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Chia Seed

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#21 creamsoda

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 02:42 PM

I use chia seeds in my morning shake and I also use Salba which is the same thing, but they tend to hike the price on it. One can also buy salba flour which makes really tasty muffins!!!

#22 rakbs

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 08:16 PM

QUOTE (alternativista @ Jul 26 2008, 12:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (AutonomousOne1980 @ Jul 26 2008, 12:49 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
seeds are specifically designed by nature NOT to be digested, so that they will be excreted in your feces and spread throughout the earth to grow.


Except when soaked in water. Moisture signals that conditions are right for sprouting and the protective coatings break down.


QUOTE
Grains require careful preparation because they contain a number of antinutrients that can cause serious health problems. Phytic acid, for example, is an organic acid in which phosphorus is bound. It is mostly found in the bran or outer hull of seeds. Untreated phytic acid can combine with calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and especially zinc in the intestinal tract and block their absorption. This is why a diet high in improperly prepared whole grains may lead to serious mineral deficiencies and bone loss. The modern misguided practice of consuming large amounts of unprocessed bran often improves colon transit time at first but may lead to irritable bowel syndrome and, in the long term, many other adverse effects.

Other antinutrients in whole grains include enzyme inhibitors which can inhibit digestion and put stress on the pancreas; irritating tannins; complex sugars which the body cannot break down; and gluten and related hard-to-digest proteins which may cause allergies, digestive disorders and even mental illness.

Most of these antinutrients are part of the seed's system of preservation—they prevent sprouting until the conditions are right.
Plants need moisture, warmth, time and slight acidity in order to sprout. Proper preparation of grains is a kind and gentle process that imitates the process that occurs in nature. It involves soaking for a period in warm, acidulated water in the preparation of porridge, or long, slow sour dough fermentation in the making of bread. Such processes neutralize phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors. Vitamin content increases, particularly B vitamins. Tannins, complex sugars, gluten and other difficult-to-digest substances are partially broken down into simpler components that are more readily available for absorption.


The full article is at http://www.westonapr...es/be_kind.html
Clear for 8+ months now through striving for optimal fitness levels, stress levels, sleep, nutrient density in my body, and an overall holistic lifestyle approach.

Diet (I stick to this as much as I can): eggs; meat; poultry; wild-caught seafood; vegetables; fat sources from coconut oil, olive oil, and butter; fruit as I crave it; tea; and purified water. I buy organic and/or pastured foods as I reasonably can, but I think that it's the type of foods you eat, and not the quality of food (within reason, of course) that most determines how healthy you will be.

I highly recommend green smoothies as nutrition powerhouses. They are good on so many levels.

Now experimenting with a higher proportion of legumes, nuts, and seeds in my diet.

I eat absolutely no gluten. I limit intake of all grains, but up to two servings of non-glutenous grain a day is fine. I avoid all added sugar--high fructose corn syrup, sugar, honey, etc. I stay away from soybean oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, and other oils not named olive or coconut. I base my diet off of whole, unprocessed foods, and I prepare them in healthful, delicious ways.

Daily exercise. Sunlight whenever possible.

Supplements: Currently? None. Supplements that have helped in the past (and I can personally recommend) are fish oil, zinc, apple cider vinegar, Vitamin D.

#23 tobias

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 05:02 AM

QUOTE (rakbs @ Jul 26 2008, 09:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (alternativista @ Jul 26 2008, 12:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (AutonomousOne1980 @ Jul 26 2008, 12:49 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
seeds are specifically designed by nature NOT to be digested, so that they will be excreted in your feces and spread throughout the earth to grow.


Except when soaked in water. Moisture signals that conditions are right for sprouting and the protective coatings break down.


QUOTE
Grains require careful preparation because they contain a number of antinutrients that can cause serious health problems. Phytic acid, for example, is an organic acid in which phosphorus is bound. It is mostly found in the bran or outer hull of seeds. Untreated phytic acid can combine with calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and especially zinc in the intestinal tract and block their absorption. This is why a diet high in improperly prepared whole grains may lead to serious mineral deficiencies and bone loss. The modern misguided practice of consuming large amounts of unprocessed bran often improves colon transit time at first but may lead to irritable bowel syndrome and, in the long term, many other adverse effects.

