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what i found about IgE vs. IgG food allergies..

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#21 alternativista

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 11:28 AM

Another thing I wonder. Some claim you never get over an allergy or intolerance. But, doesn't your body stop producing antibodies to some things? Why else would you need to get re-immunized for some things?

I'm of course, just talking about intolerances involving the immune system. If you lack the enzymes to digest dairy, grains or legumes, you probably aren't going to get to sprout them some day.


Linking another good thread about the different types of allergy testing:
http://www.acne.org/...es-t101599.html


And whole discussion on the various types of sensitivitie including the various factors involved that cause inflammation like histamine, Proinflammatory Prostaglandins, etc
http://www.acne.org/...se-t196132.html

#22 alternativista

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 01:08 PM

More studies indicating relationship between immune response and acne. So even if you don't ever detect any reaction to a food, food hypersensitivities may be contributing to your acne. Especially inflammatory acne.

This one is about scarring from inflammatory acne. Actually, it accepts that there is a cell mediated immune response involved and is studying the degree of inflammation leading to scarring.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....ogdbfrom=pubmed

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15688807

Also

Vitamin A deficiency increases inflammatory responses.
Study:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8972739
http://www.ncbi.nlm....ogdbfrom=pubmed

#23 alternativista

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 10:14 AM

So there's also IgA reactions, which apparently have a lot to do with gluten sensitivities.

Found this in a blog:

QUOTE
Approximately 12% of Americans can be diagnosed as gluten sensitive using blood antibody tests (anti-gliadin IgA or IgG). A subset of these have full-blown celiac disease. The vast, vast majority are undiagnosed. Gluten sensitivity associates with a dizzying array of diseases, including autoimmune disorders, cancer, and neurological problems. The problem with the blood tests is they aren't very sensitive. The most common blood tests for celiac disease look for a class of antibody called IgA. IgA is produced by the mucosa, including the gut. Unless gut damage is already extensive, the majority of IgA stays in the gut. This may cause the assay to overlook many cases of gluten sensitivity. A negative blood antibody test does not rule out gluten sensitivity!


It seems to be a good blog. There's no way for me to link straight to the entry, but there are keywords so you can search. There seems to be a lot on gluten and celiac here.
http://wholehealthso...ch/label/gluten

#24 alternativista

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:38 AM

What ALCAT tests for

Measures leukocyte cellular reactivity in whole blood, which, as I understand it, is the final pathway of all kinds of reaction types. Such as delayed and immediate reactions. Those involving IgE and IgG antibodies. Unlike most other tests most of which test only IgE which is the antibody involved in immediate and severe reactions that most people think of as allergies.

The Elissa or Elisa test is much cheaper and measures IgG but the Alcat people say presence of IgG antibodies doesn't accurately indicate intolerance, only exposure.

ALCAT food and environmental hypersensitivity testing:
http://www.alcat.com...i...dex&cPath=1

Various kinds of tests available to do at home, including allergy tests:
http://www.acne.org/...g-t235230.html#

Edited by alternativista, 08 March 2010 - 07:11 PM.


#25 Mr. Crab

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:47 AM

Great thread! And thanks for continuing to contribute Alternativista!

#26 alternativista

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 03:06 PM

Linking to a very valuable post (by SweetJade of course) in another allergy thread:

http://www.acne.org/...p...t&p=2311186

Includes reference to a study showing a delayed-type allergic reaction causes acne vulgaris.

#27 alternativista

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 02:11 PM

Journal articles about IgG responses/testing:

http://www.betterhea.../public/282.cfm

#28 alternativista

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 04:05 PM

Australian study finds that people who get more sun exposure (closer to equator) have fewer allergies.
http://www.abc.net.a.../11/2769736.htm

#29 alternativista

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 08:47 AM

There's a book called The Hypoallergenic diet:

On the website they state:
QUOTE
Food allergies are well-recognized in clinical medicine as a cause of acute attacks of asthma, anaphylaxis and skin eruptions, as well as a contributing factor in some cases of skin rashes, eczema and rhinitis (runny nose). These types of allergic reactions are controlled by the immune system. The immune system uses antibodies (protein complexes used by the immune system) to attack any foreign material in the body. For example in common seasonal allergies the immune system produces antibodies against flower pollens that enter the nostrils, which results in an immune reaction followed by inflammation causing hay fever and runny nose.

