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#1 SweetJade1980

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 08:27 PM


QUOTE
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2004;13(Suppl):S67. Related Articles, Links


The effect of short-term altered macronutrient status on acne vulgaris and biochemical markers of insulin sensitivity.

Smith R, Mann N, Makelainen H, Braue A, Varigos G.

Food Science Department, RMIT University, VIC 3000.

Background - It has been suggested that a low-glycemic index diet may alleviate acne and this hypothesis is currently being investigated in a long-term dietary intervention study. A short-term, live-in study was designed to further investigate this link and to provide information on the short-term effects of altered macronutrient levels.

Objective - To determine the short-term effects of a low-glycemic load diet on markers of insulin sensitivity and how this relates to the clinical progression of acne vulgaris.

Design - Eleven male acne sufferers, aged 15-20, were allocated to either a high protein (HP,n=6, 40-45% energy from carbohydrate, 25% energy from protein) or high carbohydrate group (HC, n=5, 55-60% energy from carbohydrate, 10% energy from protein). Fat intake was maintained at 30-35% energy for each group. All meals were provided on an ad libitum basis for 7 days. Food consumed was measured at baseline and during the live-in study for an overall assessment of an individual's glycemic load. At baseline and day 7, the subject's acne was assessed by a dermatologist and blood was sampled for hormonal markers of acne and HOMA-IR.

Conclusion - The sample size and/or study length was insufficient to observe any significant changes in inflammatory counts or HOMA-IR in either the HP or HC groups. Although some results appear promising, further research is needed to confirm the diet-acne connection.


PMID: 15294556 [PubMed - in process]



QUOTE
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2005;14 Suppl:S43. Related Articles, Links


The effect of a low glycemic load, high protein diet on hormonal markers of acne.

Smith R, Mann N, Braue A, Varigos G.

School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC.

Background - Acne vulgaris is a common endocrine condition affecting adolescents in Western civilizations. Acne typically manifests during puberty when there is a transient decrease in insulin sensitivity. It has been suggested that high glycemic nutrition during puberty induces hyperinsulinemia which increases the bioavailability of androgens and certain growth factors. These changes may induce follicular epithelial growth and increased sebum production - two factors responsible for acne proliferation.

Objective - To determine the effect of a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low glycemic index (GI) foods, on hormonal makers of acne vulgaris.

Design - Male acne sufferers [n=43, age=18.3+/-0.4 (mean +/- SEM)] were randomly assigned to either the dietary intervention (n=23) or control groups (n=20). The intervention diet consisted of 25% energy from protein and 45% energy from low glycemic index carbohydrates. The control group received no information about diet nor were they given dietary instruction. Venous blood was collected at baseline and 12-weeks for an assessment of testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index (FAI), dehydroepiandrosterone - sulfate (DHEA-S), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding proteins -I and -3.

Outcomes - Dietary intervention resulted in a significant reduction in FAI (-9.1 +/- 4.5, P<0.05) and DHEA-S (-0.72 +/- 0.33 umol/L, P<0.05) and an increase in IGFBP-1 (5.3 +/- 1.6 ng/mL, P<0.01). No significant changes were observed in levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3, testosterone or SHBG following dietary intervention. The control group showed no change in any of the blood parameters measured.

Conclusion - These data suggest that a low glycemic load diet may reduce androgenic activity (as indicated by a reduction in FAI and DHEA-S) and may oppose the growth promoting effects of IGF-I by increasing levels of its binding protein, IGFBP-I. This implies that a low glycemic load diet may reduce hormonal influences involved in acne pathogenesis. http://www.ncbi.nlm....l=pubmed_docsum


PMID: 16326495 [PubMed - in process]


QUOTE
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2005;14 Suppl:S97. Related Articles, Links


Low glycemic load, high protein diet lessens facial acne severity.

Smith R, Mann N, Braue A, Varigos G.

School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC.

