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Natural DHT/ Androgen Blockers


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#1 lovelolita

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 12:04 PM

Since I have mild hirsutism ( Or at least I think I do, maybe it just comes from my Eastern European/ Romani heritage eusa_think.gif ) AND acne... I was hoping some of you guys could help me figure out natural DHT blockers/ Testosterone reducers..
I know of Spearmint or Peppermint tea, and EFAs to balance hormones..
What about DIM? Is that more for people w/estrogen dominance/bad estrogen? I think on a DIM thread on these boards I read that it was DHT blocker... but the information I read seemed conflicted. I also know of vitex but I think that is also for estrogen dominance...
They also sell DHT blockers and other hormone balancing herbs etc...

Search results for "DHT" on Iherb

A lot of those look like they are for men though...
What about stinging nettle?

Any info/experiences would be great!
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#2 alternativista

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 05:51 PM

Zinc, couple of the B-vitamins, beta sito sterol, the EGCG in tea...

Also phyto-androgens have the potential to bind to receptors blocking them so that your stronger human androgens can't and producing a lessor effect. But the additional androgens can also make your acne worse. Just like phyto-estrogens make some people's acne worse and some better.

Messing with your hormones always has the potential to make things worse.

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#3 rakbs

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 10:31 PM

Peppermint, saw palmetto, and green tea are the only natural androgen blockers that I know of that are backed up by at least some science.

DIM is involved with estrogen metabolism, which only indirectly affects androgen metabolism. It shouldn't be considered an androgen blocker.
Clear for 8+ months now through striving for optimal fitness levels, stress levels, sleep, nutrient density in my body, and an overall holistic lifestyle approach.

Diet (I stick to this as much as I can): eggs; meat; poultry; wild-caught seafood; vegetables; fat sources from coconut oil, olive oil, and butter; fruit as I crave it; tea; and purified water. I buy organic and/or pastured foods as I reasonably can, but I think that it's the type of foods you eat, and not the quality of food (within reason, of course) that most determines how healthy you will be.

I highly recommend green smoothies as nutrition powerhouses. They are good on so many levels.

Now experimenting with a higher proportion of legumes, nuts, and seeds in my diet.

I eat absolutely no gluten. I limit intake of all grains, but up to two servings of non-glutenous grain a day is fine. I avoid all added sugar--high fructose corn syrup, sugar, honey, etc. I stay away from soybean oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, and other oils not named olive or coconut. I base my diet off of whole, unprocessed foods, and I prepare them in healthful, delicious ways.

Daily exercise. Sunlight whenever possible.

Supplements: Currently? None. Supplements that have helped in the past (and I can personally recommend) are fish oil, zinc, apple cider vinegar, Vitamin D.

#4 alternativista

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 04:07 PM

Ok, so rereading some old threads, something I'd ignored before sunk in. And that is that there are different enzymes that convert Testosterone to DHT. Type 1 effects DHT that binds to oil follicles. And type 2 effects DHT that binds to hair follicles.

Spearmint tea contains a substance that is a Type 2 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor. Therefore, Spearmint tea is specifically going to help with hirsutism, but probably not help acne or oily skin at all.

One of the studies comments that peppermint tea has a more estrogenic effect and might help some people because of that. But it might make some people worse.

Some threads to read:
http://www.acne.org/...s-Spir-f51.html
EGCG can decrease DHT, but other substances in green tea can increase DHT
http://www.acne.org/...in-t189363.html
Phyto-Androgens, foods with plant androgen hormones: http://www.acne.org/...;hl=cholesterol

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#5 calla lily

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 12:59 PM

Look into PCOS.


#6 alternativista

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 02:25 PM

Some info I copied and pasted a few years ago. Don't have all the sources. Much of it is about male pattern baldness. And it isn't always clear which type of 5-Alpha Reductase inhibitors they are talking about, but some inhibit both. DYODD

GLA, ALA, Linoleic Acid and Oleic Acid as DHT Blockers

Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA), Alpha Linolenic Acid (ALA), Linoleic and Oleic Acid are essential fatty acids found in plant oils. These fatty acids have been individually proven to inhibit 5-Alpha Reductase. In fact these are the most powerful inhibitors of 5-Alpha Reductase known today. Not only do they inhibit the Type II form of the 5-Alpha Reductase which other products like Propecia® inhibit, but also the Type I form of the enzyme which is present in high concentrations in the scalp, sebaceous glands, and the skin. Additionally GLA, ALA and Oleic acid have potent anti-inflammatory properties.

