The seborrheic dermatitis thread

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how does sulfur do awful things? its a known treatment in fighting seb derm..

and how is sunscreen bad? even a sensitive moisturizer with a spf 15....

Whenever I have used a sulfur based cleanser or topical, my face breaks out in an rash.

SPH is another story. I still haven't found something which will work with my skin. My derm said I could do be tested for all the natural and chemical sunscreen ingredients to find out what I'm allergic too, but it most likely wouldn't be covered by insurance. If I didn't have insurance, my patch test would have been $600!! Can't afford it. Lets see...I've tried the Neutrogena with Helioplex and it really aggravated my rosacea. Neutrogena Sensitive Skin 60 spf ...it's great for everywhere except my face. Made my face super oily plus my t-zone broke out. Purpose Dual Treatment moisture Lotion spf 15 felt like paint on my face, aggravate my rosacea and seb derm. Aveeno ultra-Calming Daily moisturizer spf 15 was just awful. It's ok when you put it on, but made my skin super greasy within 30 minutes plus the "visibly reduce redness" on the label lasted until the face became oily. The Laura Mercier counter gave me 2 samples of their products to try: Flawless Skin Oil-Free Day Lotion spf 15 made my rosacea super red plus had red bumps and Tinted Moisturizer spf 20 makes my rosacea a horrible bright red along with red bumps. Tried Paula's Choice spf products for both oily and dry skin. It was great she offers sample sizes to purchase. Ended up with a red, oily face and irritation.

So, all my make up doesn't contain spf. Always reading up on stuff, but very reluctant to try new things. It takes up to a month to clear things up so I would be able to try something new. Suggestions? I'm thinking about trying the Vanicream spf stuff. I like their moisturizer.

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EDIT

Edited by Sting36e

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I have this, i was given desonide. Desonide is what caused me to break out again enough that im now on my 2nd round of acutane. (This is 1 year after the first time)

Be careful.

Acutane seems to be helping this though. Strange

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I was diagnosed with sebopsoriasis on my scalp a year ago, which my derm said is a combo of psoriasis and seborraic dermatitis. It really sucks. Some days my scalp is clear, other days it's like an avalanche of dandruff or whatever the stuff is. I also get it around my nose and behind and inside my ears.

He gives me this foam, called Olux, which helps sometimes, and gives me laser treatments. Doesn't seem like they do anything.

I have seborrheic dermatitis also. It's on my scalp, face, in my nose and ears. I love sulfur for this. I use Dr. Joesoef's 10% sulfur soap and it works miracles. It's also great for acne (face and body). I've tried prescription medicines and OTC shampoos but nothing works better than this sulfur. You can google their website. It's not expensive and the bar of soap lasts a pretty long time.

Also, try to stay away from shampoos with sulfates because they can aggravate the condition. Try more natural products. Tea tree oil also helps calm down the itch.

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If i have this disease and its caused by oil buildup would it be bad if i used cetaphil because of my acutane?

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I was diagnosed with sebopsoriasis on my scalp a year ago, which my derm said is a combo of psoriasis and seborraic dermatitis. It really sucks. Some days my scalp is clear, other days it's like an avalanche of dandruff or whatever the stuff is. I also get it around my nose and behind and inside my ears.

He gives me this foam, called Olux, which helps sometimes, and gives me laser treatments. Doesn't seem like they do anything.

Same for me and it's making me paranoid, but I've had this since I was younger. And I tried anti-breakouts face washes and oil moisturizers and things but non of it works. I feel there's no use to seeing a dermo if people are saying some of the stuff really only works for a short time. :cry:

I don't know what to do because now I think I have eczema on my arms ugh, and I'e got paranoid for some reasons and started using gensing oil on my arms that was stupid because I found out gensing oil naturally lightens the skin and that's not what I want being a dark skinned person, I'm just so sad...

