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Why Your Skin Isn't Clear Yet

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First, for those of you who don't want much background and want to skip to the cure, read this article I just wrote: The Real Acne Cure.

I have been doing a lot of research and experimentation lately that has led me to make some radical changes in my ideas of what truly causes acne.

There are two main things that got me thinking...maybe gluten and dairy aren't truly what is causing acne...

1) I noticed many people here who can tolerate gluten and dairy in "small amounts" and some who can tolerate it even in large amounts. Others could tolerate low-carb dairy. Also people reported that they break out from all sorts of fruits, fructose, sugar and especially oranges (which was a major clue that I will get to later).

2) An experiment I did with sleep. I worked on my sleep schedule so it was essentially perfect. I was getting about 8.5 hours of sleep a night every night for a while, waking up at sunrise, sleeping in complete darkness and going to bed and waking up at the same time everyday.

And something very interesting happened. My metabolism slowed down dramatically. Carbs stopped making me feel bad. I started eating horrible foods like pizza, hot dogs, etc. and nothing happened (well other than few digestion problems and headaches, but what can you expect :D ). Most importantly, I did not break out from these foods which previously would break me out always!

So how are these things connected? What's going on?

Well, the key lies in metabolic balance.

I truly believe that the root cause of acne is a metabolism that is out of balance.

The number one thing you can do to keep your metabolism in check is to eat right for your metabolic type. This is what I have been doing for quite some time now. I am a protein type, so I eat tons of meat and fat and very low carb. This is what is keeping my skin clear, not just avoiding gluten and dairy.

While I do believe gluten and dairy may cause conditions that lead to acne, I don't think it matters if you are in metabolic balance. Your body can deal with the problems gluten and dairy cause as long as it is in balance.

So the number one thing everyone can do who is not clear yet is eat right for your metabolic type. My article explains a bit how to do that.

Poor sleep can also throw your metabolism out of balance by increasing a hormone called ghrelin that causes your stomach to empty faster. This can cause major blood sugar problems because foods are being absorbed far too quickly. When you are in a state like this, even small amounts of carbohydrates can cause many problems which include acne.

While it is not absolutely necessary to have perfect sleep if you are eating right for your metabolic type already, perfect sleep is a way to change your metabolic type so you will essentially be able to eat anything you want! For some though, perfect sleep may be even more restricting than a diet, so it is a choice you can make on your own.

For me personally, I have noticed that even one night of bad sleep will throw me off balance, and I'll have to eat a lot more meat and fat the next day.

Anyway, enough rambling, here's the article again: The Real Acne Cure

I hope you enjoy it.

- Jesse

P.S. So why do oranges cause acne for many people? Because they are very strong carb type foods! If you are a protein type and sometimes even a mixed type, oranges are a recipe for disaster as far as your skin and your entire body is concerned.


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Excellent, thanks for the information. Diet is one thing I have under control. I just need to work on my sleep, I'm sure it will help. My sleeping habbits are pretty awful, so I need to work on them.

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nice research. I like reading your stuff. Is there any way you could come up with a way to test your metabolic type for free?

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Thx for posting that ^^ i knew it was ok to eat pizza etc ^^ sometime :)


Best way to make your skin smooth and clear eventually:

Plant-based diet is the best medicine for everything.. That's if you consume at least 80% raw, mainly from veggies and fruits.

Exercising: cardio is great for skin and lifting a bit.

Thinking positive and try not to stress or think about acne.

I am doing these and my skin is currently very smooth and clearing up!

I am a vegan raw 100%. I feel better, have more energy, saving animals a year, glow skin, I look younger, etc.


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Hi, thanks for the information. I'm just wondering, for how long did you experiment with your sleep? I remember a while ago I had read somewhere that you were using a dawn simulator, so do you still use it? Also, when you talk about metabolism, does this also relate to cellular metabolism? I've read that if one's cellular metabolism is too fast (and subsequently sloppy), food is not broken down properly, the right nutrients are not attained, and a whole host of problems arise. For instance, if one has a fast metabolism, and is able to maintain the same weight regardless of what/how much one eats, does that reflect a fast/sloppy cellular metabolism?


