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Fat the culprit behind candida, insulin resistance?

candida

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#1 mike_wf

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 06:44 PM

I know some people on this board have been having success with a low-fat diet. This article seems to give a pretty good explanation of why this might be so:

http://www.fredericp...es/candida.html

The article says that fat is the main cause of candida and reduced insulin sensitivity.
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#2 rakbs

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 08:23 PM

QUOTE
The way to beat candida is simple: you have to understand that candida is an issue that comes from eating too much fat, not too much sugar. When we eat too much fat, that excess fat in the bloodstream diminishes insulin sensitivity, so sugar isn€™t carried out as fast as it should to the cells.* It accumulates in the bloodstream, feeding the candida yeast that is naturally present there. The candida then proliferates to €œeat up€ the excess sugar.** The answer isn€™t to consume less sugar, or to try to kill the candida €” but to go at the root of the problem, that is, to consume less fat.


*Where is the source for the statement that fat in the bloodstream reduces insulin sensitivity?

Moreover, where is the source for the statement that excess fat accumulates in the blood stream in the first place? I was always under the impression that your body stored excess fat.

**Even if any of that were true, it ignores the fact that candida is an intestinal disorder. Candida infections start in the digestive system, not the bloodstream.

Hundreds of other articles contradict what this article said, and this article doesn't list any sources at the bottom, but it does try to sell you what is undoubtedly a bogus product. Moreover, mike_wf, I get the impression that you searched the web trying to find a link between high-fat diets and candida; in other words, you didn't know a single thing about this website beforehand, which suggests to me that you were out on a quest for attention, rather than the truth. Whether this is true or not, doesn't invalidate my above points, so I really don't care how long you've been visiting that website.
Clear for 8+ months now through striving for optimal fitness levels, stress levels, sleep, nutrient density in my body, and an overall holistic lifestyle approach.

Diet (I stick to this as much as I can): eggs; meat; poultry; wild-caught seafood; vegetables; fat sources from coconut oil, olive oil, and butter; fruit as I crave it; tea; and purified water. I buy organic and/or pastured foods as I reasonably can, but I think that it's the type of foods you eat, and not the quality of food (within reason, of course) that most determines how healthy you will be.

I highly recommend green smoothies as nutrition powerhouses. They are good on so many levels.

Now experimenting with a higher proportion of legumes, nuts, and seeds in my diet.

I eat absolutely no gluten. I limit intake of all grains, but up to two servings of non-glutenous grain a day is fine. I avoid all added sugar--high fructose corn syrup, sugar, honey, etc. I stay away from soybean oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, and other oils not named olive or coconut. I base my diet off of whole, unprocessed foods, and I prepare them in healthful, delicious ways.

Daily exercise. Sunlight whenever possible.

Supplements: Currently? None. Supplements that have helped in the past (and I can personally recommend) are fish oil, zinc, apple cider vinegar, Vitamin D.

#3 mike_wf

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 08:36 PM

rakbs, no need to get so angry and attack me. As for the connection b/w fat and insulin sensitivity, I've listed some sources in another thread. Here is one: http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/12643169

QUOTE (rakbs @ Dec 23 2008, 08:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
The way to beat candida is simple: you have to understand that candida is an issue that comes from eating too much fat, not too much sugar. When we eat too much fat, that excess fat in the bloodstream diminishes insulin sensitivity, so sugar isn�€™t carried out as fast as it should to the cells.* It accumulates in the bloodstream, feeding the candida yeast that is naturally present there. The candida then proliferates to �€œeat up�€� the excess sugar.** The answer isn�€™t to consume less sugar, or to try to kill the candida �€” but to go at the root of the problem, that is, to consume less fat.


*Where is the source for the statement that fat in the bloodstream reduces insulin sensitivity?

**Even if any of that were true, it ignores the fact that candida is an intestinal disorder. Candida infections start in the digestive system, not the bloodstream.