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Hey,

Im 22, i've had Seb Derm for about 4 years now, its on my forehead, nose, cheeks, side of face, back, scalp. I've always been image consicious and when this started to appear after I had finally got rid of my acne I was not best pleased - who can blame me from wanting to look my best! I am from the UK, and from the sounds of things a lot of the people writing on this board are from the USA - which I think makes a big difference as I will explain later. I didn't really know what I had wrong with me at first and the doctors were pretty useless, they would give me all sorts of different creams, steroids, antifungals etc etc (nizoral, hydrocortizone, Canisten + a whole load of other stuff I can't remember the name of). I think they thought I was dumb and hence they didn't actually give me a proper name, they would always give me some kind of explanation but never actually pin point a name for me. I went to America to stay with my girlfriend, and I had a really bad flair up - the worst ive had, I dont know if it was the sun or a different type of water or something, but it became a lot worse. My face was bright red and my head was intensly itchy that I shaved all of my hair off and used a straight razor on my scalp (it was THAT bad). I was pretty horrified to see little red blobs all over the top of my head. My girlfriend was kind enougth to pay for me to go and see an American Doctor. Now this woman KNEW what she was talking about, she said "you have 'Seb Derm' and I am going to refer you to a dermatologist"(the first time I had heard a name for what I have all over my scalp and face). Unfortunately I had to return to jolly old England. Well the doctors here welcomed me with their usual defeatist attitude - "theres no point seeing a dermatologist like the American GP stated because there really isnt anything they can do". So I was stuck with another steroid. Anyway, now im going solo and I really rely on these type of message boards. SO THANKYOU to everyone who writes on them. It really is a united struggle that us Seb Derm sufferers have got to overcome.

Sorry if I have ranted on, here is what I have discovered:

Nizorol shampoo can work at first, but after a few years of use tends to do nothing.

Nizorol cream is pretty much the same as the shampoo.

Creams containing a steroid such as Hydrochortizone should be used sparingly and in my opinion if you havn't used them before don't start!

Betnovate Scalp application may appear to be doing wonders, but once the itchy and redness has

died down, the condition comes back ten times worse- AVOID!

A course of 5 antifungal tablets make my skin look like a babies - its perfect, not a spot, but a week later - BAM Seb Derm is back. I think a constant course of these would disrupt the 'good' fungus in my body so thats out of the question.

Mild moistorisers with a waterbase are the only real relief I find - Cetraben Emolient

Unfortunately I don't think there is a 'cure' for this but I believe it has to be controlled. We all have immunodeficiancy diorders and it looks to be a hereditary complaint. I think different people find different techniques work for them that other would find may make their complaint worse, although I do think everything is worth a try. I don't know about all of you, but I can never truely enjoy ANYTHING in life knowing that I have a bright red itchy dry face.... or maybe im being dramatic...

oh and on another note has anyone tried this: Clarisonic skin cleaning system.

Im thinking about buying one, but I dunno if im just being desparate.

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Acutane seems to be helping this though. Strange

i read somewhere that, similar to how it's used for acne, accutane is also kind of a last-ditch attempt to get rid of SD...it slows your oil production and then the fungus doesn't have anything to feed on

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Hi all, just wanted to share what has worked for me.

I've been cleansing with DERMAdoctor Born to be Mild. It has 2% Zinc pyrithone in it, which is supposed to kill seb derm fungus. I use it once a day, at night. It has reduced flaking quite a bit and as long as my dead skin levels are down, my skin ends up being very smooth and healthy looking. I also moisturize with Cetaphil Lotion, just because it's really the only thing I've found to reduce flakes substantially without drying me out in the long run. I just use a very small amount. I then follow up with straight up Extra Virgin Olive Oil to control flakes even more, help heal old marks and even skin tone.

So far it's been great. Flaking, tightness, redness and dryness are basically gone. Only a few flakes here and there but I've only strictly been using the cleanser for about a week.

Cleanser can be gotten here.

http://www.dermadoctor.com/product_DERMAdo...anser_1527.html

There's a chance I'll flare up again since this is a chronic condition but this definitely controls it. Other factors for me are stress and diet. If I can maintain these 2 things, I also see improvement but mainly I need to get the dead skin layer off so my products can actually absorb properly. I think many people continue to use products on top of the dead skin layer and that just makes things worse. The product doesn't absorb, sits on the surface and leaves film, making skin tone look awful. I did that for a while. Getting that layer off in any way possible(even manual exfoliation with cloth, fingers/fingernails) helps a ton, just try to be gentle.

This is what has worked for me, so far.

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Hi all, just wanted to share what has worked for me.

