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what i found about IgE vs. IgG food allergies..

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#1 baby pink

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 11:14 PM

source: http://www.spherios....dallergies.html


Food Allergies and Sensitivities

Definition

An allergic reaction is an immune response to a foreign substance (antigen) that results in inflammation and organ dysfunction. Allergens can be chemical, environmental or food-based. In people with food allergies/sensitivities, an immediate or delayed adverse reaction by the immune system can occur to a food that most people find harmless.

Food Allergy
A food allergy is a classic antigen-antibody response to a particular food (IgG or IgE are the usual antibodies involved).

Food Sensitivity
A food sensitivity is an adverse reaction to a food with no antigen-antibody response.

1. Immediate: IgE-Mediated Response
An IgE-mediated allergic response is an immediate reaction within two hours after eating food. IgEmediated reactions are mainly seen in airborne allergies (pollens, dusts and weeds), and are not seen as often in food allergies.

MODE OF ACTION: IgE antibodies attach to mast cells that are mainly found in the air passages, blood and skin. When an allergen enters the body, the mast cells release substances (i.e. histamine) to ward off the allergen.
2. Delayed: IgG-Mediated Response
An IgG-mediated reaction is a delayed response, usually 36-72 hours after exposure to an antigen. IgG-mediated reactions are seen in most food allergies. The delayed response makes it difficult to pin down the specific food allergy.

MODE OF ACTION: A different type of mast cell is found in the connective tissue lining the intestinal tract. A food allergy reaction starts in the digestive tract, triggered by a free-floating antibody called secretory IgA. Secretory IgA functions to protect the lining of the small intestine by secreting a thick protective coating of mucus from the mucosal lining when it comes in contact with a food allergen. If the food is eaten repeatedly, the immune system is overtaxed and the amount of secretory IgA antibodies produced is decreased. This allows the food to come in contact with the mast cells and triggers the release of toxic chemical mediators (histamine, leukotrienes, inflammatory prostaglandins, etc.). Over the long term, the inflammatory prostaglandins decrease HCl (hydrochloric acid) secretion, which triggers the pancreas to underproduce bicarbonates and pancreatic enzymes. Also, the chemical mediators weaken the mucosal membrane of the intestinal wall and allow partially digested food to pass into the bloodstream. The IgG antibody attempts to clear these macromolecules from the bloodstream, but if overwhelmed, these macromolecules (immune complexes) penetrate the capillary walls and are deposited in the tissues. Inflammation is produced wherever the immune complexes are deposited. (Braly, J., M.D., Dr. Braly's Food Allergy and Nutrition Revolution. 1992. Keats Publishing, Inc., New Canaan, CT., pp. 69-72).

Signs and Symptoms

1. Immediate: IgE-Mediated Response I don't have these...
- Anaphylactic shock (most severe)
- Rash.
- Wheezing.
- Hives.
- Swelling.
- Anxiety.
- Difficulty swallowing.
2. Delayed Reactions: (IgG-Mediated Response) I DO however have a some of these, the colored ones
- Gastrointestinal complaints including stomach pains, heartburn, excess gas, chronic diarrhea/constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcers and malabsorption problems
- Dark circles under the eyes.
- Sinusitis.
- Itching.
- Chronic fatigue.
- Edema.
- Joint/muscle pain.
- Puffy eyes.
- Acne.
- Anxiety/depression.
- Chronic swollen glands.
- Eczema.
- Insomnia.
- Headaches (migraines).
- Hives.
- Asthma.
- Wheezing.
- Hyperactivity.
- Bedwetting.
- Canker sores.
- Arthritis.
- Chronic infections.
- Frequent ear infections.
- Irritability.

NOTE: Offending foods can be masked because eating the food can actually make the person feel better initially. (interesting!) Endorphins, which are produced in response to the inflammation, can cover up ill feelings. If a person stops eating the offending food, they will feel withdrawal symptoms (lasting approximately one to five days). Thus, they unconsciously crave the allergy food(s) in order to avoid the withdrawal symptoms. Frequently, a person's favorite foods are the allergy foods. Also, certain foods may work synergistically, meaning they will produce symptoms when eaten together, but not when eaten alone (i.e. eggs and apples).