Allergic reaction are also part of cause of any forms of diseases with an autoimmune etiology, such as acne, psoriasis, gout, dermatitis, eczema, asthma, migraine, chronic rhinitis, arthritis and systemic lupus erythema-tosus (SLE)


Link to their chart on hypoallergenic foods and what to avoid:
http://www.hypoaller...t.com/book.html There's a few curious items in the hypoallergenic and avoid columns.

They allow all legumes except peanuts and soy, for example. As many people have difficulty with legumes, I would try avoid most for a while, but probably trust whfoods.org claim that lentils and green peas are fine. whfoods also says black beans and garbonzos are hypo-allergenic but I would like an explanation on that, especially the black beans that are part of the kidney bean family and kidney beans themselves are supposedly amongst the worst source of lectins (after wheat/gluten, soy, and peanuts).

Also want to highlight the study on inflammation and scarring that I linked to in post 22 in which as they say 'A cell-mediated immune response is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of acne, although the extent of this response has been found to differ among patients.'

Edited by alternativista, 14 April 2011 - 04:54 PM.


#30 alternativista

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Posted 29 April 2011 - 11:55 AM

So, previously I'd mentioned reading that it was the IgA antibodies that were involved in gluten intolerance. Apparently IgA antibodies are the immune system in the mucus membranes--nasal passages, mouth, digestive tract, lungs, etc. Just thought that was some interesting info. If I wanted an allergy test to determine why my nose always feels congested, I suppose that means I need to look for IgA reactions.

In this Mercola article on the evils of vaccines, he explains one reason they are bad is that injecting into the blood stream bypasses the immune system of the mucus membranes. And that system involves IgA antibodies. So you don't develop the right antibodies that will protect you when the germs enter your body the way they naturally do, through your nose or mouth and into the lungs. Which is why people still get sick despite being vaccinated. http://articles.merc...d-diseases.aspx

Edited by alternativista, 02 May 2011 - 09:56 AM.


#31 alternativista

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 01:48 PM

Term of the Day

Immunoglubulin = antibodies. It's the Ig in IgE, IgA, etc.


QUOTE
The five subclasses of antibodies are:


1. Immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is found in high concentrations in the mucous membranes, particularly those lining the respiratory passages and gastrointestinal tract, as well as in saliva and tears.
2. Immunoglobulin G (IgG), the most abundant type of antibody, is found in all body fluids and protects against bacterial and viral infections.
3. Immunoglobulin M (IgM), which is found mainly in the blood and lymph fluid, is the first to be made by the body to fight a new infection.
4. Immunoglobulin E (IgE), which is associated mainly with allergic reactions (when the immune system overreacts to environmental antigens such as pollen or pet dander). It is found in the lungs, skin, and mucous membranes.
5. Immunoglobulin D (IgD), which exists in minute amounts in the blood, is the least understood antibody.

IgA, IgG, and IgM are frequently measured simultaneously to give doctors important information about immune system functioning, especially relating to infection or autoimmune disease.


The description of IgM seems to contradict Mercola's claims somewhat.

More on IgA


QUOTE
IgA is found in high concentrations in the body's mucous membranes, particularly the respiratory passages and gastrointestinal tract, as well as in saliva and tears.


IgA also plays a role in allergic reactions. Its levels rise in response to the presence of allergens, such as pet dander, in sensitive people. IgA levels also may be high in autoimmune conditions, disorders in which the body mistakenly makes antibodies against healthy tissues.
Why It's Done

An IgA test can help doctors diagnose problems with the immune system, intestines, and kidneys. It's also used to evaluate autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and celiac disease. Kids born with low levels of IgA — or none at all — are at increased risk of developing an autoimmune condition.


