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Zag Enzyme, Lectins, Digestive Tract And Clogged Pores

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#241 alternativista

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 04:00 PM

i think there are better ways of approaching this, even if it does work, who really wants pee or semen on them? i could think of maybe one time that would it be necessary, and thats after being stung by a jelly fish.


????? I've no idea why you've even made such a silly comment comment. Of course there are better approaches. Such as the many, many pages of discussion about proper preparation to reduce lectins and traditional food combinations involving nutrients that bind up lectins. While there has been a post or two mentioning urine and semen, that is not what this thread is about and there is 12 pages filled with other information.

#242 bobbi364

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 04:02 PM


i think there are better ways of approaching this, even if it does work, who really wants pee or semen on them? i could think of maybe one time that would it be necessary, and thats after being stung by a jelly fish.


????? I've no idea why you've even made such a silly comment comment. Of course there are better approaches. Such as the many, many pages of discussion about proper preparation to reduce lectins and traditional food combinations involving nutrients that bind up lectins. While there has been a post or two mentioning urine and semen, that is not what this thread is about and there is 12 pages filled with other information.


i was distracted by it, sorry...i agree with the rest though, food is one way to approach clogged pores...there are several more

#243 alternativista

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 12:58 PM

Hah! I just noticed something. In the first post I had stated that the ZAG enzyme was found in bodily fluids including sweat. Perhaps this is a factor in why working up a sweat helps many people. I don't sweat much, which can be a symptom of hypo-thyroidism or low functioning thyroid, and perhaps the reduced sweating and therefore the reduced ZAG enzyme on the surface of the skin is a factor in why people with hypothyroidism often get acne. ???

#244 whoartthou1

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 01:25 AM

From the 2009 report titled Recent Advances in Acne Pathogenesis Information
http://piel-l.org/bl...al-alliance.pdf

Sebum contains several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which play important roles in the inflammatory process of acne. The levels of MMPs are significantly reduced in the acne lesions following treatment.


See, I wondered what enzymes might be in normal sebum but my quick searches didn't produce any results.

Metalloproteinases (or metalloproteases) constitute a family of enzymes from the group of proteases, classified by the nature of the most prominent functional groupin their active site. These are proteolytic enzymes whose catalytic mechanism involves a metal. Most metalloproteases are zinc-dependent, but some usecobalt. - wikipedia def

So, they might just be talking about the ZAG, at least with the zind-dependent ones. But did Cordain ever tell us that ZAG was found in your sebum?

This is a better wikipedia article on the metalloproteinase matrix. Doesn't specifically mention the ZAG enzyme. A little bit about cell differentiation. And a bit about a 'cysteine switch.' Cysteine is a sulfur containing amino acid and we hopefully all know by now how beneficial sulfur is, in the diet and topically.

Also talks of inhibitors, especially synthetic ones i.e. drugs. Names doxycycline. Isn't this prescribed for acne? And it inhibits the enzymes that allow normal exfoliation? And even more important things affected by proper cell proliferation and death?

There's a study cited in that wikipedia article about the cysteine switch but I'm afraid I get nothing from the abstract. At least not without a lot of thought into what it might mean.


Wow, this might be it for me! I was on doxycycline hyclate 100mg 2x a day for 4 months, and now i have tons of dead skin all over my face everyday (also on shoulders/back). I wonder how i can reintroduce these enzymes which would allow for normal exfolition hmm...

#245 alternativista

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 09:03 AM



From the 2009 report titled Recent Advances in Acne Pathogenesis Information
http://piel-l.org/bl...al-alliance.pdf


Sebum contains several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which play important roles in the inflammatory process of acne. The levels of MMPs are significantly reduced in the acne lesions following treatment.

See, I wondered what enzymes might be in normal sebum but my quick searches didn't produce any results.