There are many plant sources like Borage Oil and primrose oil which are known to contain gamma linolenic acids and alpha linolenic acids and are used as Natural Herbal Remedies for hair loss.


Azelaic Acid, Vitamin B6 and Zinc

Azelaic acid is a naturally occurring dicarboxylic acid found in whole grain cereals, rye, barley and animal products. It is FDA approved as a topical preparation for the treatment of acne and it is effective against a number of other skin conditions when applied topically. There is strong scientific evidence that Azelaic Acid and Zinc are potent inhibitors of 5-Alpha-Reductase. When Azelaic acid, Vitamin B6 and Zinc Sulfate were added together at low concentrations, 90% inhibition of 5 Alpha-Reductase activity was obtained. The synergistic activity of these compounds against 5-Alpha-Reductase makes this combination potentially a very effective hair growth formula for treatment of Male Pattern Baldness.


A Hair Growth Formula for DHT Hair Loss

Many companies every now and then churn out new natural hair growth formulas by combining GLA, ALA, Linoleic Acid, Azelaic acid, Vitamin B6, Zinc Sulfate and Saw Palmetto extracts. These ingredients work through different mechanisms to synergistically inhibit both type 1 and 2 forms of 5-Alpha Reductase and decrease DHT locally. By decreasing the DHT levels, hair follicles can grow and thicken naturally, leading to a fuller, healthier scalp without the side effects associated with synthetic medications.

Zinc has been shown to be a beneficial vitamin in the
treatment of both Alopecia Areata and Androgenic Alopecia. Oral zinc
has been shown to be of benefit in Alopecia areata and seems to have
an immunomodulatory effect.There have been studies in which zinc is
shown to inhibit 5 alpha reductase activity, and it is therefor
concluded that zinc is beneficial in diseases and disorders related to
an excess in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)
such as Androgenetic Alopecia, Benign Prostratic Hyperplasma and acne.
There have been studies that have shown that vitamin b6, zinc and
azelaic acid combined together, even at very low concentrations caused
a 90% inhibition of 5 alpha reductase activity. Zinc is a vitamin that
is used in other disorders related to excess dihydrotestosterone, such
as acne and prostratic disease. One may be likely to assume that as it
is of benefit in treating these types of androgen dependent conditions
then it may be of some benefit in the treatment of androgenetic
alopecia. Topical application of zinc has shown to reduce sebum
production and acne. Also some people suffering from acne have been
found to have zinc deficiencies in their skin, despite of the fact
that they may have normal levels within their bloodstream..."
([LifestylesNews] Lifestyles Newsletter, 02/2002 Vol. 2, Issue 2)
http://www.pcolist.o...ary/000042.html

Vitamin B6 has been widely reported to control acne, especially
premenstrual outbreaks due to hormonal imbalances. By metabolizing
fats and fatty acids, vitamin B6 balances oil production in the skin.
http://www.healthwel...0...=54&mcat=58

Flax lignans
http://www.acne.org/...ctase inhibitor

Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), the main flax lignan, can help prevent this by inhibiting production of the enzyme that converts testosterone into DHT, called 5-alpha reductase.
Basically, the phytoestrogens can be a double edged sword depending upon your natural estrogen level in your body. If it's dominant, it can make DHT further dominant. If it does work well for you, then perhaps you have a huge testosterone dominance and too little estrogen perhaps.


http://www.acne.org/...ctase inhibitor


http://www.mdr.com/h...wo_problems.htm - Adds green tea and ginkgo biloba.

Within our bodies exists the enzyme, steroid Type II 5 alpha-reductase, which converts testosterone (male hormone) to 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). It is believed that accumulation of DHT in the prostate leads to Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH), or an enlarged prostate. What’s interesting is that the same accumulation of DHT in the prostate may be linked to male pattern baldness.

