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#1 blarm44

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 06:28 AM

I wondered what people thought of this at home light treatment for acne .I'm thinking of getting it although it's expensive.Is it worth it or should I look at cheaper systems like acnelamp?

http://www.britebox-.../acne/index.php


andy

#2 ~ Dee

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 11:46 AM

The led are at peaks at 415 blue and 660 nm red, their red is only at 630nm... I would shop around some more.
A couple alternatives for less in the peak range... (idk if you are in the UK?)
http://www.lightsfor....com/csb-rb.htm

scroll down for different products...
http://www.light-the...om/products.htm


http://www.naturebri...com/clarity.php

Just an FYI, led lights do last longer, & do not produce heat. But, I know from experience that beautyskin lamp also works to clear up acne.

Good luck, & post your experiences. smile.gif

#3 lusa

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 09:04 AM

Hi, I am new to this board.
I live in the UK and suffer quite badly with Acne.
I have heard that LED light therapy is a breakthrough in Acne treatment but don't want to buy any of the US products mentioned above as I want to deal with a UK company. Mainly so it's easy claim any money back guarantee if the product doesn't work.
I have contacted the UK site mentioned and enquired about the range of red LED's mentined. I thought yourself or other readers might be interested in their response. So I have pasted it below. If anyone has had any experience using this Britebox Dermaclear on their Acne, please post them here. Thanks

---------------------

"Thank you for your enquiry. We used to exclusively supply the beautyskin acne unit within the UK, however, on developing our own products, our spectrometer found that the light levels of the beautyskin was too low when compared to the Hammersmith study.

The britebox dermaclear has 840 LEDs that emit 415nm (this is the most important and effective element for clearing acne) and 633nm. We use 633nm red as the dermaclear is based on the most recent research which shows an amazing 81% clearance for mild to severe acne and is a far better outcome than the Hammersmith study. See

The only way that you can receive a comparable treatment is within clinics. The britebox dermaclear will last the user approximately 20 years and comes with a 60 day money back guarantee for effectiveness€¦

As a company we develop products to be effective and we are sure that the dermaclear is the most effective product on the market today."


#4 ~ Dee

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 09:37 AM


I wish I had time to research more today, but unless I'm cancelled, I'll be working...
If you are confident it'll do the job, go for it.


Thank you, I had not previously heard of this study... Seems I can't access the full article, but this is what I found...

http://pt.wkhealth.com/pt/re/bjdr/abstract...#33;8091!-1


QUOTE
Phototherapy with blue (415 nm) and red (660 nm) light in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

Original Articles
British Journal of Dermatology. 142(5):973-978, May 2000.
PAPAGEORGIOU, P.; KATSAMBAS, A. *; CHU, A.

Abstract:
Summary: In this study we have evaluated the use of blue light (peak at 415 nm) and a mixed blue and red light (peaks at 415 and 660 nm) in the treatment of acne vulgaris. One hundred and seven patients with mild to moderate acne vulgaris were randomized into four treatment groups: blue light, mixed blue and red light, cool white light and 5% benzoyl peroxide cream. Subjects in the phototherapy groups used portable light sources and irradiation was carried out daily for 15 min. Comparative assessment between the three light sources was made in an observer-blinded fashion, but this could not be achieved for the use of benzoyl peroxide. Assessments were performed every 4 weeks. After 12 weeks of active treatment a mean improvement of 76% (95% confidence interval 66-87) in inflammatory lesions was achieved by the combined blue-red light phototherapy; this was significantly superior to that achieved by blue light (at weeks 4 and 8 but not week 12), benzoyl peroxide (at weeks 8 and 12) or white light (at each assessment). The final mean improvement in comedones by using blue-red light was 58% (95% confidence interval 45-71), again better than that achieved by the other active treatments used, although the differences did not reach significant levels. We have found that phototherapy with mixed blue-red light, probably by combining antibacterial and anti-inflammatory action, is an effective means of treating acne vulgaris of mild to moderate severity, with no significant short-term adverse effects.

© 2000 British Association of Dermatologists


#5 blarm44

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 07:30 AM

I'm confused as to which product I should go with.The beauty skin lamp has wavelengths in the correct place but if there is new research saying that redlight should be at a lower wavelenght as it is more effective I don't know which to go for.I'll contact brite box and see if they can send me the new research paper.

andy

#6 ~ Dee

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 12:41 PM

I'm really curious what study they are referring to. Do find out, because these are hydroponic grow bulbs too.
They simply may be sticking with that story because that's the best deal they could get on their led bulbs.(in that nanometer)
The thing probably does work...