Possible Causes or Contributing Factors

1. Weakened immune system - may be due to increased T-cell levels because of the constant internal battle, which causes allergic reactions to be triggered more quickly.
2. Environmental toxins (metals, chemicals, other pollutants) can increase the susceptibility to allergies
3. Repetitive immunizations or antibiotic/steroidal medication that decrease immune response and disturb the normal gastrointestinal flora can increase risk of food allergies
4. Dysbiosis such as candida, parasites, fungi, etc., decrease efficiency of the gut mucosa and increase the potential for allergies
5. Children born to parents with allergies have an increased chance of developing allergies themselves
6. Repetitive ingestion of a small variety of foods (monotonous diet) causes the body to become sensitized to the foods.
7. Genetic manipulation of foods and chemicals/pesticides added to foods increases the potential of food allergies
8. Nutritional deficiencies can increase the potential of food allergies.
9. Leaky gut syndrome can cause partially digested foods, virus and bacteria to enter the blood and cause immune responses. Leaky gut is caused by weak digestion, NSAIDS, infections, alcohol abuse, nutritional deficiencies, drug/medication use or abuse, dysbiosis, stress, premature birth and radiation. The inflammation from a food allergy can open holes in the gut lining through tight junctions. NOTE: NSAIDS increase the possibility of food sensitivities because they increase permeability and the ability of food particles to cross the gut mucosa into the bloodstream.
10. Stress and physical and/or emotional trauma can be due to decreased immune function, adrenal response and possibly decreased HCl production. Allergy sufferers, "seem to have a significantly lowered threshold to stress, in part because of the physiological and psychological overstimulation of their adrenals" (Braly, J., M.D., Dr. Braly's Food Allergy and Nutrition Revolution. 1992. Keats Publishing, Inc., New Canaan, CT., pp. 68-69). One study showed that in solving a simple math problem, Type A personalities (tense, impatient, ambitious) have forty times as much cortisol and three times as much adrenaline circulating in the blood as Type B (more relaxed) people solving the same problem (Ibid, pp. 68-69).
11. Lower IgA levels (IgA protects the mucosa of the intestinal tract) increases the possibility of food allergies.
12. Poor digestion (i.e. decreased HCl production, pancreatic enzyme deficiency, gallbladder problems) increases the possibility of food allergies. Food sensitivities are frequently associated with low HCl levels.
13. Poor liver function can increase food allergies due to its role in removing foreign protein from the body and detoxifying the system.
14. Premature babies have increased risk due to underdeveloped gastrointestinal tract.
15. Premature weaning of infants to solid foods when the gastrointestinal tract is not fully developed increases the potential of food allergies. Baby formulas and cow's milk contain large molecules that are difficult for the baby to digest. Also, not breastfeeding can be a trigger for potential food allergens because of decreased protective factors from mother's milk.
16. Food additives (i.e. yellow dye #5 (tartrazine) and benzoates), which have been shown to increase the number of mast cells produced in the body, can increase the susceptibility to allergies.
17. Poor thyroid function increases allergy potential.

Copyright 1998-2004 HealthQuest, Inc.

#2 alternativista

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 04:58 PM

Nice list. Sweetjade posts info on the different kinds of reactions all the time, but I don't think I've ever seen that list of symptoms.

I have sinusitis or rhinitis, dark circles, headaches, and had acne. I don't know about chronic fatigue but haven't often felt particularly energetic in a long time. And maybe canker sores. I have gotten sores in my mouth a few times.

And the rhintitis/sinutis, dark circles and headaches really haven't gotten much better from any diet changes I've made. I don't take medications for sinus any more though. But that could either mean they never worked anyway or that I am a bit better.

I've been avoiding cow dairy for over 2 weeks now with no clear improvement.

-----------------------------------
Edit to note that sometime since 2008 when this post was made, I figured out that at most of my headaches are caused by neck tension and are posture related. You need to keep your head aligned with your spine which is hard to do while working at a computer and most other tasks. About the only time I have good posture is when walking. And the remaining headaches occur with barometric changes.

I've also found that rhinitis might be linked to hyperkeratinization. And I avoided all dairy for over a month with no noticeable impact. I now have limited amounts of fermented dairy like yogurt, goat cheese, small amounts of flavorful cheeses.

#3 baby pink

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 10:03 AM

QUOTE (alternativista @ Jun 6 2008, 04:58 PM)
Nice list. Sweetjade posts info on the different kinds of reactions all the time, but I don't think I've ever seen that list of symptoms.