Other antinutrients in whole grains include enzyme inhibitors which can inhibit digestion and put stress on the pancreas; irritating tannins; complex sugars which the body cannot break down; and gluten and related hard-to-digest proteins which may cause allergies, digestive disorders and even mental illness.

Most of these antinutrients are part of the seed's system of preservation—they prevent sprouting until the conditions are right.
Plants need moisture, warmth, time and slight acidity in order to sprout. Proper preparation of grains is a kind and gentle process that imitates the process that occurs in nature. It involves soaking for a period in warm, acidulated water in the preparation of porridge, or long, slow sour dough fermentation in the making of bread. Such processes neutralize phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors. Vitamin content increases, particularly B vitamins. Tannins, complex sugars, gluten and other difficult-to-digest substances are partially broken down into simpler components that are more readily available for absorption.


The full article is at http://www.westonapr...es/be_kind.html


So basically are you backing up/disagreeing with alternavista's statement?
Males - GET AN ELECTRIC RAZOR, so important

Experimenting with:
-no added/un-natural sugar
-no grains bar rice cakes, gluten-free bread & buckwheat pancakes, of which in moderation. Aim for <50g carbs/day
-intermittent fasting and eating smaller amounts more frequently
-daily exercise

What breaks me out: some pastuerised dairy, gluten, SUGAR, probably starch and lectins, sleep deprivation, lack of sun, stress, some other b*tch of a thing I'm yet to discover

Status: at least 90% - very, very close

#24 rakbs

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 03:26 PM

QUOTE (tobias @ Jul 27 2008, 05:02 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So basically are you backing up/disagreeing with alternavista's statement?


Oh, I'm agreeing.

Sorry if that wasn't clear. =P

Clear for 8+ months now through striving for optimal fitness levels, stress levels, sleep, nutrient density in my body, and an overall holistic lifestyle approach.

Diet (I stick to this as much as I can): eggs; meat; poultry; wild-caught seafood; vegetables; fat sources from coconut oil, olive oil, and butter; fruit as I crave it; tea; and purified water. I buy organic and/or pastured foods as I reasonably can, but I think that it's the type of foods you eat, and not the quality of food (within reason, of course) that most determines how healthy you will be.

I highly recommend green smoothies as nutrition powerhouses. They are good on so many levels.

Now experimenting with a higher proportion of legumes, nuts, and seeds in my diet.

I eat absolutely no gluten. I limit intake of all grains, but up to two servings of non-glutenous grain a day is fine. I avoid all added sugar--high fructose corn syrup, sugar, honey, etc. I stay away from soybean oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, and other oils not named olive or coconut. I base my diet off of whole, unprocessed foods, and I prepare them in healthful, delicious ways.

Daily exercise. Sunlight whenever possible.

Supplements: Currently? None. Supplements that have helped in the past (and I can personally recommend) are fish oil, zinc, apple cider vinegar, Vitamin D.

#25 strawberries

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 07:53 PM

I just bought some Chia seeds.. I can't wait to add them to my smoothies. smile.gif

Has anyone tried eating them as spouts? Hows the taste?
I have the power within me to heal myself.

#26 JacJack

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 09:43 PM

QUOTE (iloveuk @ Jun 26 2008, 05:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (blessthefall @ Jun 26 2008, 06:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Does Whole Foods have Chia seeds?


Yours might - mine doesn't


I found a few brand of them in the "whole body" section where they put all the vitamins and stuff

#27 clipse

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 10:40 PM

QUOTE (Mars2008 @ Jul 25 2008, 06:18 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
GNC charges 20 bucks 4 a pound.
Think it's worth the $ 2 replace my flax seed?

eusa_think.gif Is it because i really wana try this in my smoothies.
it all happens so fast it seems, on a cusp for disaster attached to dreams...

#28 Paul25

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 08:39 AM

I was looking at Salba seeds, but then realised they are quite expensive. So now im looking at getting some chia seeds, have they helped anyone at all? I was thinking about putting them in my smoothies.
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#29 Veen

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 08:10 AM

@ rakbs: I used to believe that antinutrients story and actually I still do, but maybe the antinutrients arent such a big deal for us. I think it was Danny who explained that the amount is too small to harm us...