From kids health site, possibly kidshealth. something. I already closed it.

Some more in IgG


QUOTE
IgG antibodies are produced for several hours or days after exposure to an allergen and are called Type III delayed hypersensitivity reactions.


In a Type III delayed hypersensitivity reaction, IgG forms an immune complex with the allergen/antigen (Ag), which activates the complement pathway and releases inflammatory mediators wherever the immune complex is deposited. This process takes anywhere from several hours to several days, which is why hypersensitivity reactions are delayed. Although macrophages pick up the IgG-Ag complexes immediately, they have a finite capacity to do so. If there are a lot of antigens present, the macrophages may saturate their capacity to remove the immune complexes, causing the excess to be deposited in tissue. Depending on which tissues are involved, deposition of these IgG-Ag complexes may result in the following health concerns:

* Vascular deposition: headaches, vasculitis or hypertension
* Respiratory tissue deposition: alveolitis, asthma and recurrent infections
* Skin deposition: dermatologic conditions
* Joint deposition: joint pain
* Rhinitis and angioedema may occur as a result of histamine release by immune complexes

IgG allergies are difficult to diagnose because reactions do not occur until hours or days after ingestion of an allergen. This makes it extremely difficult to determine which foods are the causative agents. Blood spot testing for IgG provides a simple and practical means for practitioners to uncover potential causes of allergic reactions and allergy related disease. For detailed information on sample collection, go to the Test Specification Sheet.

From a testing lab: http://www.rmalab.com/index.php?id=18

Study showing relationship between IgG antibodies due to a food intolerance and Migraines:
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18693538

IgG Food Allergy Testing by ELISA/EIA What do they really tell us?

Edited by alternativista, 29 December 2011 - 10:55 AM.


#32 alternativista

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 10:58 AM

Another site with info on the various types of food intolerances such as

histamine 'liberating' foods. Foods that stimulate a release of histamine from mast cells without having anything to do with antibodies. 'Foods that have been implicated in this type of reaction include Egg white, shellfish, strawberries, chocolate, citrus fruit, tomatoes, fish and pork meat. The histamine liberated in this reaction will cause symptoms that may mimic true food allergy.'

Vaso-active Amines in food – naturally occuring histamine. 'Histamine like substances occur naturally in foods and can trigger symptoms that mimic allergy. This is particularly true of fermented foods that contain high quantities of the vaso-active amines such as Histamine, Phenylethylamine, Serotonin, Tyramine and Dopamine.'

'Histamine is contained in a number of foods. It occurs in 3 cheeses (Blue, Roquefort and Parmesan), 2 vegetables (Spinach and Aubergine), 2 red wines (Chianti and Burgundy) and yeast extract or Marmite. Tyramine is found in Camembert and cheddar cheese, pickled herring, fermented sauces like bean and Soya, and in chicken livers. Serotonin is in banana, kiwi fruit, pineapple, tomato, walnuts, figs, plum and even seafood such as octopus. Symptoms of vaso-active amine ingestion are cramping, flushing, headache, palpitations and hypotension. The symptoms are usually dose related and occur when the histamine metabolising enzyme diamine oxidase is saturated and cannot metabolise the histamine ingested. '

And much more on things like cross reactions, exercise induced reactions to foods that don't cause a reaction when at rest, etc.:

http://www.allergy-c...od-and-allergy/


Edited by alternativista, 10 October 2013 - 04:59 PM.


#33 Dotty1

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 11:59 AM

QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 5 2008, 10:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
source: http://www.spherios....dallergies.html



Food Allergies and Sensitivities

Definition

An allergic reaction is an immune response to a foreign substance (antigen) that results in inflammation and organ dysfunction. Allergens can be chemical, environmental or food-based. In people with food allergies/sensitivities, an immediate or delayed adverse reaction by the immune system can occur to a food that most people find harmless.