I have sinusitis or rhinitis, dark circles, headaches, and had acne. I don't know about chronic fatigue but haven't often felt particularly energetic in a long time. And maybe canker sores. I do get sores in my mouth sometimes.

And those really haven't gotten much better from any diet changes I've made. I don't take medications for sinus any more though. I've been avoiding cow dairy for over 2 weeks now with no clear improvement.


yeah I haven't had dairy in years. I actually went from drinking lots of milk to drinking lots of soy milk, so I worry they're both bad for me. Going off dairy didn't really make a difference. But I'm really going to demand a comprehensive IgG allergy test. I just want a list of like 25 foods or something to stay away from hopefully that'll start to make a difference. cause right now I'm just experimenting with diet changes having no idea if I'm doing more harm than good..

#4 baby pink

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 02:30 PM

oh, well, BIG SHOCK lol, i tested negative for wheat/soy/chocolate IgE allergies. that doesn't surprise me because.. I don't have the IgE symptoms! I really hope they'll do and ELISA or ALCAT or something..

#5 SweetJade1980

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 09:42 PM

QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 7 2008, 02:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
oh, well, BIG SHOCK lol, i tested negative for wheat/soy/chocolate IgE allergies. that doesn't surprise me because.. I don't have the IgE symptoms! I really hope they'll do and ELISA or ALCAT or something..



If you get an ELISA or ALCAT (preferred), do let us know what happens! eusa_angel.gif

#6 baby pink

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 07:07 PM

QUOTE (SweetJade1980 @ Jun 8 2008, 10:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 7 2008, 02:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
oh, well, BIG SHOCK lol, i tested negative for wheat/soy/chocolate IgE allergies. that doesn't surprise me because.. I don't have the IgE symptoms! I really hope they'll do and ELISA or ALCAT or something..



If you get an ELISA or ALCAT (preferred), do let us know what happens! eusa_angel.gif


I will! I have a skin test and then an appointment with the allergist on Thursday. I emailed some naturopathic doctors in my town and one replied.. said they did the test at their office for $550 not covered by insurance.. but they did say having this done was "essential to getting IBS, acne, and fatigue under control" so I'll ask the allergist on Thursday if they can do this at the clinic. I'll just come straight out and say I've been reading about IgG allergies and ELISA and ALCAT and it might be worth it for me to try. Hopefully insurance can cover it.

#7 baby pink

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 03:54 PM

my allergist wrote me back, when i asked about these tests

"Your IgE tests are equivalent to ELISA. I don't recommend ALCAT."

well.. not sure what to think about that but, looks like I won't be getting anything other than a skin test anytime soon. But if by the end of the summer I've had no luck with Differin and whatever else I try next, I'll go to one of the naturopathic doctors who do IgG tests..

#8 SweetJade1980

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 06:21 PM

QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 10 2008, 03:54 PM)
my allergist wrote me back, when i asked about these tests


"Your IgE tests are equivalent to ELISA. I don't recommend ALCAT."

well.. not sure what to think about that but, looks like I won't be getting anything other than a skin test anytime soon. But if by the end of the summer I've had no luck with Differin and whatever else I try next, I'll go to one of the naturopathic doctors who do IgG tests..



OK...let's get real here. If celiac disease and sensitivity to gluten grains runs in your family....to start, regardless of what the "tests" indicate, have you given up gluten yet?

Peace

#9 baby pink

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 08:53 PM

QUOTE (SweetJade1980 @ Jun 10 2008, 06:21 PM)

QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 10 2008, 03:54 PM)
my allergist wrote me back, when i asked about these tests


"Your IgE tests are equivalent to ELISA. I don't recommend ALCAT."

well.. not sure what to think about that but, looks like I won't be getting anything other than a skin test anytime soon. But if by the end of the summer I've had no luck with Differin and whatever else I try next, I'll go to one of the naturopathic doctors who do IgG tests..



OK...let's get real here. If celiac disease and sensitivity to gluten grains runs in your family....to start, regardless of what the "tests" indicate, have you given up gluten yet?

Peace



Yep! I gave up gluten about 2 months ago. so far, hasn't really had a noticeable effect on my skin. nonetheless, I much prefer gluten free, and it's really easy to do in my house Posted Image I get tested for celiac disease about once a year.