@ chia seeds; sounds like a hype to me... Ill stay with the ground flaxseeds smile.gif
Disease cannot live in a body that is in a healthy emotional state. 

#30 JacJack

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 12:46 AM

QUOTE (strawberries @ Aug 13 2008, 05:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I just bought some Chia seeds.. I can't wait to add them to my smoothies. smile.gif

Has anyone tried eating them as spouts? Hows the taste?


it tastes awful if u chew it alone ( well not exactly awful but it tastes like glue)
it'll become something like jelly if u keep chewing it

I usually mix it in when I bake flaxseed bread or any bakery stuff ( cookies...)
just dont eat it alone X_X

#31 lighterbeing

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Posted 01 September 2008 - 10:26 PM

QUOTE (alternativista @ Feb 5 2008, 08:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Dr. Oz was on Oprah again talking about anti-aging.

He brought up this seed he said he discovered people eating somewhere in South America. However, it's apparently common in Mexico and Central America and were an important staple in Mesoamerica. They make drinks and grind it into a meal. And yes, it is the stuff they sprout out of a chia pet's head.

QUOTE
Unlike flaxseed, chia seeds can be stored for long periods without becoming rancid and don't require grinding (whole flaxseed is tough to digest). Chia provides fiber (about 2 tablespoons--25 g--give you 7 g of fiber) as well as other important nutrients, including calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, copper, niacin, and zinc.


Wikipedia article with links to articles titled things like 'Seeds of Wellness: Return of a Supergrain' and 'Worlds Best Food?'

Chia seed pumpkin muffins which Oz claimed had more magnesium than several heads of broccoli and more calcium than 2 glasses of milk.

I read a book 30 years ago which stated the aztecs would eat chia seeds to survive their all day messenger runs, 40-50 miles in a day.....
I recently found a way that I like them, I mix with unsweetened cocoa, coconut oil (for my
candida), stevia, ground flax seeds, some whey, sunflower seeds and sesame seeds, also almond butter and roll in organic unsweetened coconut. Refrigerate and freeze, great energy!

#32 My Life In Red

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 02:08 PM

I've been using chia seeds off and on for about 6 months. For the past two weeks I started taking two tablespoons a day. I take one tablespoon of seeds in a 32 ounce container of water and shake it up so the seeds don't stick together, wait 10 minutes and drink it over the course of an hour.

I have noticed improvement with my cuticles which are normally dry and peeling. They are healthy now. Also, I no longer have dry eyes. The seeds help boost my energy level and increase my sense of well being.

I don't feel that they can cure acne, but they can help with the dry skin that can sometimes make acne worse.
Formerly Scorpion_Vixen, Scorpioness

#33 alternativista

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 10:58 AM

I've been meaning to mention that my Whole Foods now has chia in the bulk bins at only about $3.99 per pound.


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!

#34 CelloIsLove

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 01:43 PM

Who would have ever guessed?

A question-would the sprouts have similar nutritional value as the seeds, or would eating the seeds be best?

I'm sorry, but this made me laugh so hard thinking of this interview:
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=MufqqVFgUhg
At 1:59

xD

Sorry, I'm done now.

I'm CelloIsLove.

 

Here's the problem I see:

People want to heal their acne through diet and lifestyle. Great. But then they get obsessed only with their skin and not how they FEEL. Physically. Emotionally. What is the quality of your life? It's not directly connected to your flesh, I can tell you that. Then obsess over their food. They hear "diet" and think low-fat, juicing, fasting, cleansing, starving. You're young. Do you really think you have liver failure? Do you really think you need more fiber?

Paleo changed my life. It's the only lifestyle that ever helped me-not just with my skin, but with my life. My happiness. My fitness. It says, "Eat good quality meats. Eat lots of veggies. Eat fruit too. Some nuts. Then go outside. Walk around. See the world. Play with friends. Lift heavy things. Get some sun. Then go sleep, wake up and do it again." What that means to me is to live an enjoyable, happy, dynamic life where I can be the best me for the people I love, not anxious, not angry, not depressed.