"If you are reading this then this warning is for you. Every word you read of this useless fine print is another second off your life. Don't you have other things to do? Is your life so empty that you honestly can't think of a better way to spend these moments? Or are you so impressed with authority that you give respect and credence to all who claim it? Do you read everything you're supposed to read? Do you think everything you're supposed to think? Buy what you're told you should want? Get out of your apartment. Meet a member of the opposite sex. Stop the excessive shopping and masturbation. Quit your job. Start a fight. Prove you're alive. If you don't claim your humanity you will become a statistic. You have been warned..." -- Fight Club


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Well I guess I'm in trouble. I work nights, so having a good sleeping pattern is almost impossible for me. I've been working nights for about 5 years. I usually don't get to go to sleep until 5-6am...however I try to get at least 6-7 hours of it. Does it matter when you actually go to bed, or does it just matter how much sleep you get in general?


My Reg: Updated on June 28, '08

Diet ~ Organic meat such as chicken, turkey, beef. Organic free-range eggs, Real butter, Rice, Salmon, Wheat/Gluten-free bread, Pure natural peanut butter, Tomatoes, Apples, Coconut, Blueberries, Green smoothies, Nuts - especially almonds and walnuts, Homemade almond milk, Herbal Tea, Olive oil, Coconut Oil, Garlic, Sea salt. I like to use Stevia and Raw honey as natural sweeteners.

My guilty pleasure: Coffee (without sugar & dairy)

Avoid ~ Wheat/Gluten, Dairy, Sugar, Pork, Citrus fruits especially oranges and grapefruit.

Fitness ~ Taking my dog for a jog. Mini-Trampoline. Stretching. Looking into yoga.

Supplements ~ Vitamin D3, Magnesium, PomXel CB by North Star (from the coffeeberry - an amazing supplement - look it up!), Lymph system and blood cleansing herbs.

Facial products ~ Herbal soap followed by baking soda rinse, Clay mask once a week, Vaseline moisturizer in some dry areas, I exfoliate with honey & oats twice per week.

Other ~ Change pillowcase every night, drink about 6 glasses of water per day, Sleep 6-7 hours, Bath 1-2 times per week while reading mags and listening to music, Get plenty of sun in the summer (NO sunscreen!), Meditation when I remember.


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Well I guess I'm in trouble. I work nights, so having a good sleeping pattern is almost impossible for me. I've been working nights for about 5 years. I usually don't get to go to sleep until 5-6am...however I try to get at least 6-7 hours of it. Does it matter when you actually go to bed, or does it just matter how much sleep you get in general?

Doesn't matter if day or night... is not like The lights will do something to ur skin :D

just close eyes and sleep ^^

I saw in proactiv solution guide that sleeping 7-8 hours is good it helps..

sleeping longer is bad

and i do sleep long :( i will try to sleep 7-8 hours only.


Best way to make your skin smooth and clear eventually:

Plant-based diet is the best medicine for everything.. That's if you consume at least 80% raw, mainly from veggies and fruits.

Exercising: cardio is great for skin and lifting a bit.

Thinking positive and try not to stress or think about acne.

I am doing these and my skin is currently very smooth and clearing up!

I am a vegan raw 100%. I feel better, have more energy, saving animals a year, glow skin, I look younger, etc.


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If you follow all of the optimal sleep guidelines and try to get lots of sleep (I recommend 9 hours for most people), you will find that your acne miraculously clears up and you won’t even have to worry about what you eat."

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Anecdotally, my skin tends to look much healthier after a long sleep. Healing, I would think, occurs much more readily while sleeping. Plus it's a long period of time over which I'm not checking a mirror, so incremental changes have a chance to add up.


Minocycline saved my skin.


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One of the things that makes sleep healing is it promotes proper breathing. When you sleep you naturally start beathing deep and slow. It helps if you breathe like that constantly. Set aside 5 minutes in the morning and evening to practice breathing deep and slow in the same way you would when asleep, so that it become automatic when awake.

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Any tips on how to fall asleep quickly?


DIET

[*] Mostly meats: chicken, ground beef and sometimes pork

[*] Smoked salmon

[*] Eggs

[*] Drink 2l of water each day

[*] Nuts: almonds, walnuts

[*] Veggies: onions, bell peppers, avocados, carrots,...

[*] Fruits: Limited to once a day

-> every meal consists of meat + a smaller portion of veggies

[*]Avoid: refined foods/dairy/sugar/bread

SUPPLEMENTS

[*] Omega3

[*] Vitamin C

[*] Chromium

STATUS: started 07/01


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Its usually best to turn the tv off or your computer off 30 minutes before you go to bed, as the stimulation has a lasting effect on your brain. So that might help possibly. I also read that if you wear socks to bed it helps you fall asleep faster, I can't remember where I read that so I don't have the information behind the idea.

