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Acne/Scars and excess Protein Intake.

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The last couple years I've been experimenting with how food can cause acne in certain people.

I'm extremely interested in how Milk Products, and Animal Proteins, can contribute to acne in certain individuals, and ALSO how they can slow down the bodies self heal process to repair existing acne blemishes. From as long as I can remember, and I even talked to mom about this, I've had bowel problems as a child and all the way into adulthood, though.. I didn't start developing acne till about 18-19. As a child I consumed ALOT of milk. On a typical day, (Let's say from age 10-17 or so) I might have taken in 2 litres of milk alone, and possibly other milk products like cheese. I was overweight for most of my life until I reached about 19, and started changing my lifestyle (about the same time my acne started.. which is also interesting... ).

I've always suffered from mild to moderate acne. Over the past 4-5 months, I've been taking in 10g's of B5 daily, and have also gone to the gym consistently while keeping with a HIGH protein diet, animal meat, whey powder, etc.. During this time I did notice my back to be more prone to acne, and my face had a blotchy appearance, especially during exercise. Although the "cystic like" bumps under the skin seemed to diminish from the B5 (only logical explanation I can think of), my skin just changed it's consistency, very very pale looking, although discoloration isn't supposed to be a side effect from B5, however I now have my doubts on the studies that have been done.

Ok.. now here is what I have done over the past 2-3 weeks. I've stopped taking B5 Supplements, Whey Powder, and I have stopped worrying about how much protein I eat, and have also up'd my fruit/veggie intake, (Basically i'm eating alot more carbs, then protein). Additionally, I've always had bowel problems, so I've stopped my intake of milk, and milk products, which has been about.. 3 weeks to a month till now. And I've kept my intake of water high, like always. Now.. this is the interesting part, my skin is MUCH noticeably brighter in appearance, and the red blemishes, are disappearing rapidly, which really confused me as they had been sticking around for months up to the point I started changing my diet, and also.. I notice my cuts, a few that I had.. are healing ALOT faster. So this does baffle me quite a bit I'm really not sure what to make of it all?

I'll be studying Kinesiology (Study of Sports Medicine), in the fall, and ANYTHING and EVERYTHING I learn I will be sharing with you all in regards to acne, as nutrition is a part of the course study material as well. If all goes well over the next few months while I stick to this plan, I'll let you all know, I'm monitoring myself daily to see how my body is reacting to the adjustment.

I've followed diet regimes before in regards to insulin spikes being the cause of acne, and inflammation.. However.. Over the past 2-3 weeks, I've still been eating some sugared products, like cookies, chocolate (occasionally not everyday), and fruits have fructose, and so far no problems.. But avoiding animal products as much as possible, including dairy. In no way do I really want to become a vegetarian, however.. If I find out animal proteins are the primary cause of acne, I'll definetly cut down on my consumption to little to none.

Please realize what I'm explaining here is only my experience, I do believe everyones body reacts differently to certain foods, just like some of us have allergies and some don't. But, If you have tried all the different diets proposed and none have worked, why not try cutting out dairy and animal proteins?

Good Luck to everyone! I'll be posting any updates be it good/bad to this little adventure, I'll be hoping to stick with it for the next 1-2 months to let my body adjust, and see if the results continue to be lasting.

Take Care,

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Your regimin sounds really interesting, I'm anxious to hear how it works out for you! I've noticed that at least for me bad food = breakouts. I've stuck to what most people would consider a vegetarian diet for the last couple months, occiasionally I'll eat baked fish. For protein I'll eat a few hard boiled eggs throughout the day along with a lot of trail mix for snacks. Its not as sad and restrictive as it sounds! I've been eating this way for a while and barring some bad food choices over the past week which I have been paying for by looking pretty gross, things have been going well. Like you, I noticed my skin is noticably brighter when I eat this way.

I wish you only the best!

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Well the thing about milk and whey powder etc is that I have been allergic to ALL dairy and dairy products (from cow, goat whatever) all my life and I still get moderate acne..... its not fair!!!


- I had sex with your mom last night....

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According to Dr. Perricone, most americans don't get enough protien. In fact, he recommends you eat more then the 100% USDA recommended amount, which i doubt most people get in the first place.

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What is the recommended amount? I workout as well and try to keep it at 1.5g/lbs of body wieght.. so about 240g

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Perricone recommends 65-80 grams a day, and the U.S. RDA recommends less than that. It also depends on your body weight.

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I heard 1gram per pound of body weight, not to exceed 1.5grams per pound.

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I've played around with high protein diets for the past 2-3 years, depending on your level of activity will normally govern how much protein the body needs. The USDA sets its limits mostly accustomed to the average invidual who is NOT an athelete, and who exercises moderately once or twice a week (if that).

Saying the average person needs 65-80g's a day, or 1 gram per pound of bodyweight, really isn't that accurate. 1g per lb of bodyweight is recommended for atheletes. What would constitute being an athelete, rather then trying out for the olympics? In my opinion, if you are moderate, to highly active, 4-5 times a week, for 1-2 hours or more, Then your obviously putting in a great deal of training, therefore your body NEEDS the extra protein, and trust me it will let you know if your not eating enough. Also remember, most of these atheletes are not only consuming high amounts of protein, but carbohydrates as well. The body needs carbs in order to function correctly. Carbs are what give you energy, and the push to keep going.

So, there is no defined, set it stone amount of protein everyone should be taking in. It also depends on your level of activity, body composition, lifestyle, etc..

Cheers

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