I've been cleansing with DERMAdoctor Born to be Mild. It has 2% Zinc pyrithone in it, which is supposed to kill seb derm fungus. I use it once a day, at night. It has reduced flaking quite a bit and as long as my dead skin levels are down, my skin ends up being very smooth and healthy looking. I also moisturize with Cetaphil Lotion, just because it's really the only thing I've found to reduce flakes substantially without drying me out in the long run. I just use a very small amount. I then follow up with straight up Extra Virgin Olive Oil to control flakes even more, help heal old marks and even skin tone.

So far it's been great. Flaking, tightness, redness and dryness are basically gone. Only a few flakes here and there but I've only strictly been using the cleanser for about a week.

Cleanser can be gotten here.

http://www.dermadoctor.com/product_DERMAdo...anser_1527.html

There's a chance I'll flare up again since this is a chronic condition but this definitely controls it. Other factors for me are stress and diet. If I can maintain these 2 things, I also see improvement but mainly I need to get the dead skin layer off so my products can actually absorb properly. I think many people continue to use products on top of the dead skin layer and that just makes things worse. The product doesn't absorb, sits on the surface and leaves film, making skin tone look awful. I did that for a while. Getting that layer off in any way possible(even manual exfoliation with cloth, fingers/fingernails) helps a ton, just try to be gentle.

This is what has worked for me, so far.

This contains sulfates which could aggravate the problem further.

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I see a lot of people are putting oil on their skin. That won't help at all but will only hinder the recovery. Dandruff and SD sufferers have a certain condition. Their skin reacts badly to oleic acid which is a byproduct of yeast living naturally on the skin. Bad reaction to oleic acid is a genetic trait of your skin.

All natural oils contain oleic acid, sometimes in higher concentrations than what the yeast could possibly produce. This will worsen the condition. Not only that, but the oil could feed the yeast as well since they're lipid dependant. I would just resort to water on affected places to allow the skin to return to a state of balance. It will eventually fight the condition off on its own.

And stay away from steroid creams or stuff that irritates sebaceous glands.

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Does this ever go away?

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Does this ever go away?

not really. it can go into remission for years though. sometimes after suffering for years it just finally goes away on its own

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Hi all, just wanted to share what has worked for me.

I've been cleansing with DERMAdoctor Born to be Mild. It has 2% Zinc pyrithone in it, which is supposed to kill seb derm fungus. I use it once a day, at night. It has reduced flaking quite a bit and as long as my dead skin levels are down, my skin ends up being very smooth and healthy looking. I also moisturize with Cetaphil Lotion, just because it's really the only thing I've found to reduce flakes substantially without drying me out in the long run. I just use a very small amount. I then follow up with straight up Extra Virgin Olive Oil to control flakes even more, help heal old marks and even skin tone.

So far it's been great. Flaking, tightness, redness and dryness are basically gone. Only a few flakes here and there but I've only strictly been using the cleanser for about a week.

Cleanser can be gotten here.

http://www.dermadoctor.com/product_DERMAdo...anser_1527.html

There's a chance I'll flare up again since this is a chronic condition but this definitely controls it. Other factors for me are stress and diet. If I can maintain these 2 things, I also see improvement but mainly I need to get the dead skin layer off so my products can actually absorb properly. I think many people continue to use products on top of the dead skin layer and that just makes things worse. The product doesn't absorb, sits on the surface and leaves film, making skin tone look awful. I did that for a while. Getting that layer off in any way possible(even manual exfoliation with cloth, fingers/fingernails) helps a ton, just try to be gentle.

This is what has worked for me, so far.

This contains sulfates which could aggravate the problem further.

It's actually very gentle and pH balanced which is important. The main thing is that you don't continue using it month after month. Using it for a week at a time then taking a break and only using it if a flare up comes will not aggravate the problem. It hasn't had ANY irritation on me at all. Another thing with SD is that you need a fairly thorough cleanser to get the job done. Read up on it, you need a strong cleanser to be able to really fend off the bacteria properly. Sodium Laureth can certainly irritate skin in the long run but short term, it's actually a very effective cleansing agent and "delivery system" which allows the active Zinc ingredient to penetrate better.

The fact that this is the only thing that has ever given me relief from my SD/Eczema means something. I've tried more than most people, with little to no results and now my flaking is almost fully gone.