Metalloproteinases (or metalloproteases) constitute a family of enzymes from the group of proteases, classified by the nature of the most prominent functional groupin their active site. These are proteolytic enzymes whose catalytic mechanism involves a metal. Most metalloproteases are zinc-dependent, but some usecobalt. - Collectively, they are capable of degrading all kinds of extracellular matrix proteins, but also can process a number of bioactive molecules. They are known to be involved in the cleavage of cell surface receptors, the release of apoptotic ligands (such as the FAS ligand), andchemokine/cytokine in/activation.[3] MMPs are also thought to play a major role on cell behaviors such as cell proliferation, migration(adhesion/dispersion), differentiation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and host defense.

So, they might just be talking about the ZAG, at least with the zinc-dependent ones. But did Cordain ever tell us that ZAG was found in your sebum?

This is a better wikipedia article on the metalloproteinase matrix. Doesn't specifically mention the ZAG enzyme. A little bit about cell differentiation. And a bit about a 'cysteine switch.' Cysteine is a sulfur containing amino acid and we hopefully all know by now how beneficial sulfur is, in the diet and topically.

Also talks of inhibitors, especially synthetic ones i.e. drugs. Names doxycycline. Isn't this prescribed for acne? And it inhibits the enzymes that allow normal exfoliation? And even more important things affected by proper cell proliferation and death?

There's a study cited in that wikipedia article about the cysteine switch but I'm afraid I get nothing from the abstract. At least not without a lot of thought into what it might mean.

Wow, this might be it for me! I was on doxycycline hyclate 100mg 2x a day for 4 months, and now i have tons of dead skin all over my face everyday (also on shoulders/back). I wonder how i can reintroduce these enzymes which would allow for normal exfolition hmm...

Your body produces the enzymes. Just stop inhibiting them. Also your skin needs to be acidic for them to function, so stop stripping your acid mantle away with soap. See also the linoleic acid thread. It's an important part of the acid mantle and mammals with skin problems of all sorts have been found to be deficient.

Edited by alternativista, 27 February 2013 - 01:11 PM.


#246 whoartthou1

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 03:25 PM

i think there are better ways of approaching this, even if it does work, who really wants pee or semen on them? i could think of maybe one time that would it be necessary, and thats after being stung by a jelly fish.


this approach makes a ton of sense though

#247 alternativista

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 10:51 AM

Screw soaking and then toasting nuts. I just eat em raw' outta the pack.

I recently found the joys of eating beans too! Sure, soaking your own would be easier and delicious but I usually just make a quick curry or salad and it's delicious! They are soaked in salt only (I tried to find salt free, failed, you can find sugar free in abundance though).


FYI: Salt displaces some of the magnesium in the skins. This is what makes the skin more tender and why people do it. But I don't want my magnesium displaced.

#248 alternativista

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 02:09 PM

So phytic acid (aka inositol hexaphosphate, IP6) is one of the forms of inositol and a source of myo inositol which has been found to improve insulin signaling and seratonin production. But of course we know it chelates minerals/metals, but that isn't entirely a bad thing.  Many are toxic in excess. Some, like mercury, in any amounts. Phytic acid is used as a chelating substance for uranium.  It's also used in soil to remove contaminants such as uranium.

 

From the wikipedia - 

 

phytic acid functions as a phosphorus store, as an energy store, as a source of cations and as a source of myoinositol (a cell wall precursor). Phytic acid is the principal storage forms of phosphorus in plant seeds.[10]  In animal cells, myoinositol polyphosphates are ubiquitous, and phytic acid (myoinositol hexakisphosphate) is the most abundant, with its concentration ranging from 10 to 100 uM in mammalian cells, depending on cell type and developmental stage.[11][12] This compound is not obtained from the animal diet, but must be synthesized inside the cell from phosphate and inositol (which in turn is produced from glucose, usually in the kidneys). The interaction of intracellular phytic acid with specific intracellular proteins has been investigated in vitro, and these interactions have been found to result in the inhibition or potentiation of the physiological activities of those proteins.[13][14] The best evidence from these studies suggests an intracellular role for phytic acid as a cofactor in DNA repair by nonhomologous end-joining.[13] Other studies using yeast mutants have also suggested intracellular phytic acid may be involved in mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytosol.[15] There are still major gaps in the understanding of this molecule, and the exact pathways of phytic acid and lower inositol phosphate metabolism are still unknown. As such, the exact physiological roles of intracellular phytic acid are still a matter of debate.[16]

So what I'm trying to determine is if sprouting my buckwheat frees up the inositols. 