Background - Acne vulgaris is a multi-factorial skin disorder which affects the 85-100% of the adolescent population in Western civilizations. Despite its high prevalence in the West, acne prevalence is extremely low or rare in non-westernized societies. It has been proposed that refined, high glycemic foods common in Western societies may accentuate underlying causal factors responsible for its proliferation.

Objective - To determine whether a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low GI foods, can alleviate the severity of acne symptoms in young males Design - Male acne sufferers [n=43, age=18.3 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SEM)] were randomly assigned to either the dietary intervention (n=23) or control groups (n=20). The intervention diet consisted of 25% energy from protein and 45% energy from low glycemic index carbohydrates. The control group received no information about diet nor were they given dietary instruction. The efficacy of dietary treatment versus control was clinically assessed by a dermatologist using a modified Cunliffe-Leeds acne scale. The dermatologist assessed facial acne by means of lesion counts and was blinded to the subject's group.

Outcomes - Dietary intervention resulted in a reduction in total lesion counts (-23.1 +/- 4.0 lesions, P <0.001) and inflammatory counts (-16.2 +/- 3.0 lesions, P <0.001). The control group also showed a reduction in total lesion counts (-12.0 +/- 3.5 lesions, P <0.01) and inflammatory counts (-7.4 +/- 2.5 lesions, P <0.05). However, between group analyses showed that the reduction was significantly greater in the intervention group for total counts (P <0.05) and inflammatory counts (P <0.05).

Conclusion - These data indicate that a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low GI foods, significantly decreased the mean number of facial acne lesions, therefore alleviating the severity of acne symptoms. However, the multi-factorial nature of this condition is reflected in the fact that the control group also showed a decrease over time, thereby suggesting that other factors are at play. http://www.ncbi.nlm....l=pubmed_docsum


PMID: 16326597 [PubMed - in process]

#2 SweetJade1980

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 08:33 PM

While some may frown on Dr. Mann due to his affliations....what I love the most....is that he uses males when he studies acne & diet because there is this stigma that because males are naturally supposed to have high androgen levels that there couldn't possibly have an imbalance (i.e. too much) and thus most doctors will not put a male on an anti-androgen, etc., let alone even test a male to see what kind of hormonal imbalance may be going on (adrenal, thyroid, androgen, etc)!

(there are plenty of studies involving females and diet more indirectly...via Insulin Resistance & PCOS studies)

*While the studies are still severely lacking (i.e. region, ethnic, individualistic difference in triggers) when it comes to this topic, the majority of these diet-acne breakthrough studies are NOT done in the United States... eusa_think.gif



QUOTE
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008 May 21.

A pilot study to determine the short-term effects of a low glycemic load diet on hormonal
markers of acne: A nonrandomized, parallel, controlled feeding trial.



Smith R, Mann N, Mäkeläinen H, Roper J, Braue A, Varigos G.
School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. Fax: +613-9258-5090.

Observational evidence suggests that dietary glycemic load may be one environmental factor contributing to the variation in acne prevalence worldwide. To investigate the effect of a low glycemic load (LGL) diet on endocrine aspects of acne vulgaris, 12 male acne sufferers (17.0 +/- 0.4 years) completed a parallel, controlled feeding trial involving a 7-day admission to a housing facility. Subjects consumed either an LGL diet (n = 7; 25% energy from protein and 45% from carbohydrates) or a high glycemic load (HGL) diet (n = 5; 15% energy from protein, 55% energy from carbohydrate). Study outcomes included changes in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index (FAI), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and its binding proteins (IGFBP-I and IGFBP-3). Changes in HOMA-IR were significantly different between groups at day 7 (-0.57 for LGL vs. 0.14 for HGL, p = 0.03). SHBG levels decreased significantly from baseline in the HGL group (p = 0.03), while IGFBP-I and IGFBP-3 significantly increased (p = 0.03 and 0.03, respectively) in the LGL group. These results suggest that increases in dietary glycemic load may augment the biological activity of sex hormones and IGF-I, suggesting that these diets may aggravate potential factors involved in acne development. http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum



QUOTE
J Dermatol Sci. 2008 Apr;50(1):41-52.