Food Allergy
A food allergy is a classic antigen-antibody response to a particular food (IgG or IgE are the usual antibodies involved).

Food Sensitivity
A food sensitivity is an adverse reaction to a food with no antigen-antibody response.

1. Immediate: IgE-Mediated Response
An IgE-mediated allergic response is an immediate reaction within two hours after eating food. IgEmediated reactions are mainly seen in airborne allergies (pollens, dusts and weeds), and are not seen as often in food allergies.

MODE OF ACTION: IgE antibodies attach to mast cells that are mainly found in the air passages, blood and skin. When an allergen enters the body, the mast cells release substances (i.e. histamine) to ward off the allergen.
2. Delayed: IgG-Mediated Response
An IgG-mediated reaction is a delayed response, usually 36-72 hours after exposure to an antigen. IgG-mediated reactions are seen in most food allergies. The delayed response makes it difficult to pin down the specific food allergy.

MODE OF ACTION: A different type of mast cell is found in the connective tissue lining the intestinal tract. A food allergy reaction starts in the digestive tract, triggered by a free-floating antibody called secretory IgA. Secretory IgA functions to protect the lining of the small intestine by secreting a thick protective coating of mucus from the mucosal lining when it comes in contact with a food allergen. If the food is eaten repeatedly, the immune system is overtaxed and the amount of secretory IgA antibodies produced is decreased. This allows the food to come in contact with the mast cells and triggers the release of toxic chemical mediators (histamine, leukotrienes, inflammatory prostaglandins, etc.). Over the long term, the inflammatory prostaglandins decrease HCl (hydrochloric acid) secretion, which triggers the pancreas to underproduce bicarbonates and pancreatic enzymes. Also, the chemical mediators weaken the mucosal membrane of the intestinal wall and allow partially digested food to pass into the bloodstream. The IgG antibody attempts to clear these macromolecules from the bloodstream, but if overwhelmed, these macromolecules (immune complexes) penetrate the capillary walls and are deposited in the tissues. Inflammation is produced wherever the immune complexes are deposited. (Braly, J., M.D., Dr. Braly's Food Allergy and Nutrition Revolution. 1992. Keats Publishing, Inc., New Canaan, CT., pp. 69-72).

Signs and Symptoms

1. Immediate: IgE-Mediated Response I don't have these...
- Anaphylactic shock (most severe)
- Rash.
- Wheezing.
- Hives.
- Swelling.
- Anxiety.
- Difficulty swallowing.
2. Delayed Reactions: (IgG-Mediated Response) I DO however have a some of these, the colored ones
- Gastrointestinal complaints including stomach pains, heartburn, excess gas, chronic diarrhea/constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcers and malabsorption problems
- Dark circles under the eyes.
- Sinusitis.
- Itching.
- Chronic fatigue.

- Edema.
- Joint/muscle pain.
- Puffy eyes.
- Acne.
- Anxiety/depression.

- Chronic swollen glands.
- Eczema.
- Insomnia.
- Headaches (migraines).

- Hives.
- Asthma.
- Wheezing.
- Hyperactivity.
- Bedwetting.
- Canker sores.
- Arthritis.
- Chronic infections.
- Frequent ear infections.
- Irritability.

3.
NOTE: Offending foods can be masked because eating the food can actually make the person feel better initially. (interesting!) Endorphins, which are produced in response to the inflammation, can cover up ill feelings. If a person stops eating the offending food, they will feel withdrawal symptoms (lasting approximately one to five days). Thus, they unconsciously crave the allergy food(s) in order to avoid the withdrawal symptoms. Frequently, a person's favorite foods are the allergy foods. Also, certain foods may work synergistically, meaning they will produce symptoms when eaten together, but not when eaten alone (i.e. eggs and apples).