 

 

And then in the wikipedia article on phytase it says this:

 (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate phosphohydrolase  is any type of phosphatase enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phytic acid (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate)  

 

Article on phytates and bone health with links to several studies: http://www.bonehealt...nositol_49.aspx

 

Abstract of a study that seems to examine how processing affects digestion of phytates, but there;'s no full text. 

http://www.annualrev...4.060183.001115

 

Phytic acid is found within the hulls of nuts, seeds, and grains.[2] In-home food preparation techniques can reduce the phytic acid in all of these foods. Simply cooking the food will reduce the phytic acid to some degree. More effective methods are soaking in an acid medium, lactic acid fermentation, and sprouting.[17]

Phytic acid has a strong binding affinity to important minerals, such as calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc, although the binding of calcium with phytic acid is pH-dependent[18] and ascorbic acid(vitamin C) can reduce phytic acid's effect on iron.[19] When a mineral binds to phytic acid, it becomes insoluble, precipitates and will be nonabsorbable in the intestines. This process can therefore contribute to mineral deficiencies in people whose diets rely on these foods for their mineral intake, such as those in developing countries.[20][21] Contrary to that, one study correlated decreased osteoporosis risk with phytic acid consumption.[22] It also acts as an acid, chelating the vitamin niacin, the deficiency of which is known as pellagra.[23] In this regard, it is anantinutrient, despite its possible therapeutic effects (see below). For people with a particularly low intake of essential minerals, especially those in developing countries, this effect can be undesirable.

"Probiotic lactobacilli, and other species of the endogenous digestive microflora, as well, are an important source of the enzyme phytase which catalyses the release of phosphate from phytate and hydrolyses the complexes formed by phytate and metal ions or other cations, rendering them more soluble, ultimately improving and facilitating their intestinal absorption."[24]

 

 

 

Scandinavian study on grains commonly eaten there: http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3572214/

Whole grain foods are valuable sources of minerals. A high content of phytate in these products has been considered a factor for limited bioavailability of these nutrients. Degradation of phytate may, however, result in an increased bioavailability of the minerals (29). This could be done during food processing like soaking, germination, malting, and fermentation. At optimal conditions for the enzyme phytase (55°C, pH 4.5–5.0) the phytate could be effectively reduced after 12–16 h of soaking. The acidity of the dough during breadmaking is of great importance for phytate degradation during scalding and sour dough fermentation. After 8 h of fermentation at 37°C, a reduction of 65% of the phytate content may be obtained in regular dough, compared to 97% in sour dough.


Edited by alternativista, 26 February 2013 - 02:33 PM.


#249 wicky

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 02:10 PM

alternativista, I have been recently diagnosed with graves disease and have often wondered what and how it contributes to my skin issues.  Im very confused and overwhelmed at all the info you posted about the ZAG enzyme and its relationship to cell differentation.. Clogged pores plague me something awful. Its not just a normal clogged pore or two but they are embedded in my chin by the hundreds. I thought I had seb derm issues but have tried anti fungals and changing my diet drastically but my skin cell turnover will not regulate.  I am on Armour thyroid  medicine and take good supplement and dont know what else to try.  What are your thoughts?



#250 alternativista

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 02:25 PM

alternativista, I have been recently diagnosed with graves disease and have often wondered what and how it contributes to my skin issues.  Im very confused and overwhelmed at all the info you posted about the ZAG enzyme and its relationship to cell differentation.. Clogged pores plague me something awful. Its not just a normal clogged pore or two but they are embedded in my chin by the hundreds. I thought I had seb derm issues but have tried anti fungals and changing my diet drastically but my skin cell turnover will not regulate.  I am on Armour thyroid  medicine and take good supplement and dont know what else to try.  What are your thoughts?