The effect of a low glycemic load diet on acne vulgaris and the fatty acid composition of skin surface triglycerides.

Smith RN, Braue A, Varigos GA, Mann NJ.
School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Victoria 3001, Australia. robyn.smith@rmit.edu.au <robyn.smith@rmit.edu.au>

BACKGROUND: Dietary factors have long been implicated in acne pathogenesis. It has recently been hypothesized that low glycemic load diets may influence sebum production based on the beneficial endocrine effects of these diets.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of a low glycemic load diet on acne and the fatty acid composition of skin surface triglycerides.

METHODS: Thirty-one male acne patients (aged 15-25 years) completed sebum sampling tests as part of a larger 12-week, parallel design dietary intervention trial. The experimental treatment was a low glycemic load diet, comprised of 25% energy from protein and 45% from low glycemic index carbohydrates. In contrast, the control situation emphasized carbohydrate-dense foods without reference to the glycemic index. Acne lesion counts were assessed during monthly visits. At baseline and 12-weeks, the follicular sebum outflow and composition of skin surface triglycerides were assessed using lipid absorbent tapes.

RESULTS: At 12 weeks, subjects on the experimental diet demonstrated increases in the ratio of saturated to monounsaturated fatty acids of skin surface triglycerides when compared to controls [5.3+/-2.0% (mean+/-S.E.M.) vs. -2.7+/-1.7%, P=0.007]. The increase in the saturated/monounsaturated ratio correlated with acne lesion counts(r=-0.39, P=0.03). Increased follicular sebum outflow was also associated with an increase in the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids in sebum (r=0.49, P=0.006).

CONCLUSION: This suggests a possible role of desaturase enzymes in sebaceous lipogenesis and the clinical manifestation of acne. However, further work is needed to clarify the underlying role of diet in sebum gland physiology.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum




QUOTE
Clin Dermatol. 2008 Jan-Feb;26(1):93-6.

Diet and acne.

Danby FW. Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire, Manchester, NH 03104, USA. fwdljm@tds.net <fwdljm@tds.net>

Acne is caused by the action of dihydrotestosterone, derived from endogenous and exogenous precursors, likely acting synergistically with insulin-like growth factor-1. These sources and interactions are discussed. Both a mechanism of action and recommended dietary changes that limit ingestion and production of these hormones are proposed. http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum


This is one method of development...BUT there are men that take steriods or have high testosterone levels and they don't break out....we still need the inflammatory response.. This much dreaded inflammation, is something that occurs in the development of being Insulin Resistant, among other hormonal disorders that have acne as a symptom! (see other thread)


QUOTE
Am Acad Dermatol. 2008 May;58(5):787-93. Epub 2008 Jan 14. Links


Milk consumption and acne in teenaged boys.

Adebamowo CA, Spiegelman D, Berkey CS, Danby FW, Rockett HH, Colditz GA, Willett WC, Holmes MD.
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine the association between dietary dairy intake and teenaged acne among boys.

METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study. We studied 4273 boys, members of a prospective cohort study of youths and of lifestyle factors, who reported dietary intake on up to 3 food frequency questionnaires from 1996 to 1998 and teenaged acne in 1999. We computed multivariate prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for acne.

RESULTS: After adjusting for age at baseline, height, and energy intake, the multivariate prevalence ratios (95% confidence interval; P value for test of trend) for acne comparing highest (>2 servings/d) with lowest (<1/wk) intake categories in 1996 were 1.16 (1.01, 1.34; 0.77) for total milk, 1.10 (0.94, 1.28; 0.83) for whole/2% milk, 1.17 (0.99, 1.39; 0.08) for low-fat (1%) milk, and 1.19 (1.01, 1.40; 0.02) for skim milk.

LIMITATIONS: Not all members of the cohort responded to the questionnaire. Acne assessment was by self-report and boys whose symptoms might have been part of an underlying disorder were not excluded. We did not adjust for steroid use and other lifestyle factors that may affect occurrence of acne.