#10 SweetJade1980

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 09:21 PM

QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 10 2008, 07:53 PM)

QUOTE (SweetJade1980 @ Jun 10 2008, 06:21 PM)

QUOTE (baby pink @ Jun 10 2008, 03:54 PM)
my allergist wrote me back, when i asked about these tests


"Your IgE tests are equivalent to ELISA. I don't recommend ALCAT."

well.. not sure what to think about that but, looks like I won't be getting anything other than a skin test anytime soon. But if by the end of the summer I've had no luck with Differin and whatever else I try next, I'll go to one of the naturopathic doctors who do IgG tests..



OK...let's get real here. If celiac disease and sensitivity to gluten grains runs in your family....to start, regardless of what the "tests" indicate, have you given up gluten yet?

Peace



Yep! I gave up gluten about 2 months ago. so far, hasn't really had a noticeable effect on my skin. nonetheless, I much prefer gluten free, and it's really easy to do in my house Posted Image I get tested for celiac disease about once a year.




For your future health, that's good To hear....although...when you get tested for CD....won't you have to consume some gluten in order to see how your body responds?

Anyway, what about Dairy? or Corn? I remember reading something by one member of celiac forum that said her acne didn't clear until she gave up corn.

Then again, it's really tough to know what works but avoidance is the cheapest method...especially when you consider that your "allergist" isn't going to provide you with the most optimal testing method to determine any hidden hypersenstivities you may have.

#11 baby pink

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 10:41 PM

For your future health, that's good To hear....although...when you get tested for CD....won't you have to consume some gluten in order to see how your body responds?

Anyway, what about Dairy? or Corn? I remember reading something by one member of celiac forum that said her acne didn't clear until she gave up corn.

Then again, it's really tough to know what works but avoidance is the cheapest method...especially when you consider that your "allergist" isn't going to provide you with the most optimal testing method to determine any hidden hypersenstivities you may have.


I've been off dairy for about 5 years Posted Image and I gave up corn a couple weeks ago. Maybe that'll start helping. The same sister also has corn and soy allergies. My IgE test for soy allergies was totally negative. I do have soy though, which is why I worried that soy may be an allergen for me.. but it's like, how do I really know what I'm allergic to until I get tested? If all the topicals and supplements I'm trying really show no effect by the end of the summer, I'll go to a naturopathic doctor (two have now emailed me back saying they do IgG tests) but right now I honestly can't put down five or six hundred dollars for the test.

I get tested for celiac at the local clinic, Palo Alto Medical Foundation --www.pamf.org. And yes, I have to have been eating gluten for like two weeks prior. But my giving up gluten totally has only been in the last couple months. I was eating gluten up until recently. The thing with me is that I have the gene, so lots of things could trigger it. So I get tested pretty often. All they've been able to tell me now though is that I have "severe IBS." heh, helpful right? and the only medication that has helped even a little bit for that is ambien, and that's just to reduce the symptoms at night so I can sleep. I certainly can't be taking that all day..

I'm sure I have hidden food sensitivities, given all my symptoms. Or some medical condition that they haven't thought to test me for. From reading these message boards and people talking about what they have I seem to have symptoms of like 20 different things but the trouble is, how can I know?

#12 alternativista

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 01:35 PM

Well, I've tried eliminating Dairy and grains each for over a month with no improvement to sinuses, headaches and other symptoms. So soon I'm going to begin a more strict elimination plan in which I eat only from the below list of foods that few people are allergic to and begin adding in one by one other foods.

List of Hypoallergenic Foods from World's Healthiest Foods book. (For some reason, they cover this much more simply and to the point in the book than on the website. You think it would be the other way around.)

Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Collard Greens
Green Beans
Green Peas
Kale
Lettuce
Summer Squash (Zucchini)
Sweet Potatoes
Swiss Chard
Winter Squash
Sea Vegetables

Garlic and Onions
Olive Oil

Apples
Grapes
Lemons*
Pears

Brown Rice
Black Beans
Garbanzos
Lentils
Pumpkin seeds
Sesame Seeds
Sunflower seeds