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Since it cant be cured. Are there any great ways to cover up the redness?


masculinity is the ability to flirt with the effeminate


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One more thing...

People with SD should be absolutely positive that they don't have dandruff in scalp. If they do, remove it with a medicated shampoo. Some patients have reported how their SD went away after they got rid of scalp dandruff.

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One more thing...

People with SD should be absolutely positive that they don't have dandruff in scalp. If they do, remove it with a medicated shampoo. Some patients have reported how their SD went away after they got rid of scalp dandruff.

What are you saying? How should we do this?

I was just prescribed Locoid, anyone try it?

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Since it cant be cured. Are there any great ways to cover up the redness?

i've found that maybelline colorstay for dry skin works best...your skin still feels really dry under the makeup but the makeup doesn't crack or flake off.

arturX- are you saying do something like wash your hair with anti-dandruff shampoo and see what happens?

and has anyone here tried any of the oral anti-fungal medications? what about tanning?

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Hi :)

There is a looong BG story here but let me jump to the useful bit:

My life long SD spots are disappearing after I discontinued everything else and instead rub them generously with lip balm stick 3-4 times a week. (I had 4 spots. 2 are *gone* and 2 are reduced to 'slightly discolored smooth skin', after 6 weeks of this.) The lip balm I use: Nivea Hydro Care Art.-Nr. 85088

Sidenote: Late summer is a good time for my skin (sun/vitD) so there is a chance its not 100% because of the balm..

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Late summer is good for SD because UV light kills yeast. Don't overdo it of course, you don't want to get cancer as well.

As for dandruff shampoo and SD...

There are indications that if you have strong dandruff on your scalp, immune system is overwhelmed and cannot fight off the yeast on other places (such as face) so SD develops.

Now if you never had scalp dandruff in your life but you have SD, additional lab tests should be made to identify the underlying cause.

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One more thing...

People with SD should be absolutely positive that they don't have dandruff in scalp. If they do, remove it with a medicated shampoo. Some patients have reported how their SD went away after they got rid of scalp dandruff.

What are you saying? How should we do this?

I was just prescribed Locoid, anyone try it?

REB - I mentioned to you in the thread you started that Locoid (like Desinoid) is a corticosteriod and it is the strongest corticosteriod that you can use on the face. As I also mentioned, using steriod creams is risky. Please read the following - it is perhaps the best warning and description of what these topicals can do. Believe me, I developed this condition and it took a long time to get my skin back to normal.

ST. JULIANS, MALTA -- When you see clinical signs of rosacea, think "topical corticosteroid overuse." A large proportion of patients presenting with what looks to be rosacea actually have steroid-induced dermatitis, Dr. Suzana Ljubojevic said at the First World Congress of the International Academy of Cosmetic Dermatology. "They start using corticosteroids for seborrheic dermatitis or other dermatoses, and the steroids are often 'prescribed' by friends or relatives," said Dr. Ljubojevic of the department of dermatology, Zagreb Clinical Hospital, Croatia. At first, the anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictive effects of the steroids result in what seems to be clearance of the primary dermatitis. But persistent use leads to epidermal atrophy, degeneration of dermal structure, and collagen deterioration after several months, she noted. In the end, the skin has the appearance of rosacea, and it is rendered extremely vulnerable to bacterial, viral, and fungal infection. Patients persist in using steroid creams or ointments because they have typically learned the hard way about the severe rebound inflammation that occurs if they stop. In short, they find themselves caught between rosacea like steroid dermatitis and the erythematous pustular eruptions of steroid rebound. By the time they present their condition to a dermatologist, they are very uncomfortable and unhappy. Dr. Ljubojevic and colleagues undertook a survey of 502 consecutive patients at their clinic with signs and symptoms of rosacea. There were 163 men and 339 women, spanning an age range of 15-79. Only 196 (39%) of the patients had never used corticosteroids. The remaining 306 (61%) were routine topical steroid users. They began to use corticosteroids for a wide range of primary diseases. The youngest patients were typically trying to get rid of acne. The oldest patient, a 79-year-old man, had begun steroids to treat keratosis. Dr. Ljubojevic noted that 331 of the 502 (66%) patients were positive for Demodex folliculorum. On initial assessment, it can be very difficult to distinguish between true rosacea and its steroid-induced mimic. The neck and scalp are often the giveaway, said Dr.Roger Allen of the University Hospital, Nottingham, England. Commenting on Dr. Ljubojevic's presentation, he pointed out that steroid-induced dermatitis is often diffuse, extending from the face down along the neck. In balding men, the scalp is often affected. True rosacea tends to be less diffuse. Dr Ljubojevic said there is no easy way to resolve steroid-induced dermatitis, short of ceasing steroid use. This is, admittedly, a hard sell to patients who have already experienced the severe erythema, edema, and pustular eruptions associated with steroid rebound. The severity of these symptoms can be minimized by avoiding use of cosmetics while the skin is vulnerable and by applying pH-neutral creams and lotions. Topical or systemic antibiotics may be needed if the patient has a bacterial infection. Dr. Ljubojevic and her colleagues have found cold chamomile tea compresses to be a soothing adjunct for patients in the throes of steroid backlash. It is important to explain the rebound phenomenon to these patients. They are often baffled by their observation that the same medicine that was so effective in clearing their primary dermatoses or acne is now causing this distressing rosacea like condition, and that their skin gets markedly worse if they stop treatment. Prudence in steroid use is essential, she stressed. "Patients with seborrheic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, or other dermatoses simply should not be treated with topical corticosteroids."