Receptors in hair follicles allow DHT to enter. What happens is that DHT shrinks your hair follicles. DHT also thickens your scalp’s membrane, which restricts blood flow to the capillaries that feed hair follicles. As the effects of DHT progressively damage hair follicles, there is an inflammatory response mediated by the immune system. Immune cells cause further damage to hair follicles, eventually destroying them. This combination of events is what causes hair to fall out.(1) The medical term for this balding process is called androgenetic alopecia (AGA or male pattern baldness). Is there any way to inhibit DHT production AND block its entrance into hair follicles? Studies show there may be.

Green Tea, a Natural DHT Blocker!
Scientists found that certain natural compounds may inhibit production of 5 alpha-reductase and DHT while preventing DHT from getting into hair follicles. One common household item that contains potential DHT-blocking nutrients is Green tea. Within tea leaves are two compounds, epicatechin-3-gallate, and epigallo-catechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which have been shown to inhibit 5 alpha-reductase activity.(2) Although there have been no human studies of Green Tea’s impact on hair growth, animal studies have shown that when Green Tea polyphenol extract was added to their drinking water, the animals presented significant hair regrowth.(3)

Fatty Acids for Thinning Hair.
Another source of DHT blockers is Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an essential fatty acid (EFA) found mostly in plant-based oils such as evening primrose oil, black currant seed oil, and borage oil. EFAs are necessary for healthy brain function, bone health, stimulation of skin and hair growth, and metabolism. GLA has been shown in studies to inhibit DHT-enhanced activity of 5 alpha-reductase. (4) In one study, animals treated with GLA had a noticeable effect on inhibiting 5 alpha-reductase type 2.(5) In the study, researchers investigating another compound that inhibited 5 alpha-reductase type 2 suggested this particular agent might be effective for fighting male pattern baldness.

60% Saw Improvement!
In addition to the agents just discussed, researchers have been investigating Beta Sitosterol, a botanical ingredient, for its role in blocking the conversion of testosterone to DHT. Beta Sitosterol has been shown to be effective against BPH. This is the first example of a placebo-controlled, double-blind study undertaken in order to examine the benefit of this substances in the treatment of AGA (male pattern baldness). The study involved males between the ages of 23 and 64 with mild alopecia (male pattern baldness). Sixty percent of the study group treated with Beta Sitosterol were rated as improved at the final visit. The study showed that naturally occurring 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors against AGA warrants further clinical trials.(6)

Baldness May be Just a Memory.
Another plant extract adding to the list of DHT blockers is Ginkgo Biloba. We normally think of Ginkgo as a memory nutrient due to its ability to promote vasodilation and improve blood flow in arteries. veins, and capillaries, which is good for the brain (7). But, Ginkgo Biloba also helps improve microcirculation in the blood vessels of the scalp so that the hair can receive sufficient nourishment. So an extract that helps memory may also help our hair.

There’s also Saw Palmetto, a plant extract that has also been shown to suppress DHT levels in the prostate, suggesting that inhibition of the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase is a mechanism of action of this substance. (8) A review of various alpha-blocker treatments published in a medical journal indicated that “treatment for men with co-occurring benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis may include alpha-blockers, 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and phytotherapies (saw palmetto and bee pollen extract), with evidence clearly showing the benefits of alpha-blocker therapy.”(9) Although there have been conflicting reports as the impact Saw Palmetto has on blocking DHT, many studies do provide compelling evidence that the plant extract is effective in this area. In fact, one study found that there was such a strong positive response to Saw Palmetto and Beta-Sitosterol treatment in participants with Androgenetic Alopecia, the lead researcher felt this therapy justified expansion to much larger trials.(10)

While there are numerous studies confirming the benefits of supplementing with these plant-derived alpha-blockers to improve BPH, concluding that alpha-blockers can also benefit men with male pattern baldness is more difficult. However, the idea that inhibiting production of DHT makes perfect sense and is worth trying a supplement that provides the previously mentioned agents. Even the drug Propecia works by inhibiting the 5-alpha reductase enzyme so it prevents the conversion of testosterone into DHT â€" exactly what Saw Palmetto, Green Tea, and Beta-Sitosterol do!.