Possible Causes or Contributing Factors

1. Weakened immune system - may be due to increased T-cell levels because of the constant internal battle, which causes allergic reactions to be triggered more quickly.
2. Environmental toxins (metals, chemicals, other pollutants) can increase the susceptibility to allergies
3. Repetitive immunizations or antibiotic/steroidal medication that decrease immune response and disturb the normal gastrointestinal flora can increase risk of food allergies
4. Dysbiosis such as candida, parasites, fungi, etc., decrease efficiency of the gut mucosa and increase the potential for allergies
5. Children born to parents with allergies have an increased chance of developing allergies themselves
6. Repetitive ingestion of a small variety of foods (monotonous diet) causes the body to become sensitized to the foods.
7. Genetic manipulation of foods and chemicals/pesticides added to foods increases the potential of food allergies
8. Nutritional deficiencies can increase the potential of food allergies.
9. Leaky gut syndrome can cause partially digested foods, virus and bacteria to enter the blood and cause immune responses. Leaky gut is caused by weak digestion, NSAIDS, infections, alcohol abuse, nutritional deficiencies, drug/medication use or abuse, dysbiosis, stress, premature birth and radiation. The inflammation from a food allergy can open holes in the gut lining through tight junctions. NOTE: NSAIDS increase the possibility of food sensitivities because they increase permeability and the ability of food particles to cross the gut mucosa into the bloodstream.
10. Stress and physical and/or emotional trauma can be due to decreased immune function, adrenal response and possibly decreased HCl production. Allergy sufferers, "seem to have a significantly lowered threshold to stress, in part because of the physiological and psychological overstimulation of their adrenals" (Braly, J., M.D., Dr. Braly's Food Allergy and Nutrition Revolution. 1992. Keats Publishing, Inc., New Canaan, CT., pp. 68-69). One study showed that in solving a simple math problem, Type A personalities (tense, impatient, ambitious) have forty times as much cortisol and three times as much adrenaline circulating in the blood as Type B (more relaxed) people solving the same problem (Ibid, pp. 68-69).
11. Lower IgA levels (IgA protects the mucosa of the intestinal tract) increases the possibility of food allergies.
12. Poor digestion (i.e. decreased HCl production, pancreatic enzyme deficiency, gallbladder problems) increases the possibility of food allergies. Food sensitivities are frequently associated with low HCl levels.
13. Poor liver function can increase food allergies due to its role in removing foreign protein from the body and detoxifying the system.
14. Premature babies have increased risk due to underdeveloped gastrointestinal tract.
15. Premature weaning of infants to solid foods when the gastrointestinal tract is not fully developed increases the potential of food allergies. Baby formulas and cow's milk contain large molecules that are difficult for the baby to digest. Also, not breastfeeding can be a trigger for potential food allergens because of decreased protective factors from mother's milk.
16. Food additives (i.e. yellow dye #5 (tartrazine) and benzoates), which have been shown to increase the number of mast cells produced in the body, can increase the susceptibility to allergies.
17. Poor thyroid function increases allergy potential.

Copyright 1998-2004 HealthQuest, Inc.


You are gluten intolerant and that is obvious. The classic signs of the disease are canker sores, depression, irritability, chronic infections, joint pain and the other symptoms you listed.

You should get yourself tested by EnteroLab for $130.

Edited by Dotty1, 27 May 2011 - 12:03 PM.


#34 Dotty1

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 12:10 PM

QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 7 2008, 01:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
oh, well, BIG SHOCK lol, i tested negative for wheat/soy/chocolate IgE allergies. that doesn't surprise me because.. I don't have the IgE symptoms! I really hope they'll do and ELISA or ALCAT or something..


Okay, how do they test you for gluten intolerance?

If it was the traditional Celiac Blood test, it has an accuracy rate of around 30% (or LESS). No one I know has been accurately diagnosed by that test. I tested negative and so did all my friends who now know they are severe Celiacs.

If it was an allergy test, allergy tests cannot diagnose gluten intolerance.

The only decent test available is a stool test by EnteroLab for $130.