#7 ~ Dee

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 12:56 PM

http://www.acne.org/...87#entry2697887

Here's a link to my other thread. It looks like that light will work just fine, read all the links contained within & see for yourself. I'm very happy to have finally found a bunch of information to help people! smile.gif

Here's a link to what study I believe they are referring to...->
http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum

#8 lusa

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 02:11 AM

OK I've given in to my curiosity or desperation and ordered a Britebox Dermaclear.
I received the product this morning, and it feels very well made, time will tell if it "does what it says on the box". There is a 60 day, no quibble, money back guarantee, which gives me some confidence in it.

Before I made the decision to purchase I studied all their published research. I have quoted it below and uploaded the pdf's in case anyone else is interested.

I'll post back here in a few weeks and let you all know the results on my face.

QUOTE
research
Clinical studies show that blue light and red light, working at specific wavelengths, act together in clearing mild to severe acne. The blue light (415nm) has an antibacterial effect whilst the red light (633nm) acts as an effective anti-inflammatory.

In the first study of its kind, conducted at Hammersmith Hospital, Dr Chu et al evaluated the use of a mixed blue and red fluorescent lights in the treatment of acne. Download PDF of Full Study

They achieved a mean improvement of 76% in inflammatory lesion reductions (1.)

More recently, Dr Goldberg and Dr Russell replicated this study with the use of LEDs as the red/blue light source (633nm and 415nm respectively). They achieved an astounding mean lesion reduction of 81%.
Download PDF of Full Study

They concluded that:
"[the] combination blue and red LED therapy appears to have excellent potential in the treatment of mild to severe acne" (2.)

We have been treating acne with light for 6 years now and have an excellent treatment response. See our customer testimonials
References
(1.) Dr A Chu (2000). Phototherapy with blue and red light in the treatment of Acne Vulgaris. British Journal of Dematology. 142: 973-978
(2.) David J. Goldberg & Bruce A. Russell (2006). Combination blue (415 nm) and red (633 nm) LED phototherapy in the treatment of mild to severe acne vulgaris. Journal of Cosmetic and Laser Therapy. 8: 71-75

About Acne
Acne is one of the most common and resistant skin conditions to affect humans. Indeed, regardless of skin type, lifestyle or cleanliness, approximately 80% of the population will suffer from acne at some point in their lives, with a staggering 70% of adolescents developing acne. Yet many sufferers fail to respond adequately to current acne cures and/or develop problematic side effects. In addition, the cost and duration of acne cures with topical applications and oral antibiotics make standard therapies far from ideal.

Acne usually starts in adolescents as an affect of hormonal changes; however, acne can also start in peoples 20's and 30's.

Acne is the result of the obstruction and inflammation of the sebaceous gland. The obstruction of the glands opening causes the accumulation of sebum, which is inevitably followed by a build up of bacterial population, or more specifically Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). As part of the process, P. acnes attract inflammatory cells, which cause the red and painful expression of acne. These inflamed pustules can lead to permanent scaring.

Previous Acne Cures

Topical Applications
Widely available prescription creams have traditionally been one of the most popular acne cures, however, creams often irritate the skin and have minimal long-term effect in actually reducing P. acnes.

Acne Cures - Oral Antibiotics
More effective than topical applications, However, more recently people (and GP's) are becoming reticence in using/prescribing oral medications. This is due to their severe side effects and increasingly resistant bacterium (only 40% of bacterium is affected by today's antibiotics). Further, antibiotic regimes are a lengthy process (usually at least three to four months). Since improvement in acne is often very gradual, permanent scarring may occur. Hence, there is a growing reluctance within the medical community to use antibiotics except when absolutely necessary.
Acne Cures - Accutane®
Accutane is a "last resort" treatment for acne and is associated with potentially serious side effects.

It is quite clear that an alternative treatment has been required for some time. This is why researchers have been studying the effects of specific peak wavelengths of light in order to produce safe acne cures, and with very successful results.

With the advent of britebox dermaclear and innovative light wave technology, a safe and effective acne cure is now here.

Attached Files



#9 celestine

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 08:24 AM

I tried the BeautySkin unit before I discovered the Regimen and it did NOT work at all.....I was very disappointed. I hope the other product works for you.
The only thing that has worked in 16yrs of acne is the Regime!! Hooray!!

#10 databased

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 01:46 PM

An attempt to reproduce the benefits seen for combo red/blue light therapy clearly failed:

A study to determine the effect of combination blue (415 nm) and near-infrared (830 nm) light-emitting diode (LED) therapy for moderate acne vulgaris.

QUOTE
Six individuals failed to complete the study. Eleven individuals showed improvement ranging from 0% to 83.3%. A downward shift in the Burton grade was seen overall. Non-inflammatory lesion counts increased in four patients, but improved in the other seven by an average of 48.8%.