Edited by alternativista, 10 February 2012 - 04:17 PM.

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#7 Bosie

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Posted 18 December 2014 - 12:58 PM

Very old thread, so I apologise for the bump.

 

I haven't posted on this site for a few years now. I've improved my acne over the years through little changes to my diet here and there and especially in identifying what kind of acne I have and applying the right skin care routine. I've seen about 65-70% improvement in the last year but i'm still struggling to be completely acne free.

 

I was wondering if anyone has tried Alt Vista's suggestions in this thread for both acne and MPB and if it's had any effect on the two problems? I've noticed in the past year that my hair is really starting to recede and I'm wondering if I could kill two birds with one stone through an approach that could fight acne and MPB by addressing the possible hormonal issue that affects both of these problems.

 

Any ideas/Suggestions to inhibit DHT naturally?



#8 Bosie

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 08:37 PM

Bump

 

Anyone?



#9 alternativista

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 03:16 PM

Well your sebum should inhibit DHT.  But people mess with their sebum production and the lipids in their skin with soap and other topicals. Even moisturizers because they contain emulsifyers to keep the watery and oily ingredients mixed together.

 

I haven't washed my skin with soap (except hands) for several years.  See this: http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/330732-help-your-skin-function-stop-impairing-it/  and some of the other threads & sites it links to.

 

And I wonder why this thread wasn't archived. Many newer and frequently updated threads that I would have liked to keep going got archived. 


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#10 Bosie

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 03:48 PM

Thanks for the reply and I will check out the links. As I said, I tried the diet approach for years. I cut out gluten and dairy for a long time and have only just started reintroducing the two slowly with no bad effects so far.

 

For the above post on male pattern baldness, are green tea and zinc still regarded as the best DHT reducers out there? I keep getting conflicting information about green tea and whether or not it reduces DHT or actually increases it. I'm looking for supplements I can take that just might help hair growth and that might be the final piece of the puzzle with regards to a 15 year battle with acne. I've started to zinc again recently and hoping it might help on both fronts.



#11 alternativista

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 04:45 PM

Thanks for the reply and I will check out the links. As I said, I tried the diet approach for years. I cut out gluten and dairy for a long time and have only just started reintroducing the two slowly with no bad effects so far.

 

For the above post on male pattern baldness, are green tea and zinc still regarded as the best DHT reducers out there? I keep getting conflicting information about green tea and whether or not it reduces DHT or actually increases it. I'm looking for supplements I can take that just might help hair growth and that might be the final piece of the puzzle with regards to a 15 year battle with acne. I've started to zinc again recently and hoping it might help on both fronts.

 

There are substances in green tea that inhibit, but also substances that may promote it.  Fortunately, there's tons of info on the web on such things for MPB.


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#12 Hiannah

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 05:46 PM

I am a post-menopausal woman with a 47 year history of acne/excessively oily skin. My hormone levels were within normal limits during that time, but my skin was a mess. I have tried everything except Accutane, which is contra-indicated due to my very dry eyes. I had used large doses of vitamin B5, zinc, clean diet, meditation, tretinoin, fish oil, flax seeds, etc., along with every other product and treatment available. I had good effect only after I added pantothenic acid (vitamin b5) to my treatment regimen. In the last few years, I had started to have more hair thinning and now receeding hair line. I stopped the large dose vitamin b5 (2 grams/day in divided doses) and I started to take beta-sitosterol 375mg in divided doses with meals a few weeks ago. I am amazed!!!! For the first time in my life, I look in a mirror and need no concealer as my skin is perfectly clear!
Recently I had the flu and didn't take my supplements, including beta-sitosterol. My skin got really oily and I had a blemish. Once I resumed the beta-sitosterol, my skin cleared quickly. When I am consistent with taking it, my skin is actually normal with regards to sebum production and inflammation (redness).

I also use DHT blocking shampoo with ketoconasole 3x/week and herbal DHT blockers (nettle, saw palmetto, etc) the rest of the week. In the PM I use Rogaine to affected areas. I also use cosmetic scalp tint daily to hide areas of thinning temples.

My cholesterol levels soared with menopause and I am hoping that the plant sterols will lower them too. Time will tell.