Hundreds of other articles contradict what this article said, and this article doesn't list any sources at the bottom, but it does try to sell you what is undoubtedly a bogus product. Moreover, mike_wf, I get the impression that you searched the web trying to find a link between high-fat diets and candida; in other words, you didn't know a single thing about this website beforehand, which suggests to me that you were out on a quest for attention, rather than the truth. Whether this is true or not, doesn't invalidate my above points, so I really don't care how long you've been visiting that website.


"Seek the truth from facts"

#4 rakbs

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 09:33 PM

QUOTE (mike_wf @ Dec 23 2008, 08:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
rakbs, no need to get so angry and attack me. As for the connection b/w fat and insulin sensitivity, I've listed some sources in another thread. Here is one: http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/12643169


Sorry if you perceived me to be angry or attacking you--I wasn't intending either.

Your study suggests that consumption of certain kinds of fat might increase insulin resistance, but your original source was talking about high levels of fat in the blood stream causing insulin resistance, which is completely different. High levels of dietary fat /=/ high levels of fat in the blood stream.

Of course, it would be one thing if it was set in stone that fat intake does indeed lead to insulin resistance, but this is not necessarily the case. If you want, I can post studies finding the exact opposite effect.

And none of this addresses the fact that candidiasis is an intestinal problem. Candida can inhabit other parts of the body, but for treatment of candidiasis, we should not be focusing on the blood stream in the first place.

Thank you for being prepared with some semblance of a good source to back up your views.
Clear for 8+ months now through striving for optimal fitness levels, stress levels, sleep, nutrient density in my body, and an overall holistic lifestyle approach.

Diet (I stick to this as much as I can): eggs; meat; poultry; wild-caught seafood; vegetables; fat sources from coconut oil, olive oil, and butter; fruit as I crave it; tea; and purified water. I buy organic and/or pastured foods as I reasonably can, but I think that it's the type of foods you eat, and not the quality of food (within reason, of course) that most determines how healthy you will be.

I highly recommend green smoothies as nutrition powerhouses. They are good on so many levels.

Now experimenting with a higher proportion of legumes, nuts, and seeds in my diet.

I eat absolutely no gluten. I limit intake of all grains, but up to two servings of non-glutenous grain a day is fine. I avoid all added sugar--high fructose corn syrup, sugar, honey, etc. I stay away from soybean oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, and other oils not named olive or coconut. I base my diet off of whole, unprocessed foods, and I prepare them in healthful, delicious ways.

Daily exercise. Sunlight whenever possible.

Supplements: Currently? None. Supplements that have helped in the past (and I can personally recommend) are fish oil, zinc, apple cider vinegar, Vitamin D.

#5 r3m3dy

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 12:39 PM

i really do believe sugar and fat and the way they interact is the main culprit behind acne. when you look at past civilizations that were acne free, they either consumed a high fat/low carb diet such as the eskimos. or on the other hand they consumed a high carb/low fat diet consisting of tubers and root vegetables with little to no fat.

#6 mike_wf

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 12:51 PM

I agree with you r3m3dy. And that is very much what you see on this board. There are people eating high fat/low carb to improve their acne. There are also people eating high carb/low fat to improve their acne.

QUOTE (r3m3dy @ Dec 24 2008, 12:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
i really do believe sugar and fat and the way they interact is the main culprit behind acne. when you look at past civilizations that were acne free, they either consumed a high fat/low carb diet such as the eskimos. or on the other hand they consumed a high carb/low fat diet consisting of tubers and root vegetables with little to no fat.


"Seek the truth from facts"

#7 Glass Danse

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 03:52 PM

QUOTE (r3m3dy @ Dec 24 2008, 01:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
i really do believe sugar and fat and the way they interact is the main culprit behind acne. when you look at past civilizations that were acne free, they either consumed a high fat/low carb diet such as the eskimos. or on the other hand they consumed a high carb/low fat diet consisting of tubers and root vegetables with little to no fat.