CONCLUSION: We found a positive association between intake of skim milk and acne. This finding suggests that skim milk contains hormonal constituents, or factors that influence endogenous hormones, in sufficient quantities to have biological effects in consumers. http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum


There was a study originally published in.... 2004 involving females and they came to the same conclusion!



QUOTE
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;86(1):107-15. Links

A low-glycemic-load diet improves symptoms in acne vulgaris patients: a randomized controlled trial.

Smith RN, Mann NJ, Braue A, Mäkeläinen H, Varigos GA.
School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. robyn.smith@rmit.edu.au

BACKGROUND: Although the pathogenesis of acne is currently unknown, recent epidemiologic studies of non-Westernized populations suggest that dietary factors, including the glycemic load, may be involved.

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine whether a low-glycemic-load diet improves acne lesion counts in young males.

DESIGN: Forty-three male acne patients aged 15-25 y were recruited for a 12-wk, parallel design, dietary intervention incorporating investigator-blinded dermatology assessments. The experimental treatment was a low-glycemic-load diet composed of 25% energy from protein and 45% from low-glycemic-index carbohydrates. In contrast, the control situation emphasized carbohydrate-dense foods without reference to the glycemic index. Acne lesion counts and severity were assessed during monthly visits, and insulin sensitivity (using the homeostasis model assessment) was measured at baseline and 12 wk.

RESULTS: At 12 wk, mean (+/-SEM) total lesion counts had decreased more (P=0.03) in the low-glycemic-load group (-23.5 +/- 3.9) than in the control group (-12.0 +/- 3.5). The experimental diet also resulted in a greater reduction in weight (-2.9 +/- 0.8 compared with 0.5 +/- 0.3 kg; P<0.001) and body mass index (in kg/m(2); -0.92 +/- 0.25 compared with 0.01 +/- 0.11; P=0.001) and a greater improvement in insulin sensitivity (-0.22 +/- 0.12 compared with 0.47 +/- 0.31; P=0.026) than did the control diet.

CONCLUSION: The improvement in acne and insulin sensitivity after a low-glycemic-load diet suggests that nutrition-related lifestyle factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of acne. However, further studies are needed to isolate the independent effects of weight loss and dietary intervention and to further elucidate the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum




QUOTE
: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007 Aug;57(2):247-56. Epub 2007 Apr 19. Links


The effect of a high-protein, low glycemic-load diet versus a conventional, high glycemic-load diet on biochemical parameters associated with acne vulgaris: a randomized, investigator-masked, controlled trial.

Smith RN, Mann NJ, Braue A, Mäkeläinen H, Varigos GA.
School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

BACKGROUND: No previous study has sought to examine the influence of dietary composition on acne vulgaris. OBJECTIVE: We sought to compare the effect of an experimental low glycemic-load diet with a conventional high glycemic-load diet on clinical and endocrine aspects of acne vulgaris. METHODS: A total of 43 male patients with acne completed a 12-week, parallel, dietary intervention study with investigator-masked dermatology assessments. Primary outcomes measures were changes in lesion counts, sex hormone binding globulin, free androgen index, insulin-like growth factor-I, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. RESULTS: At 12 weeks, total lesion counts had decreased more in the experimental group (-21.9 [95% confidence interval, -26.8 to -19.0]) compared with the control group (-13.8 [-19.1 to -8.5], P = .01). The experimental diet also reduced weight (P = .001), reduced the free androgen index (P = .04), and increased insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (P = .001) when compared with a high glycemic-load diet. LIMITATIONS: We could not preclude the role of weight loss in the overall treatment effect. CONCLUSION: This suggests nutrition-related lifestyle factors play a role in acne pathogenesis. However, these preliminary findings should be confirmed by similar studies. http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum




QUOTE
Dermatol Online J. 2006 May 30;12(4):1

Milk consumption and acne in adolescent girls.