Clearly no miracle cure. If the population was youths, the benefits may also have been due to chance.

Not clear whether any of these studies protected the eyes well enough to rule out effects caused by retina/brain mechanisms unrelated to light on the skin.

#11 dermaclear

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 07:37 AM

Hi, I am the owner of Global Photonic who manufactures the britebox dermaclear.
I have been reading these posts and have felt the need to respond.
We used to supply the beautyskin into the UK under an agreement with Dr Kern, who manufacture the beautyskin. After selling 1000's of beautyskins and receiving feedback etc it was clear that this treatment was highly effective. the main study had been conducted by Dr Chu, who is one of Europe’s leading dermatologists. The study was good and Dr Chu still recommends this treatment to his clients.
However, on testing the beautyskin with our new spectrometer, we found the light levels to be vastly reduced from the levels quoted on the Hammersmith research, and that the fluorescent tubes did not deliver adequate specific wavelengths.
This is why we have developed the britebox dermaclear. Research has shown LED light to be more effective and we have adhered to the light levels stated within the main study. Indeed, by using 840 LED's the dermaclear has up to 24x better light intensity than the beautyskin.
I can only go by my experience with the beautyskin and the dermaclear and our 1000's of happy customers, but what I do know is that this treatment IS effective. We offer a 60 day money back guarantee and easy payment methods so if it is not effective or you are not happy with the product then you will get your money back, no problem.
I am not into light treatments just for fun, I really believe/know light therapy to be effective for many conditions including the treatment of acne vulgaris, otherwise I would not be doing it.
Take care. M. eusa_think.gif


#12 suz321

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 07:54 AM

QUOTE (dermaclear @ Sep 5 2009, 08:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi, I am the owner of Global Photonic who manufactures the britebox dermaclear.
I have been reading these posts and have felt the need to respond.
We used to supply the beautyskin into the UK under an agreement with Dr Kern, who manufacture the beautyskin. After selling 1000's of beautyskins and receiving feedback etc it was clear that this treatment was highly effective. the main study had been conducted by Dr Chu, who is one of Europe’s leading dermatologists. The study was good and Dr Chu still recommends this treatment to his clients.
However, on testing the beautyskin with our new spectrometer, we found the light levels to be vastly reduced from the levels quoted on the Hammersmith research, and that the fluorescent tubes did not deliver adequate specific wavelengths.
This is why we have developed the britebox dermaclear. Research has shown LED light to be more effective and we have adhered to the light levels stated within the main study. Indeed, by using 840 LED's the dermaclear has up to 24x better light intensity than the beautyskin.
I can only go by my experience with the beautyskin and the dermaclear and our 1000's of happy customers, but what I do know is that this treatment IS effective. We offer a 60 day money back guarantee and easy payment methods so if it is not effective or you are not happy with the product then you will get your money back, no problem.
I am not into light treatments just for fun, I really believe/know light therapy to be effective for many conditions including the treatment of acne vulgaris, otherwise I would not be doing it.
Take care. M. eusa_think.gif



QUOTE (suz321 @ Nov 12 2009, 08:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (dermaclear @ Sep 5 2009, 08:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi, I am the owner of Global Photonic who manufactures the britebox dermaclear.
I have been reading these posts and have felt the need to respond.
We used to supply the beautyskin into the UK under an agreement with Dr Kern, who manufacture the beautyskin. After selling 1000's of beautyskins and receiving feedback etc it was clear that this treatment was highly effective. the main study had been conducted by Dr Chu, who is one of Europe’s leading dermatologists. The study was good and Dr Chu still recommends this treatment to his clients.
However, on testing the beautyskin with our new spectrometer, we found the light levels to be vastly reduced from the levels quoted on the Hammersmith research, and that the fluorescent tubes did not deliver adequate specific wavelengths.
This is why we have developed the britebox dermaclear. Research has shown LED light to be more effective and we have adhered to the light levels stated within the main study. Indeed, by using 840 LED's the dermaclear has up to 24x better light intensity than the beautyskin.
I can only go by my experience with the beautyskin and the dermaclear and our 1000's of happy customers, but what I do know is that this treatment IS effective. We offer a 60 day money back guarantee and easy payment methods so if it is not effective or you are not happy with the product then you will get your money back, no problem.
I am not into light treatments just for fun, I really believe/know light therapy to be effective for many conditions including the treatment of acne vulgaris, otherwise I would not be doing it.
Take care. M. eusa_think.gif



