thinks grains are evil. That study I found was from 2000.

Edited by alternativista, 26 January 2010 - 02:44 PM.





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