Edited by Dotty1, 27 May 2011 - 12:26 PM.


#35 Dotty1

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 12:18 PM

QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 10 2008, 07:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (SweetJade1980 @ Jun 10 2008, 06:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 10 2008, 03:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
my allergist wrote me back, when i asked about these tests

"Your IgE tests are equivalent to ELISA. I don't recommend ALCAT."

well.. not sure what to think about that but, looks like I won't be getting anything other than a skin test anytime soon. But if by the end of the summer I've had no luck with Differin and whatever else I try next, I'll go to one of the naturopathic doctors who do IgG tests..



OK...let's get real here. If celiac disease and sensitivity to gluten grains runs in your family....to start, regardless of what the "tests" indicate, have you given up gluten yet?

Peace


Yep! I gave up gluten about 2 months ago. so far, hasn't really had a noticeable effect on my skin. nonetheless, I much prefer gluten free, and it's really easy to do in my house smile.gif I get tested for celiac disease about once a year.



You aren't gluten intolerant, you are grain intolerant.

I am a Celiac with severe acne and my acne did not go away on a gluten-free diet. After MUCH research, I noticed that all the Celiacs on the Celiac message boards who are "gluten-free" are not healing -- they are all complaining of health problems as if they are still eating gluten. I noticed that Celiacs who cut grains out of their diets were the only ones saying "I'VE HEALED!!"

I then discovered the Gluten Free Society that advocates a grain-free diet for Celiacs. They say that Celiacs are actually intolerant to all grains.

My skin was still horrible on the gluten-free diet so I decided to go grain-free. Within 2 months, my skin has healed by 90%.

Here is a lecture by the Gluten Free Society:
http://www.glutenfre...ity-what-is-it/

Also, here is a blog by a Celiac who was not healing on a traditional gluten-free diet. She then went grain-free and documented her results:

"My IGG level dropped from the 70's initially [after beginning a gluten-free diet], but never got any lower than 33. My doctor suggested in 2005 that if the IGG level was still in the 30's after a couple years on the diet, it probably would not improve, and I most likely had some permanent damage from the disease that kept it still high. So I stopped testing at that point, deciding it was not worth the cost to track my progress. Out of curiosity, I decided to retest these antibodies again [after a grain-free diet] and to my amazement, my IGG level was at a 2, the lowest it has been since diagnosis and within normal range which is 0-19. This was exciting news.

Also, her absorption levels increased:
"Ferritin previously at 26 was now 73 (normal 10-291)
Vitamin B12 previously at 320 was now 451 (normal 211-911)
Vitamin D previously at 33.1 was now 39.2 (normal 4.8-52.8)"

Link to her blog: http://www.pdxgluten...ned-i-have.html

Edited by Dotty1, 27 May 2011 - 12:58 PM.


#36 alternativista

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Posted 29 May 2011 - 11:16 AM

You are having a conversation with someone who hasn't been around in quite a while.

#37 alternativista

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 06:42 PM

Just wanted to comment that we've long had a lot of talk about Type I immediate responses and Type III delayed responses both of which involve antibodies. But a lot of acne and related studies I've read lately have mentioned Type IV delayed responses which are cell-mediated responses and don't involve antibodies. Some of the excerpts posted here earlier mention cell-mediated inflammatory responses being part of the pathogenesis of acne.

This recent report from various acne authorities on supposedly recent advances in the pathogenesis of acne mention Type IV Cell Mediated Responses.

http://www.acne.org/...-P-t298075.html

And this study that concludes that there is some delayed type response at the root of acne:
http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum

Edited by alternativista, 29 March 2012 - 09:43 AM.


#38 alternativista

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 02:36 PM

Sweetjade post listing how she has identified that various foods to which she is intolerant cause acne in specific places. Just like with me and my cysts from citrus. Supporting my guess that acne that appears within a day or two after eating a food and/or recurs in the same place, tends to be an allergic reaction. http://www.acne.org/...55#entry2124255

Also, talk about Type III and Type IV reactions. And the amino acid taurine countering the inflammation caused by these reactions.