Be gentle to your skin, your heart, your tummy, and your life.

Get out there and live.

And also eat bacon.


#35 bɭesstheʄẚɭɭ

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 01:47 PM

I still have chia seeds from last summer in the fridge. Are they still good?????????

#36 alternativista

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 02:23 PM

QUOTE (blessthefall @ Aug 11 2009, 01:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I still have chia seeds from last summer in the fridge. Are they still good?????????


Don't know. But they are supposed to be slow to go rancid. And if there's no mold, then they may be fine.
Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!

#37 Packerfan785

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 02:47 PM

So I don't get it, do they need to be soaked or are they fine to eat straight out of the package?
Please, use Retin-A. It has nearly eliminated my acne and continues to lighten my red marks.

#38 jksl

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 03:22 PM

they'll become slimy if you soak them. I can't stand chia or salba seeds. They make me tired for some reason. My body just doesn't agree with it. I wonder what its phyto-estrogen content is like. I can't find that information anywhere.

#39 Packerfan785

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:36 PM

QUOTE (jksl @ Sep 4 2009, 03:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
they'll become slimy if you soak them. I can't stand chia or salba seeds. They make me tired for some reason. My body just doesn't agree with it. I wonder what its phyto-estrogen content is like. I can't find that information anywhere.


I thought it wasn't supposed to have any.

Now I'm really confused.

1) Can they be digested well raw?

2) Do they contain estrogen?

Please, use Retin-A. It has nearly eliminated my acne and continues to lighten my red marks.

#40 jksl

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:56 PM

Well, according to wikipedia

"foods with the highest relative phytoestrogen content were nuts and oilseeds, followed by soy products, cereals and breads, legumes, meat products, and other processed foods that may contain soy, vegetables, fruits, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic beverages. Flax seed and other oilseeds contained the highest total phytoestrogen content, followed by soy bean and tofu. The highest concentrations of Isoflavones are found in soy bean and soy bean products followed by legumes, whereas lignans are the primary source of phytoestrogen found in nuts and oilseeds (e.g. flax) and also found in cereals, legumes, fruits and vegetables.

Phytoestrogen content varies in different foods, and may vary significantly within the same group of foods (e.g. soy beverages, tofu) depending on processing mechanisms and type of soy bean used. Legumes (in particular soybeans), whole grain cereals, and some seeds are high in phytoestrogen. A more comprehensive list of foods known to contain phytoestrogens includes: soy beans, tofu, tempeh, soy beverages, linseed (flax), sesame seeds, wheat, berries, oats, barley, dried beans, lentils, yams, rice, alfalfa, mung beans, apples, carrots, pomegranates, wheat germ, ricebran, soy linseed bread, ginseng, bourbon and beer, fennel and anise."

So, it should have phytoestrogens. I just don't know how much. I can't find that info anywhere.

All i know is chia seed made me sick every time i had some. As far as i know, it could have been contributing to my acne when it was at its worst. That's around the time i was taking chia seed. But, i was also taking flax and i know for a fact that crap gives me cystic neck acne. Anyway, estrogenic foods like soy and flax are bad news for me, so i've been staying away from nuts and seeds. I don't have any neck acne anymore. Just an odd small pimple once every week or two that i'm not too concerned about.

Anyway, IMO, guys should just get their omega 3 fatty acids from fish sources. Males cannot convert the Alpha Linolenic Acid from plant/seed sources to EPA and especially DHA as readily as females can.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15075703

Also, consider the following:

"Although studies have found that regular consumption of fish (which includes the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA) may reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a recent study including two large groups of men and women found that diets rich in alpha-linolenic acid may substantially increase the risk of this disease. Until more is known, people with macular degeneration may want to obtain omega-3 fatty acids from sources of EPA and DHA, rather than alpha-linolenic acid.

Similarly, fish and fish oil may protect against prostate cancer, but alpha-linolenic acid may be associated with increased risk of prostate cancer in men. "

http://www.umm.edu/a...enic-000284.htm

If you're a guy, get your EPA and DHA from fish oil, cod liver oil, krill oil, etc.