Cod
Wild Salmon
Lamb

Notes:
-Many people with a damage digestive tract and/or extremely intolerant should avoid all grains. legumes, nuts, seeds until they heal. And many are cross contaminated with gluten grains. Some won't see any improvement from only avoiding the gluten grains.
-Lamb is on that list because it is almost always from pastured animals fed no grains. If you can find products from other animals raised that way or wild they are probably fine.
-Make sure the Salmon is wild, not farmed.
-Cherries, like other stone fruit should be organic and we've had some people here that break out from stone fruit. I don't know that they've methodically verified that they react to every stone fruit or if they can have cherries. Almonds belong to the same family.
-I get cysts from oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, and key limes, but I've been able to use quite a bit of lemon and other limes without a problem.
-Some people have difficulty digesting legumes, so you might want to avoid those for a period as well. And when you add them in, make them yourself from dried beans and soaked at least overnight. And black beans belong to the kidney bean family and kidney beans are considered high in lectins so their inclusion in a list of hypo-allergenic foods is confusing, only consume if you soak and cook properly. More info on lectins and proper preparation/food combos to reduce their harm: http://www.acne.org/...me-t247794.html
-Some people have issues with fructose malabsorption which can be improved with a natural circadian rhythm and certain nutrients like taurine. http://www.acne.org/...bo-t299249.html

-And I'm not sure if by 'Summer Squash (Zucchini)' they mean all summer squash with zucchini as one example of a summer squash, or they mean specifically just zucchini.

-----------------------------------------------------
List of foods sorted in their related families. Consider if you have an intolerance to one, you may have an intolerance to other members of the family.

Note: This list was copied from another members post from an unknown source. I've been modifying it, but I'm not guaranteeing it's 100% accurate. Or complete.

FOOD FAMILIES:
Apple Family: Apples and pears
Banana Family: Banana, plantains, arrowroot
Birch Family: Hazelnut, wintergreen
Blueberry Family: Blueberry, Bilberry, cranberry, huckleberry
Buckwheat family: Buckwheat, rhubarb
Cashew Family: Mango, Cashew, Pistachio, poison ivy
Cattle/Ruminant family: Beef, goat, sheep/lamb and all bi-products such as milk/cheese/whey,...
Dillenia Family: Kiwi, gooseberry and relatives
Goosefoot Family: Beet root/ greens, spinach, swiss chard, quinoa, amaranth, purslane, lambs quarters
Gourd Family: Cucumbers & pickles, melons (i.e. cantaloupe, honeydew, watermelon), All kinds of squashes (zucchini/courgettes, yellow squash, winter squashes and pumpkin)
Hordeae Family: Wheat, barley, rye, spelt, teff, farina, products like bulgur, couscous
Grape family: Grape, raisin, wine, cream of tartar
Hemp Family: Hops, Marijuana
Hickory Family - Hickory, Pecan
Laurel Family: Avocado, bay leaf, cinnamon
Lily Family: Onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots, green onions, asparagus, aloe vera
Mint Family: Basil, catnip, mint, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, sage, savory, spearmint, thyme, chia, menthol
Morning Glory Family: Sweet potato
Mulberry Family: Breadfruit, fig, mulberry
Mushroom Family: Mushrooms, puffballs, Truffles
Mustard/Cabbage Family/Brassicas: Horseradish, mustard, rutabaga, turnip, cabbage, broccoli family, brussel sprouts, cauliflower, Chinese cabbages and bok choy varieties, collard greens, kale, canola oil, rapeseed, cress. If it's leafy (or broccoli like) and not shaped like a ducks foot, it's probably in this family.