I hope that this information is helpful to someone. If one person can benefit, then this post was worth writing.

#13 Bosie

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 11:23 AM

I am a post-menopausal woman with a 47 year history of acne/excessively oily skin. My hormone levels were within normal limits during that time, but my skin was a mess. I have tried everything except Accutane, which is contra-indicated due to my very dry eyes. I had used large doses of vitamin B5, zinc, clean diet, meditation, tretinoin, fish oil, flax seeds, etc., along with every other product and treatment available. I had good effect only after I added pantothenic acid (vitamin b5) to my treatment regimen. In the last few years, I had started to have more hair thinning and now receeding hair line. I stopped the large dose vitamin b5 (2 grams/day in divided doses) and I started to take beta-sitosterol 375mg in divided doses with meals a few weeks ago. I am amazed!!!! For the first time in my life, I look in a mirror and need no concealer as my skin is perfectly clear!
Recently I had the flu and didn't take my supplements, including beta-sitosterol. My skin got really oily and I had a blemish. Once I resumed the beta-sitosterol, my skin cleared quickly. When I am consistent with taking it, my skin is actually normal with regards to sebum production and inflammation (redness).

I also use DHT blocking shampoo with ketoconasole 3x/week and herbal DHT blockers (nettle, saw palmetto, etc) the rest of the week. In the PM I use Rogaine to affected areas. I also use cosmetic scalp tint daily to hide areas of thinning temples.

My cholesterol levels soared with menopause and I am hoping that the plant sterols will lower them too. Time will tell.

I hope that this information is helpful to someone. If one person can benefit, then this post was worth writing.

Thanks for posting your story. I'm definitely thinking of adding some dht blocker supplements.



#14 Green Gables

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 06:15 PM

Thanks for the reply and I will check out the links. As I said, I tried the diet approach for years. I cut out gluten and dairy for a long time and have only just started reintroducing the two slowly with no bad effects so far.

 

For the above post on male pattern baldness, are green tea and zinc still regarded as the best DHT reducers out there? I keep getting conflicting information about green tea and whether or not it reduces DHT or actually increases it. I'm looking for supplements I can take that just might help hair growth and that might be the final piece of the puzzle with regards to a 15 year battle with acne. I've started to zinc again recently and hoping it might help on both fronts.

 

I believe that beta sitosterol / saw palmetto is regarded as the strongest OTC DHT blocker. Any stronger and you need prescription Finasteride or spironolactone. 

 

Zinc can modulate DHT. In some studies it reduces it, in others it increases it. I wouldn't count on zinc as your main weapon in the arsenal.

 

EGCG is in green tea and can reduce DHT. However I recommend extract rather than the tea itself. The natural caffeine content in green tea spikes DHT a lot more than you would think. Caffeine in general = bad if you're trying to control your DHT levels.


Edited by Green Gables, 12 January 2015 - 06:18 PM.


#15 Bosie

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 01:34 PM

 

 

I believe that beta sitosterol / saw palmetto is regarded as the strongest OTC DHT blocker. Any stronger and you need prescription Finasteride or spironolactone. 

 

Zinc can modulate DHT. In some studies it reduces it, in others it increases it. I wouldn't count on zinc as your main weapon in the arsenal.

 

EGCG is in green tea and can reduce DHT. However I recommend extract rather than the tea itself. The natural caffeine content in green tea spikes DHT a lot more than you would think. Caffeine in general = bad if you're trying to control your DHT levels.

Thank you very much for the reply. I will do some research on Beta sitosterol later. Does it have any negative/positive effects on acne? biotin and saw palmetto have some users saying it breaks them out.

 

By the way I eat a lot of dark chocolate and I guess that has caffeine in it. Do you think it would spike DHT levels like green tea?



#16 alternativista

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 01:44 PM

Beta sitosterol is a component of plant fats, btw. There's a ton in an avocado. nutritiondata has a breakdown of fats in some foods. 

 

I took beta sitosterol supplements for a while and didn't notice anything significant, but I don't recall what I was hoping to improve at that time.  I think I was on this board, and my skin was mostly clear from diet before I ever came here. So perhaps it was hirsutism. 