Doesn't graves cause an over active thyroid? In which case, why would you take thyroid hormones? Has anything changed since you started taking it?

I think what you should take away from this thread is to soak and cook your beans properly and ideally soak, sprout or ferment what grains you consume. And avoid or limit the most harmful. And eat your glyconutrients. There is that bit about colostrum obtaining zag and so it might be beneficial topically. There's another enzyme involved in dissolving the cell matrix and Its regulated by estrogens. and zag production is regulated by glucocorticoids which is what spironolactone is which may be a big factor in how its helpful in acne.

Did you try topical linoleic acid? It plays a vital role in the production of these enzymes and pretty much every thing else to do normal skin function. And your thyroid affects the lipid composition of your sebum.

Edited by alternativista, 01 March 2013 - 03:11 PM.


#251 alternativista

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 07:50 AM

This post on the benefits of nettles and nettle tea claim the lectins in nettles act like antibodies. Something to look into. Beneficial lectins. Sure there's a lot of research into lectins to treat cancer, but that doesn't mean they are good for you. Cancer treatments tend to be bad or you.


http://www.buzzle.co...h-benefits.html

#252 aanabill

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 08:47 AM

I have 'good' amount of lentil(lentil soup or dal) every day - almost always thrice a day(with breakfast, lunch & dinner).

i do it because i love them, they are so filling & also for the nutritional value - mainly the protein content!

my mum never soaks them.

but we first boil them and them add in spices, lil' oil and sometimes even veggies like carrots.

(i'll ask her to add onions &/or garlic everyday if she can)

 

is it okay if i have that much lentil soup through a day?

i ask this 'health wise' not just skin.

 

 

p.s i always have lentil soup with some white rice(which is my lunch & dinner staple along with good amount of veggies, fish/egg curry etc.)

i try to balance out my white rice(not much) with good about of protein, fibre, and as much as fat as i get from fish/egg/some oil used in cooking etc.



#253 alternativista

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 10:02 AM

I have 'good' amount of lentil(lentil soup or dal) every day - almost always thrice a day(with breakfast, lunch & dinner).

i do it because i love them, they are so filling & also for the nutritional value - mainly the protein content!

my mum never soaks them.

but we first boil them and them add in spices, lil' oil and sometimes even veggies like carrots.

(i'll ask her to add onions &/or garlic everyday if she can)

 

is it okay if i have that much lentil soup through a day?

i ask this 'health wise' not just skin.

 

 

p.s i always have lentil soup with some white rice(which is my lunch & dinner staple along with good amount of veggies, fish/egg curry etc.)

i try to balance out my white rice(not much) with good about of protein, fibre, and as much as fat as i get from fish/egg/some oil used in cooking etc.

 

I believe if you look back through the thread where there are the charts on the various lectins in various seeds, you'll find that substances that bind up the lectins in lentils are abundant in a variety of foods that are probably abundant in your diet.  But I can't swear to that. I haven't memorized it all.  But a rule of thumb is that the hardest lectins to destroy or bind up are those in the gluten grains and soy. And maybe peanuts, again, I don't remember on that.



#254 greentiger87

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 01:17 PM

So phytic acid (aka inositol hexaphosphate, IP6) is one of the forms of inositol and a source of myo inositol which has been found to improve insulin signaling and seratonin production. But of course we know it chelates minerals/metals, but that isn't entirely a bad thing.  Many are toxic in excess. Some, like mercury, in any amounts. Phytic acid is used as a chelating substance for uranium.  It's also used in soil to remove contaminants such as uranium.

 

 

So what I'm trying to determine is if sprouting my buckwheat frees up the inositols. 