GLOBAL PHOTONIC Ltd are now in liquidation

#13 r_j_hallett

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 02:58 PM

QUOTE (suz321 @ Nov 12 2009, 08:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (dermaclear @ Sep 5 2009, 08:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi, I am the owner of Global Photonic who manufactures the britebox dermaclear.
I have been reading these posts and have felt the need to respond.
We used to supply the beautyskin into the UK under an agreement with Dr Kern, who manufacture the beautyskin. After selling 1000's of beautyskins and receiving feedback etc it was clear that this treatment was highly effective. the main study had been conducted by Dr Chu, who is one of Europe’s leading dermatologists. The study was good and Dr Chu still recommends this treatment to his clients.
However, on testing the beautyskin with our new spectrometer, we found the light levels to be vastly reduced from the levels quoted on the Hammersmith research, and that the fluorescent tubes did not deliver adequate specific wavelengths.
This is why we have developed the britebox dermaclear. Research has shown LED light to be more effective and we have adhered to the light levels stated within the main study. Indeed, by using 840 LED's the dermaclear has up to 24x better light intensity than the beautyskin.
I can only go by my experience with the beautyskin and the dermaclear and our 1000's of happy customers, but what I do know is that this treatment IS effective. We offer a 60 day money back guarantee and easy payment methods so if it is not effective or you are not happy with the product then you will get your money back, no problem.
I am not into light treatments just for fun, I really believe/know light therapy to be effective for many conditions including the treatment of acne vulgaris, otherwise I would not be doing it.
Take care. M. eusa_think.gif



QUOTE (suz321 @ Nov 12 2009, 08:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (dermaclear @ Sep 5 2009, 08:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi, I am the owner of Global Photonic who manufactures the britebox dermaclear.
I have been reading these posts and have felt the need to respond.
We used to supply the beautyskin into the UK under an agreement with Dr Kern, who manufacture the beautyskin. After selling 1000's of beautyskins and receiving feedback etc it was clear that this treatment was highly effective. the main study had been conducted by Dr Chu, who is one of Europe’s leading dermatologists. The study was good and Dr Chu still recommends this treatment to his clients.
However, on testing the beautyskin with our new spectrometer, we found the light levels to be vastly reduced from the levels quoted on the Hammersmith research, and that the fluorescent tubes did not deliver adequate specific wavelengths.
This is why we have developed the britebox dermaclear. Research has shown LED light to be more effective and we have adhered to the light levels stated within the main study. Indeed, by using 840 LED's the dermaclear has up to 24x better light intensity than the beautyskin.
I can only go by my experience with the beautyskin and the dermaclear and our 1000's of happy customers, but what I do know is that this treatment IS effective. We offer a 60 day money back guarantee and easy payment methods so if it is not effective or you are not happy with the product then you will get your money back, no problem.
I am not into light treatments just for fun, I really believe/know light therapy to be effective for many conditions including the treatment of acne vulgaris, otherwise I would not be doing it.
Take care. M. eusa_think.gif



GLOBAL PHOTONIC Ltd are now in liquidation



Britebox have now been brought by a company called 'Mary Read Ltd', and they continue to sell both the britebox revive, and the britebox dermaclear.

Both of these products now come with a 60 day money back guarantee!!

They can be viewed here:


#14 Dander01

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Posted 22 August 2010 - 08:51 AM

Hi there - can anyone post their experiences with the Britebox?

I bought one two months ago and unfortunately, it hasn't been positive. Since using it, I have developed hundreds of white heads all over my face. I read some research that some people can develop this when exposed to light therapy.

As a result, I'm sending mine back. Very disappointed - but at least I'll get a refund.

#15 jack3100

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Posted 22 August 2010 - 09:20 AM

omnilux clear u has stronger settings

#16 Dander01

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Posted 25 August 2010 - 06:42 AM

QUOTE (jack3100 @ Aug 22 2010, 10:20 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
omnilux clear u has stronger settings


I checked the specs for the Omnilux and it has the same wavelength output as the Britebox - 415nm.



#17 jack3100

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Posted 25 August 2010 - 09:11 PM

not just the wavelength thats is important but the wcm2

#18 Dander01

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Posted 27 August 2010 - 04:40 AM

QUOTE (jack3100 @ Aug 25 2010, 10:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
not just the wavelength thats is important but the wcm2


Yeah it does seem that the omnilux has a higher wcm2, however I'm too apprehensive to use it now as my skin has got so bad.

As they are non-infected, non-inflammed white bumps under the skin, I don't see how light therapy will help anyway.

Thanks anyway though.

I just wondered if anyone else had had a similar problem with light therapy.

#19 jack3100

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Posted 27 August 2010 - 09:06 AM

leds wont help wth comedones, get them extracted

#20 Beaker

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Posted 16 October 2010 - 06:12 PM

re. "The study was good and Dr Chu still recommends this treatment to his clients."

I was his patient for a while and he never mentioned it to me, I was just given n-lite there.