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REB - I mentioned to you in the thread you started that Locoid (like Desinoid) is a corticosteriod and it is the strongest corticosteriod that you can use on the face. As I also mentioned, using steriod creams is risky. Please read the following - it is perhaps the best warning and description of what these topicals can do. Believe me, I developed this condition and it took a long time to get my skin back to normal.

true. the day before i went to the derm for the first time my SD got really, really bad. my mom gave me the last little bit of this cream she uses sometimes for the eczema on her hands called fluocinide. it literally made the SD go away completely. i asked my derm for a prescription for it and he nearly died. he said topical steroids can move the delicate fat on your face around.

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Just a question; Does anyone here every have used anti-yeast cream for their seborrheic dermatitis besides for cortisone?


masculinity is the ability to flirt with the effeminate


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I am glad to see this topic. My daughter who is 11 noticed some dryness in and around her ear. small little patches, Then a couple months later she started scratching her head, when I looked in there there are portions that huge dryness of the scalp in areas. I freaked out, we tried the anti dandruff shampoo thinking it was dandruff, but it didn't help.

The doctor said it was Seb Derm, My question is has anyone ever gotten rid of it? Will she have to deal with this for the rest of her Life?

It seems like the medicated shampoo is working some, but not alot.....

So any other suggestions for her would be grateful......


The secret of health for both mind & body

is not to mourn for the past, not to worry about the future, or not anticipate troubles, but to live the present moment wisely and earnestly.

The Buddha


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Just a question; Does anyone here every have used anti-yeast cream for their seborrheic dermatitis besides for cortisone?

Hi. I've tried Ketoconazole topical. Good and bad. Good= I've gone back to it when the seb derm flares and it helps. Right now, am on it for 1-2 weeks at night and my Noritate for rosacea during the day.. (The Merck Manual, suggested 1-2 weeks of Ketoconazole to to be used twice a day for flares, then use for maintenace.) I will probably use it 1/week as maintenance, then go back to what my derm had prescribed for me as a daily routine. For bad flares, my derm prescribed for Azithromycin antibiotics for 5 days, which I'm doing along with the Keto. Bad= due to the humidity in my area, it's really hard to wear it during the day under make up.

Currently, I have a day left of antibiotics and will continue the Ketoconazole for a few more days, then return to my daily routine. The seb derm looks pretty good, however, the Keto isn't rosacea friendly, but it's not that bad. My daily routine is Clindamycin Lotion (AM/PM), Nortiate Cream (AM), Akne-Mycin (PM), and a non-spf moisturizer AM/PM. If skin is dry, Vanicream Lite Lotion. I'm trying California Baby products now for a daily moisturizer. So far, their Super Sensitive Everyday Lotion is great. I also sent away for their travel pack so I will be able to try their SPF lotions. Yeah, I know I gotta wear spf, but everything irritates so my derm suggested to take it slow.

Research the Ketoconazole and talk with your derm about it. I can't take anything with sulfur so can't help with those products. Good luck.

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