 

Be careful with sprouting buckwheat. I've added a lot of buckwheat to my diet recently, for unrelated reasons. The buckwheat *plant* contains large amounts of fagopyrin (a structurally interesting compound related to hypericin from St. Johns wort). The compound is phototoxic, and orally bioavailable.. it builds up in your skin after eating it. All the human case studies I've read (easily searched for on the net) are of people juicing or otherwise consuming fresh buckwheat greens or shoots. On exposure to sunlight, fagopyrin absorbs photons and produces singlet oxygen and other reactive radicals, which then go on to damage surrounding tissues. In people who have been regularly consuming fresh buckwheat, this results in extreme sensitivity to light, swelling and itching, and being easily sunburned... this evolves into neurological symptoms, dizziness and nausea. 

 

The buckwheat *seeds* themselves contain only trace amounts of fagopyrin, and thus whole buckwheat, kasha, and buckwheat flour are perfectly fine. And of course, they've been eaten without problems for thousands of years. I haven't found any references to sprouting buckwheat as a traditional practice, though. Kasha is invariably made from buckwheat groats that are toasted/roasted and then boiled. Soba is made from unsprouted buckwheat flour. 

 

I've been toying with just soaking overnight. I doubt this could realistically cause a problem if only eaten occasionally. But there has to be a clear advantage to weigh against the risk. Unfortunately, I've been unable to find any reports on at what point in the life of the plant fagopyrin is produced, or the concentration of fagopyrin in sprouts. Shoots are very high in fagopyrins though, so it stands to reason that production begins with germination of the seed. 

 

Anyway, just wanted to let people know. I was quite surprised to learn of this. 


Edited by greentiger87, 27 October 2013 - 01:18 PM.


#255 alternativista

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 07:43 PM

So phytic acid (aka inositol hexaphosphate, IP6) is one of the forms of inositol and a source of myo inositol which has been found to improve insulin signaling and seratonin production. But of course we know it chelates minerals/metals, but that isn't entirely a bad thing.  Many are toxic in excess. Some, like mercury, in any amounts. Phytic acid is used as a chelating substance for uranium.  It's also used in soil to remove contaminants such as uranium.
 
 
So what I'm trying to determine is if sprouting my buckwheat frees up the inositols. 

 
Be careful with sprouting buckwheat. I've added a lot of buckwheat to my diet recently, for unrelated reasons. The buckwheat *plant* contains large amounts of fagopyrin (a structurally interesting compound related to hypericin from St. Johns wort). The compound is phototoxic, and orally bioavailable.. it builds up in your skin after eating it. All the human case studies I've read (easily searched for on the net) are of people juicing or otherwise consuming fresh buckwheat greens or shoots. On exposure to sunlight, fagopyrin absorbs photons and produces singlet oxygen and other reactive radicals, which then go on to damage surrounding tissues. In people who have been regularly consuming fresh buckwheat, this results in extreme sensitivity to light, swelling and itching, and being easily sunburned... this evolves into neurological symptoms, dizziness and nausea. 
 
The buckwheat *seeds* themselves contain only trace amounts of fagopyrin, and thus whole buckwheat, kasha, and buckwheat flour are perfectly fine. And of course, they've been eaten without problems for thousands of years. I haven't found any references to sprouting buckwheat as a traditional practice, though. Kasha is invariably made from buckwheat groats that are toasted/roasted and then boiled. Soba is made from unsprouted buckwheat flour. 
 
I've been toying with just soaking overnight. I doubt this could realistically cause a problem if only eaten occasionally. But there has to be a clear advantage to weigh against the risk. Unfortunately, I've been unable to find any reports on at what point in the life of the plant fagopyrin is produced, or the concentration of fagopyrin in sprouts. Shoots are very high in fagopyrins though, so it stands to reason that production begins with germination of the seed. 
 
Anyway, just wanted to let people know. I was quite surprised to learn of this. 

Or with the growth of one foliage to be exposed to the sun. I only sprout until the root starts forming. I haven't noticed any increase in photo sensitivity and I've Been oing this for a whole and been in the sun a lot lately. I was interested in seeing what growing buckwheat and buckwheat greens was like though. I have a few plants in my garden.




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