Adebamowo CA, Spiegelman D, Berkey CS, Danby FW, Rockett HH, Colditz GA, Willett WC, Holmes MD.
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.

There has been a remarkable paucity of evidence for an association between diet and acne. Our previous studies suggest that there is an association between milk intake and teenage acne. This is a prospective cohort study to evaluate that relationship. We studied 6,094 girls, aged 9-15 years in 1996, who reported dietary intake on up to three food frequency questionnaires from 1996 to 1998. Presence and severity of acne was assessed by questionnaire in 1999. We computed multivariate prevalence ratios (PR) and 95 percent confidence intervals for acne. After accounting for age at baseline, height and energy intake, the multivariate PRs (95 % CI; p-value for test of trend) for acne comparing highest (2 or more servings per day) to lowest (<1 per week) intake categories in 1996, were 1.20 (1.09, 1.31; <0.001) for total milk, 1.19 (1.06, 1.32; <0.001) for whole milk, 1.17 (1.04, 1.31; 0.002) for low fat milk and 1.19 (1.08, 1.31; <0.001) for skim milk. This result did not change appreciably when we excluded girls who reported use of contraceptives and when we restricted our analysis to those younger than 11 years of age at baseline. We found a positive association between intake of milk and acne. This finding supports earlier studies and suggests that the metabolic effects of milk are sufficient to elicit biological responses in consumers. http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum


Paucity - Lack of, scarcity...


QUOTE
Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1584-90. Links

Acne vulgaris: a disease of Western civilization.

Cordain L, Lindeberg S, Hurtado M, Hill K, Eaton SB, Brand-Miller J.
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. cordain@cahs.colostate.edu

BACKGROUND: In westernized societies, acne vulgaris is a nearly universal skin disease afflicting 79% to 95% of the adolescent population. In men and women older than 25 years, 40% to 54% have some degree of facial acne, and clinical facial acne persists into middle age in 12% of women and 3% of men. Epidemiological evidence suggests that acne incidence rates are considerably lower in nonwesternized societies. Herein we report the prevalence of acne in 2 nonwesternized populations: the Kitavan Islanders of Papua New Guinea and the Aché hunter-gatherers of Paraguay. Additionally, we analyze how elements in nonwesternized environments may influence the development of acne.

OBSERVATIONS: Of 1200 Kitavan subjects examined (including 300 aged 15-25 years), no case of acne (grade 1 with multiple comedones or grades 2-4) was observed. Of 115 Aché subjects examined (including 15 aged 15-25 years) over 843 days, no case of active acne (grades 1-4) was observed.

CONCLUSIONS: The astonishing difference in acne incidence rates between nonwesternized and fully modernized societies cannot be solely attributed to genetic differences among populations but likely results from differing environmental factors. Identification of these factors may be useful in the treatment of acne in Western populations.
http://archderm.ama-...ull/138/12/1584 (Full Text)



#3 SweetJade1980

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 08:41 PM

I've already read some of the responses regarding Dr. Mann and his affliations but what about the other studies? There's the evidence provided through these studies which members rebuff and of course there's plenty of our own...anecdotal or testimonial evidence over in the Nutrition & Holistic Forum. For example, here's an excerpt from a post by Minnymouse in March 2005:

QUOTE
Here's some excerpts from his emails when I questioned what the study was about:

QUOTE
--We are finding different people have different levels of sensitivity
but your sons diet of moderate level of carb foods and the type (most
sound low GI) should be very good. Look for low GI labelled foods and
get a book that lists GI of foods such as Jennie Brand-Miller's various
GI books, but there are many others. The brown rice is probably the
only thing you mention that could be still high GI (there are even
different types of brown rice) Our subjects ate limited amounts of
whole grain products and limited amounts of rice (low GI basmati) but no
high GI carb foods. I think whole grain low GI foods, should be OK
along with meats and fish (I doubt if the fat at this stage of life is
a worry for your son for acne, weight gain or heart disease, may be
later in life), in fact he may need extra fat and protein to provide him
more energy to make up for the decreased carbs. Certainly avoid sugary
sweet items like sweetened fruit juice and sodas and any product made
from flour or potatoes. Lots of vegetables, fruits and meat and fish
and nuts and beans, and soy. If he seems also sensitive to dairy as
some teenagers are then stay off dairy until acne phase is over.