Edited by alternativista, 04 July 2011 - 02:36 PM.


#39 FaceValues

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 06:09 PM


QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 5 2008, 10:14 PM)
source: http://www.spherios....dallergies.html




Food Allergies and Sensitivities

Definition

An allergic reaction is an immune response to a foreign substance (antigen) that results in inflammation and organ dysfunction. Allergens can be chemical, environmental or food-based. In people with food allergies/sensitivities, an immediate or delayed adverse reaction by the immune system can occur to a food that most people find harmless.

Food Allergy
A food allergy is a classic antigen-antibody response to a particular food (IgG or IgE are the usual antibodies involved).

Food Sensitivity
A food sensitivity is an adverse reaction to a food with no antigen-antibody response.

1. Immediate: IgE-Mediated Response
An IgE-mediated allergic response is an immediate reaction within two hours after eating food. IgEmediated reactions are mainly seen in airborne allergies (pollens, dusts and weeds), and are not seen as often in food allergies.

MODE OF ACTION: IgE antibodies attach to mast cells that are mainly found in the air passages, blood and skin. When an allergen enters the body, the mast cells release substances (i.e. histamine) to ward off the allergen.
2. Delayed: IgG-Mediated Response
An IgG-mediated reaction is a delayed response, usually 36-72 hours after exposure to an antigen. IgG-mediated reactions are seen in most food allergies. The delayed response makes it difficult to pin down the specific food allergy.

MODE OF ACTION: A different type of mast cell is found in the connective tissue lining the intestinal tract. A food allergy reaction starts in the digestive tract, triggered by a free-floating antibody called secretory IgA. Secretory IgA functions to protect the lining of the small intestine by secreting a thick protective coating of mucus from the mucosal lining when it comes in contact with a food allergen. If the food is eaten repeatedly, the immune system is overtaxed and the amount of secretory IgA antibodies produced is decreased. This allows the food to come in contact with the mast cells and triggers the release of toxic chemical mediators (histamine, leukotrienes, inflammatory prostaglandins, etc.). Over the long term, the inflammatory prostaglandins decrease HCl (hydrochloric acid) secretion, which triggers the pancreas to underproduce bicarbonates and pancreatic enzymes. Also, the chemical mediators weaken the mucosal membrane of the intestinal wall and allow partially digested food to pass into the bloodstream. The IgG antibody attempts to clear these macromolecules from the bloodstream, but if overwhelmed, these macromolecules (immune complexes) penetrate the capillary walls and are deposited in the tissues. Inflammation is produced wherever the immune complexes are deposited. (Braly, J., M.D., Dr. Braly's Food Allergy and Nutrition Revolution. 1992. Keats Publishing, Inc., New Canaan, CT., pp. 69-72).

Signs and Symptoms

1. Immediate: IgE-Mediated Response I don't have these...
- Anaphylactic shock (most severe)
- Rash.
- Wheezing.
- Hives.
- Swelling.
- Anxiety.
- Difficulty swallowing.
2. Delayed Reactions: (IgG-Mediated Response) I DO however have a some of these, the colored ones
- Gastrointestinal complaints including stomach pains, heartburn, excess gas, chronic diarrhea/constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcers and malabsorption problems
- Dark circles under the eyes.
- Sinusitis.
- Itching.
- Chronic fatigue.
- Edema.
- Joint/muscle pain.
- Puffy eyes.
- Acne.
- Anxiety/depression.
- Chronic swollen glands.
- Eczema.
- Insomnia.
- Headaches (migraines).
- Hives.
- Asthma.
- Wheezing.
- Hyperactivity.
- Bedwetting.
- Canker sores.
- Arthritis.
- Chronic infections.
- Frequent ear infections.
- Irritability.
3.
NOTE: Offending foods can be masked because eating the food can actually make the person feel better initially. (interesting!) Endorphins, which are produced in response to the inflammation, can cover up ill feelings. If a person stops eating the offending food, they will feel withdrawal symptoms (lasting approximately one to five days). Thus, they unconsciously crave the allergy food(s) in order to avoid the withdrawal symptoms. Frequently, a person's favorite foods are the allergy foods. Also, certain foods may work synergistically, meaning they will produce symptoms when eaten together, but not when eaten alone (i.e. eggs and apples).