Nutmeg Family: Nutmeg, mace
Olive Family: All olives
Orchid Family: Vanilla
Palm Family: Coconut, date, hearts of palm
Papaya Family: Papaya
Parsley Family: Anise, caraway, carrot, celery, celery seed, chervil, coriander, cumin, dill, fennel, parsley, parsnip, lovage, cilantro, celery root/celeriac
PassionFlower Family: Passion Fruit
Pea Family: Alfalfa, clover, beans (aduki, fava, green, kidney, lima, mung, navy, pinto, snap, string, soy, garbanzo, locust, carob, lentil, split pea), peanuts, peas (black-eyed, chick peas, green peas) licorice, tamarind.
Pepper Family: peppercorns, white pepper, black pepper
Pheasant Family: Chicken and chicken eggs, pheasant, quail
Pineapple Family: Pineapple family
Plum Family/Genus Prunus: Stone fruit -Almond, apricot, cherry, chokeberry, nectarine, peach, plum, prune
Poppy Family: Poppy seed
Potato Family (Nightshade): Eggplant/aubergine, potato, tobacco, tomato, peppers: cayenne, chili, tobasco, paprika, pimiento, tomatillo, jalapeno, bell peppers of all colors
Prawn Family: Prawn, shrimp
Protea Family: Macadamia nut
Rose Family: Blackberry, boysenberry, raspberry, strawberry
Citrus Family: Citron, grapefruit, lemon, lime, mandarin, oranges, tangerine, tangelo, ugly fruit, key lime, all kinds of hybrids...
Yeast Family: Baker's yeast, brewer's yeast
Sapucaya Family: Brazil Nut, paradise nut
Sesame Family: Sesame seeds, sesame oil
Spurge Family: Castor oil, tapioca (aka yucca, cassava & others names), arrowroot
Stercula Family: Chocolate, cocoa, cola nut
Tea family: Camellia sinensis teas aka Black tea, green tea, white tea
Walnut Family: Black walnut, English Walnut, white walnut
Yams: Yams, Chinese potato, cush-cush, water yams, yellow yams, black yams, elephant's foot. (Sweet potatoes are often mistakenly called yam, but it is very unlikely you'll find a true yam in an American or probably European market. Those things in your supermarket or what you had for Thanksgiving dinner are most likely sweet potatoes, regardless of what they call them.)

Edited by alternativista, 22 January 2012 - 04:36 PM.


#13 fiveAM

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Posted 28 October 2008 - 11:55 AM

i just ordered a take at home ELISA test, took it, mailed it out and got my results. the funny thing is that i took it with my boyfriend, mainly to be supportive because of he gets chronic headaches. (food sensitivities are a common cause of chronic headaches). we got the packet in the mail and i looked at his results-a 2-page list of 96 foods, with his corresponding IgG score adjacent. I flipped through them quickly, with his hovering over my shoulder, quickly noticing that his only reactive foods (low reactions, at that) were bananas and peas.
"oh well," i said. "it was worth a try. when we get health insurance we will definitely figure this out. you should keep a food journal or something... maybe a preservative is bothering you, or something thats not on the list."
he smiled, unperturbed (unlike me he is almost always an unshakable fortress of calm), and said, "what about you? where are your results?"
I flipped through the packet, looking for a similar looking list. "Its not in here," I said.
He reached over my shoulder and pulled out a huge, 15 page packet. "whats this?"
"oh, thats just some informational packet about food allergies."
He pointed a finger at the cover page. My mouth gaped open. my name was in the title. "how come mine is so much bigger then yours?!" i flipped through the pages, and was shocked when I looked at the results. I have a high reaction to ALL dairy products, ALL wheat and related plants (such as barley), eggs (whites and yolks), peanuts, kidney beans, lima beans, and a moderately high reaction to soy beans and peas- plus a moderate or low reaction to about a dozen more foods. "NO WAY! These are all my favorite foods!"
Laughing, he said, "not anymore!"
Skeptically- but reluctant to through away results (albeit unexpected ones) from a test that cost over 200 dollars to take, i decided to eliminate all of those foods from my diet. its only the 3rd day but I actually feel much better! I didn't realize how tired and uncomfortable I was all the time! when i was younger I used to throw up in the middle of the night CONSTANTLY- and I guess I just became accustomed to feeling nauseous and crampy all the time. these feelings are starting to subside- very slowly. but what i have also started noticing is that i havent had any new breakouts. my usually red skin (under control and much improved after 3 rounds of accutane) is brighter, more evenly toned. I didn't expect this to effect my skin.
Anyway, they say that it takes up to a month (rarely sometimes even 3) for your immune system to settle down, so I won't know truly what kind of effect this will have on skin- and on my health in general- for a while. but I just had to post this because there is NO WAY i would have known what foods to avoid without getting tested. NEVER. so please. if you think your acne is food related, don't torture yourself trying to avoid certain foods. if you don't have health insurance save up and get the test. type in "take home allergy test" into google. the one I took was from dr. forrest's web page. The same diet doesn't work for everyone- it just doesn't. anyway, good luck! and wish me luck, i'll keep everyone posted.
ps- i might post a similar post in the main forum when i have more time- sorry for repeats.

#14 alternativista

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 11:19 AM

I've often heard it said that allergy tests are prone to false positives. I wonder if that applies to the IgG tests as well.