--We are nearing completion of our study and will publish this year.
Slow process because we not only need to show an improvement in visual
acne condition but blood chemistry changes that can be used to develop
an hypothesis as to what aspects of metabolism are being altered by diet
to effect an acne change
. This blood analytical work is happening now
and we are seeing complex metabolic changes that relate to various skin
cell abnormalities and acne. The dermatology side did show improvement
on our diet but I need to qualify this a little. Young boys do not
stick well on diets when they are free living and exposed to abundance
of processed foods
. The boys on low glycaemic load diets did gradually
improve (4-8 weeks) if they kept to the diet which included:

Low starch and sugar intake, ie eliminate all high GI foods, which
eliminated most bread, potatoes, most rice, baked goods made from any
flour ie any refined carb product, some fruits also can have high carb
eg bananas so go easy on these, sweetened products with much added sugar,
glucose or corn syrup are very bad even fruit juices with added carb
sweeteners should be avoided.


Our diets were rich in meat, fish, vegetables, salads, most fruits,
nuts and very low in grain and sweetened foods.

The unfortunate part is that it takes several weeks to clear up the acne but only a day or two to reactivate if a high GI carb food is consumed, this we cannot
alter, its just the way the metabolic process works, so the person must
be careful.


Finally we are not all genetically the same and your sons acne may not
respond to the same extent as others and there seem to be some rare
cases where the person has an intolerance to a particular food or food
group that stimulates acne for them individually
, dairy is an example
for some people, so if the above does not work try food eliminations
over several weeks and try and identify any food group that he may be
reacting to.

**************


Minny talking:

I sent him an email telling him how much improvement I saw in my son's cystic acne from being on this for 1 month. He has one breakout on his cheek right now verses a whole face full prior to this diet. He is on NO medication.

Here's Dr. Mann's last email- he is reffering to my son's success.

QUOTE
--Very happy to hear this, fantastic for us researchers when we hear the
beneficial results of what we are working on, particularly when it does
not involve drugs.

Once we publish our study we will be talking at conferences in the USA
about it. I also hope to get print and TV media coverage so we can get
this knowledge out to millions of other young people and their families.
If you ever get an opportunity to present this information to media
particularly your US TV shows go for it and let me know. This is really
the best way to to communicate with the widest possible audience and as
you have seen the benefit can be outstanding.

My best wishes for your sons full recovery and his future.
http://www.acne.org/...p...=46037&st=0



Here's her initial post of the topic:

Mom of 17 year old researched and stopped acne: Stop the bread, pasta, sugars, chips
http://www.acne.org/...p...=43542&st=0

#4 SweetJade1980

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 08:48 PM

The sections that I colored within the prior correspondances with Dr. Mann once again go back to [ban ]inflammatory reaction being THE initiator in the development of acne [/b] with us as individuals having various triggers for this event.


QUOTE
Hautarzt. 2008 May 18.
[Acne : Current pathophysiologic considerations.][Article in German]


Degitz K, Ochsendorf F.
Dermatologische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Pasinger Bahnhofsplatz1, 81241, MĂĽnchen, Deutschland, Klaus.Degitz@lrz.uni-muenchen.de.