Well for a while, I thought fat was bad for you, and got skim, low-fat everything and thought it was the best for skin, and fat was by far my least consumed macronutrient, and was raised to eat low-fat things as often as I could... but it never really totally cleared my skin up... now that most of the food I eat is high in fat and low in carbs... clear skin. I think people still see fat as a bad macronutrient and associate it to acne...
"Factors that are known to cause variation in the levels of growth hormone (GH) and IGF-1 in the circulation include an individual's genetic make-up, the time of day, his or her age, gender, exercise status, stress levels, nutrition level and body mass index (BMI), disease state, race, estrogen status and xenobiotic intake."

IGF-1 --> androgens --> sebum --> acne.

#8 Paul25

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 04:03 PM

QUOTE (r3m3dy @ Dec 24 2008, 06:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
i really do believe sugar and fat and the way they interact is the main culprit behind acne. when you look at past civilizations that were acne free, they either consumed a high fat/low carb diet such as the eskimos. or on the other hand they consumed a high carb/low fat diet consisting of tubers and root vegetables with little to no fat.

Oily fats are defiently bad for me, always make my break out and make my face greasy/oily.
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#9 Glass Danse

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 05:49 PM

QUOTE (Paul25 @ Dec 24 2008, 05:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Oily fats


Opposed to what.....?
"Factors that are known to cause variation in the levels of growth hormone (GH) and IGF-1 in the circulation include an individual's genetic make-up, the time of day, his or her age, gender, exercise status, stress levels, nutrition level and body mass index (BMI), disease state, race, estrogen status and xenobiotic intake."

IGF-1 --> androgens --> sebum --> acne.

#10 rakbs

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 09:34 PM

QUOTE (r3m3dy @ Dec 24 2008, 12:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
i really do believe sugar and fat and the way they interact is the main culprit behind acne. when you look at past civilizations that were acne free, they either consumed a high fat/low carb diet such as the eskimos. or on the other hand they consumed a high carb/low fat diet consisting of tubers and root vegetables with little to no fat.


Do you have any examples of civilizations that live off of a diet of high carb/low fat, and a credible link to where I can read more about them?
Clear for 8+ months now through striving for optimal fitness levels, stress levels, sleep, nutrient density in my body, and an overall holistic lifestyle approach.

Diet (I stick to this as much as I can): eggs; meat; poultry; wild-caught seafood; vegetables; fat sources from coconut oil, olive oil, and butter; fruit as I crave it; tea; and purified water. I buy organic and/or pastured foods as I reasonably can, but I think that it's the type of foods you eat, and not the quality of food (within reason, of course) that most determines how healthy you will be.

I highly recommend green smoothies as nutrition powerhouses. They are good on so many levels.

Now experimenting with a higher proportion of legumes, nuts, and seeds in my diet.

I eat absolutely no gluten. I limit intake of all grains, but up to two servings of non-glutenous grain a day is fine. I avoid all added sugar--high fructose corn syrup, sugar, honey, etc. I stay away from soybean oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, and other oils not named olive or coconut. I base my diet off of whole, unprocessed foods, and I prepare them in healthful, delicious ways.

Daily exercise. Sunlight whenever possible.

Supplements: Currently? None. Supplements that have helped in the past (and I can personally recommend) are fish oil, zinc, apple cider vinegar, Vitamin D.

#11 r3m3dy

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 12:27 AM

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3076467/

QUOTE
In search of an explanation, the researchers examined the diets of the two primitive cultures. The Kitavan Islanders ate mostly fish, fruit, tubers and almost no processed foods, while the Ache hunter-gatherers consumed primarily vegetables, peanuts, rice, some wild game and only a small amount of pasta, bread and sugar.


As you can see the Kitavan's only source of fat was fish which does not provide a lot of fat. Your average fillet of fish has about 3 grams of fat. Aswell, the Ache's only source was peanuts and some wild game. I am unsure of the fat amount in wild game since it depends what kind of animal it is and what parts they eat. Although it is clear that both civilization's diets were primarily carbohydrates with minimal fat.

#12 bɭesstheʄẚɭɭ

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 12:37 AM

QUOTE (Glass Danse @ Dec 24 2008, 05:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Paul25 @ Dec 24 2008, 05:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Oily fats


Opposed to what.....?


Hah, +1.