Possible Causes or Contributing Factors

1. Weakened immune system - may be due to increased T-cell levels because of the constant internal battle, which causes allergic reactions to be triggered more quickly.
2. Environmental toxins (metals, chemicals, other pollutants) can increase the susceptibility to allergies
3. Repetitive immunizations or antibiotic/steroidal medication that decrease immune response and disturb the normal gastrointestinal flora can increase risk of food allergies
4. Dysbiosis such as candida, parasites, fungi, etc., decrease efficiency of the gut mucosa and increase the potential for allergies
5. Children born to parents with allergies have an increased chance of developing allergies themselves
6. Repetitive ingestion of a small variety of foods (monotonous diet) causes the body to become sensitized to the foods.
7. Genetic manipulation of foods and chemicals/pesticides added to foods increases the potential of food allergies
8. Nutritional deficiencies can increase the potential of food allergies.
9. Leaky gut syndrome can cause partially digested foods, virus and bacteria to enter the blood and cause immune responses. Leaky gut is caused by weak digestion, NSAIDS, infections, alcohol abuse, nutritional deficiencies, drug/medication use or abuse, dysbiosis, stress, premature birth and radiation. The inflammation from a food allergy can open holes in the gut lining through tight junctions. NOTE: NSAIDS increase the possibility of food sensitivities because they increase permeability and the ability of food particles to cross the gut mucosa into the bloodstream.
10. Stress and physical and/or emotional trauma can be due to decreased immune function, adrenal response and possibly decreased HCl production. Allergy sufferers, "seem to have a significantly lowered threshold to stress, in part because of the physiological and psychological overstimulation of their adrenals" (Braly, J., M.D., Dr. Braly's Food Allergy and Nutrition Revolution. 1992. Keats Publishing, Inc., New Canaan, CT., pp. 68-69). One study showed that in solving a simple math problem, Type A personalities (tense, impatient, ambitious) have forty times as much cortisol and three times as much adrenaline circulating in the blood as Type B (more relaxed) people solving the same problem (Ibid, pp. 68-69).
11. Lower IgA levels (IgA protects the mucosa of the intestinal tract) increases the possibility of food allergies.
12. Poor digestion (i.e. decreased HCl production, pancreatic enzyme deficiency, gallbladder problems) increases the possibility of food allergies. Food sensitivities are frequently associated with low HCl levels.
13. Poor liver function can increase food allergies due to its role in removing foreign protein from the body and detoxifying the system.
14. Premature babies have increased risk due to underdeveloped gastrointestinal tract.
15. Premature weaning of infants to solid foods when the gastrointestinal tract is not fully developed increases the potential of food allergies. Baby formulas and cow's milk contain large molecules that are difficult for the baby to digest. Also, not breastfeeding can be a trigger for potential food allergens because of decreased protective factors from mother's milk.
16. Food additives (i.e. yellow dye #5 (tartrazine) and benzoates), which have been shown to increase the number of mast cells produced in the body, can increase the susceptibility to allergies.
17. Poor thyroid function increases allergy potential.

Copyright 1998-2004 HealthQuest, Inc.


You are gluten intolerant and that is obvious. The classic signs of the disease are canker sores, depression, irritability, chronic infections, joint pain and the other symptoms you listed.

You should get yourself tested by EnteroLab for $130.


Where is the link for this test? I tried googling it but am unable to find a food allergy test for that price.

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 02:06 AM

this really intrigues me. Who does these IGE tests? I don't think my insurance covers it. How much does it cost?




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