Well, I decided to try avoiding the things on the allergy test I had a few years ago even though it's about IgE responses for which I never get any symptoms. Maybe you can get IgG reactions to the same items a test measures IgE responses. Anyone know? Also, maybe the reason my test only showed mild reactions, no severe reactions is because the real reaction was in IgG anti-bodies which weren't measured.

So on my test, reactions were rated on a scale of 1-5, 5 being the most reaction. I got a few 2s and quite a few 1s. Oranges, which definitely cause severe cystic acne, were a 1. 2s were various cow dairy products, egg whites, and baking powder.

I'd already tried avoiding dairy several times without results. although I'm mostly only having a small amount of yogurt these days. I don't drink milk and have had cheese very infrequently.

Anyway, I've avoided eggs for over two weeks and definitely had far fewer headaches. I had a lot, sometimes somewhat severe, in the weeks prior. My headaches are usually not severe, almost never debilitating. Not like migraines. The headaches actually occur with the changes in the weather which happens all the time here. But I think there have been just as many fronts coming in the past two weeks as there were before, so just as many weather changes.

However, I've also been mostly eating hypo-allergenic foods, which might also be having an impact, although I'm not being very methodical about it. Just mostly eating hypo-allergenic.

#15 alternativista

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 11:24 AM

I just noticed something on that website in the link posted by the OP. It said that IgE and IgG are the usual antibodies involved in an allergic reaction. So that means there are others? Are they ever measured?

#16 alternativista

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 10:32 AM

Just linking a couple of related and interesting threads together:

http://www.acne.org/...s...mplex&st=20

About a relationship between androgens and histamines.

#17 darklight

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 09:02 PM

So to stop these allergy we have to avoid them? Why do we have these symptoms now but not doing pre-puberty period? And can we build up our body (liver, alkaline blood, etc) so that we would not have these allergy or at least minimize their effects?

#18 alternativista

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 11:32 AM

QUOTE (darklight @ Jan 26 2009, 09:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So to stop these allergy we have to avoid them? Why do we have these symptoms now but not doing pre-puberty period? And can we build up our body (liver, alkaline blood, etc) so that we would not have these allergy or at least minimize their effects?


Allergies and intolerances can start at any time, such as in times of stress. And yes, you might minimize reactions depending on the severity. It can be a lengthy chain of events or set of conditions that you can break by eliminating one factor.

Did you check out the linked thread on Androgens and histamines.

#19 alternativista

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 02:59 PM

Has anyone tried this method:

QUOTE
Use the pulse test to check for food allergies

Pulse test is a good way to check for food allergies. It's fast, free, simple and you can do it at home. Of course it's not as accurate as blood tests, but it's free and you can do it at home.

Here's how to do the pulse test:

* Identify the food you want to test. It's better to test individual foods or even nutrients rather than whole meals. The more specific you test the better the results. For example test for wheat rather than bread, and for bread rather than a sandwich.
* Check your base pulse rate. You can do this while sitting down or laying down on bed. It's important you do measurements at the same position. To check your pulse put on finger either on your wrist or on your neck where the arteries are. I find it easier to feel my pulse on the carotid artery on the neck. Using a wrist or stopwatch count the number of beats for 60 seconds. The count you get is your resting pulse (beats per minute). It's important to do this at rest and at least two hours after any exercise. High levels of stress can also increase your pulse rate so be as relaxed as possible.
* Then eat the food you want to test.
* Check your pulse rate again after 15, 30 and 60 minutes. If your pulse rate is more 10 or more beats higher than your base pulse rate you are allergic to that food. Smaller elevations may point to less severe allergies.

Pulse test gives a reasonably good indication of food allergies and you should include it into your acne fighting toolkit.
http://www.natural-a...rgies-acne.html


Does anyone know anything about a reaction increasing your pulse? What kinds of reactions?

Also, list of common allergen foods from test for antibodies (i.e. allergies) typically found in people with IBS:
http://www.ibstreatm...nter.com/b2.htm

Edited by alternativista, 08 March 2010 - 07:08 PM.


#20 Zanpakutou

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 08:48 PM

I've not done the actual test, but I have in the past felt my heart pumping faster along with some anxiety after eating a bowl of cereal with milk. I couldn't understand why I was feeling anxious while only sitting at my computer reading boring articles, which also made it difficult to fall asleep.




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