Seborrhea, follicular hyperkeratosis, propionibacteria, and inflammatory reactions are the most important factors leading to acne. The combination of increased sebum producation and follicular hyperkeratosis facilitates an increased growth of Propionibacterium acnes. Its metabolic products lead to follicular inflammation and, in extreme cases, even to perifollicular abscesses. Sebum production is influenced by androgens, so that abnormalities in androgen levels can produce seborrhea and acne. Follicular hyperkeratosis may be triggered by a relative deficiency in linoleic acid, peroxides from sebum components, and especially by inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1. Bacterial metabolic products such as lipases, proteases, or chemotactic factors lead to the perifollicular inflammation. This inflammation is not only a response to other pathogenetic factors, but also a cause of acne. An initial mild perifollicular infammation can induce comedogenesis via a variety of mediators. The influence of dietary factors on the initiation and course of acne has recently received increased recognition. A connection has been postulated between acne and a high nutrients with glycemic index, as well as with milk products. http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum




Immune Response (and acne)http://www.acne.org/...se-t196132.html (more in a later thread)

#5 timmoore

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 03:01 PM

do you need to keep your total gylcemic load under 80?

are almonds safe , mostly mono fat and low in omega 6?

#6 SweetJade1980

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Posted 31 May 2008 - 07:44 PM

QUOTE (timmoore @ May 31 2008, 03:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
do you need to keep your total gylcemic load under 80?

are almonds safe , mostly mono fat and low in omega 6?



It varies per individual.


That being said....for me almonds are not safe. I consume 200g - 300g of carbohydrates a day, which is half of what I used to! I do not carbohydrate count because the GI or GL plays no role in my acne....unless we are talking about ADDED Sugars!

> 2g of Table Sugar/sucrose or Glucose/Dextrose....pustules

ANY Fructose Based Sweetener (Agave Nectar, Fructose/Levulose, HFCS, Honey, 100% Fruit Juice....and possible others)... Cystic/Nodular Acne.

The only thing I personally have observed regarding fats is to avoid Trans Fats...it gives me larger pores and increases unwanted hair a bit too. Since that's the case...the price to pay isn't as bad as acne so...sometimes when I'm feeling particularly "bad", LOL, I will order fries from companies that I'm not certain about what oil they are using.

I can eat watermelon all day long....I can eat white rice all day long. Ultimately for ME ...it's more about the foods that I'm intolerant to that would induce a chronic inflammatory response that would lead to my body being Insulin Resistant, etc.

I wish I could say more, as there may be clues to guide an individual in selecting the right diet, but it's not so cut and dry. The studies support the argument for the diet-acne connection, but not everyone will find they are intolerant to the same foods , which is what Dr. Mann, among other scientists, and Nutrigenomicists do recognize. I will write more about this later....must gather allllll my thoughts first eusa_angel.gif

All the best!

#7 timmoore

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 12:13 PM

ok just found out dr. mann says keep gycemic load under 70.
avoid high gylcemic cards and you can eat 2-3 servings of whoile graisn a dfay

also he says almonds are safe.

he just did another study showing that high glycemic changes sebum compostion but didnt find it yet.

#8 joris

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Posted 25 February 2010 - 03:14 PM

RESULTS: After adjusting for age at baseline, height, and energy intake, the multivariate prevalence ratios (95% confidence interval; P value for test of trend) for acne comparing highest (>2 servings/d) with lowest (<1/wk) intake categories in 1996 were 1.16 (1.01, 1.34; 0.77) for total milk, 1.10 (0.94, 1.28; 0.83) for whole/2% milk, 1.17 (0.99, 1.39; 0.08) for low-fat (1%) milk, and 1.19 (1.01, 1.40; 0.02) for skim milk.

After accounting for age at baseline, height and energy intake, the multivariate PRs (95 % CI; p-value for test of trend) for acne comparing highest (2 or more servings per day) to lowest (<1 per week) intake categories in 1996, were 1.20 (1.09, 1.31; <0.001) for total milk, 1.19 (1.06, 1.32; <0.001) for whole milk, 1.17 (1.04, 1.31; 0.002) for low fat milk and 1.19 (1.08, 1.31; <0.001) for skim milk

What do these mean???? I dont get the numbers. Can anybody please explain to me...

Also for the Gl studies: isnt it that theres not really that much correlation between the results. Some showed increase , most decrease but not significant, and only few a significant decrease right?

Edited by joris, 25 February 2010 - 03:17 PM.