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


#17 Green Gables

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 05:35 PM

 

 

 

I believe that beta sitosterol / saw palmetto is regarded as the strongest OTC DHT blocker. Any stronger and you need prescription Finasteride or spironolactone. 

 

Zinc can modulate DHT. In some studies it reduces it, in others it increases it. I wouldn't count on zinc as your main weapon in the arsenal.

 

EGCG is in green tea and can reduce DHT. However I recommend extract rather than the tea itself. The natural caffeine content in green tea spikes DHT a lot more than you would think. Caffeine in general = bad if you're trying to control your DHT levels.

Thank you very much for the reply. I will do some research on Beta sitosterol later. Does it have any negative/positive effects on acne? biotin and saw palmetto have some users saying it breaks them out.

 

By the way I eat a lot of dark chocolate and I guess that has caffeine in it. Do you think it would spike DHT levels like green tea?

 

Pick any treatment and someone will say it broke them out or didn't work.

 

Most people when treating hormonal acne aren't consistent and don't wait long enough. It took 8 months for me to get clear on prescription spironolactone. 8 MONTHS. There were plenty of times in there where I could have said "oooohhhh it's breaking me out" or "oooohhhh this isn't working it's hopeless". It was like nothing nothing nothing nothing nothing nothing SOMETHING clear. 

 

I think people envision that once they start on the right treatment, let's say they have 50 pimples, then the next week they'll have 40, and 30, and 20, and so on. Sometimes you have 50 and the next week you have 60, and then you have 30, and then you have 50 again...the body is an unpredictable beast.

 

I do know it's the spiro though because I can stay clear for months and if I try to wean off it acne comes back.


Edited by Green Gables, 13 January 2015 - 05:37 PM.


#18 Circadia

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 08:25 PM

I am a post-menopausal woman with a 47 year history of acne/excessively oily skin. My hormone levels were within normal limits during that time, but my skin was a mess. I have tried everything except Accutane, which is contra-indicated due to my very dry eyes. I had used large doses of vitamin B5, zinc, clean diet, meditation, tretinoin, fish oil, flax seeds, etc., along with every other product and treatment available. I had good effect only after I added pantothenic acid (vitamin b5) to my treatment regimen. In the last few years, I had started to have more hair thinning and now receeding hair line. I stopped the large dose vitamin b5 (2 grams/day in divided doses) and I started to take beta-sitosterol 375mg in divided doses with meals a few weeks ago. I am amazed!!!! For the first time in my life, I look in a mirror and need no concealer as my skin is perfectly clear!
Recently I had the flu and didn't take my supplements, including beta-sitosterol. My skin got really oily and I had a blemish. Once I resumed the beta-sitosterol, my skin cleared quickly. When I am consistent with taking it, my skin is actually normal with regards to sebum production and inflammation (redness).

I also use DHT blocking shampoo with ketoconasole 3x/week and herbal DHT blockers (nettle, saw palmetto, etc) the rest of the week. In the PM I use Rogaine to affected areas. I also use cosmetic scalp tint daily to hide areas of thinning temples.

My cholesterol levels soared with menopause and I am hoping that the plant sterols will lower them too. Time will tell.

I hope that this information is helpful to someone. If one person can benefit, then this post was worth writing.


How are you doing now with the beta sitosterol? Are you still on it? In many ways your story sounds like mine, even though I am 34. Yesterday I started beta sitosterol, same dosage as you. I was previously on spironolactone for 6 months but had to come off due to severe side effects. Spiro not only greatly cleared my skin but lowered an androgen level I was having difficulties with which was also causing my acne. I must say though this is only day 2 of beta sitosterol and my skin is WAY less oily than it was even on spiro. Now that is amazing! I truly hope it will clear my acne but it is too soon to say. I will give it at least a few months to know if it is consistently helping or not. I have also removed dairy from my diet and try my best to stick to a low-glycemic diet. I am interested to hear your results now 6 months after your post. Thanks :)



#19 starness

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 03:26 AM

I just cant keep up its too much information. Im so clueless. I know for a fclact I have hormonal acne. 10 year sufferer. And I am now 22 and get huge cystic pimples all over jaw line. Im tired of it. What should I start of taking in supplements?


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