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And something very interesting happened. My metabolism slowed down dramatically. Carbs stopped making me feel bad. I started eating horrible foods like pizza, hot dogs, etc. and nothing happened (well other than few digestion problems and headaches, but what can you expect ). Most importantly, I did not break out from these foods which previously would break me out always!

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Hey Healthoid!

Another great article! :clap: Very interesting, i am currently still fine tunning my diet(protein type.) The info about the food groups you have listed for different metabolic types was highly useful for me! I noticed some people claim to have intolerances to Fructose(unrelated to article.), do you think it to be a factor, or (as you suggested about oranges)just a metabolic issue? I Like to snack in between meals(Morning tea, afternoon tea etc.) Do you have any good suggestions? I'm currently having pecans or walnuts with sultanas with a low carb fruit.. :cool:

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P.S. So why do oranges cause acne for many people? Because they are very strong carb type foods! If you are a protein type and sometimes even a mixed type, oranges are a recipe for disaster as far as your skin and your entire body is concerned.

I agree about the sleep. Although I slept well for most of my acne years, I had a problem for a a year or so (work hour related) that took me a while to get over, but I started making sure I got plenty of sleep about the same time that I changed my diet and my skin cleared. Sleep is also one of the best things to help with stress.

But I think people who notice a specific breakout from eating an orange have an allergy. I am allergic per tests and cysts appear by the next day. Simple carbs on the other hand, cause oily skin, blackheads, minor inflamed acne, etc, but only when they are a major part of my diet.


Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


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P.S. So why do oranges cause acne for many people? Because they are very strong carb type foods! If you are a protein type and sometimes even a mixed type, oranges are a recipe for disaster as far as your skin and your entire body is concerned.

I agree about the sleep. Although I slept well for most of my acne years, I had a problem for a a year or so (work hour related) that took me a while to get over, but I started making sure I got plenty of sleep about the same time that I changed my diet and my skin cleared. Sleep is also one of the best things to help with stress.

But I think people who notice a specific breakout from eating an orange have an allergy. I am allergic per tests and cysts appear by the next day. Simple carbs on the other hand, cause oily skin, blackheads, minor inflamed acne, etc, but only when they are a major part of my diet.

I agree, I think acne from oranges is allergy related. Citrus is in the top 8 most common allergenic foods.

I read about a study (link)a few weeks ago how how disrupted sleep can give people diabetic tendencies, even in healthy people who prior to the test had a completely normal sugar metabolism. But I have think we need to take a look at what we consider "normal" sugar metabolism. Could it be that the reason we would need such deep repairative sleep is because our diet damages our body every day?

In most non-western cultures, fragmented sleep is the norm rather than the exception (link). Here's a quote from that article, called "Sleeping like a Hunter-Gatherer":

Worthman flipped open a book and showed me photographs of big families piled into large, sprawling huts, little kids peeking up from the arms of Mom, older generations wrapped leisurely around the fireplace. “Forager groups are a good place to start, because for much of human history we’ve been occupied with their mode of existence,” she said. “There are the !Kung of Botswana and the Efe of Zaire. For both of these groups, sleep is a very fluid state. They sleep when they feel like it—during the day, in the evening, in the dead of night.”

This, said Worthman, is true of other groups too—the Achof Paraguay, for example. Late-night sleep, when it happens, is practically a social activity. In addition to procreation, the night is a time of “ritual, sociality, and information exchange.” People crash together in big multigenerational heaps—women with infants, wheezing seniors, domestic animals, chatting hunter buddies stoking the fire—everyone embedded in one big, dynamic, “sensorily rich environment.” This kind of environment is important, said Worthman, because “it provides you with subliminal cues about what is going on, that you are not alone, that you are safe in the social world.”

The more Worthman learned about the communal and interactive nature of non-Western sleep, the more she came to see Western sleep as the strange exception. She laughed again. “It’s funny, because as an anthropologist I’m used to getting weirded out a bit—I mean, you wouldn’t believe the things people do. So after collecting all this material I look at my own bed and go, ‘This is really weird.’”

Western sleep, said Worthman, is arid and controlled, with a heavy emphasis on individualism and the “decontextualized person.” Contact is kept to a minimum. The apparent conflict with marriage co-sleeping norms, she notes elsewhere, “has been partially mitigated for Americans by the evolution of bed size from twin, to double, to queen, to king.” She lifted her thin arms and drew a big box in the air. “I mean, think about it—this thing, this bed, is really a gigantic sleep machine. You’ve got a steel frame that comes up from the floor, a bottom mattress that looks totally machinelike, then all these heavily padded surfaces—blankets and pillows and sheets.”

It’s true. Most of us sleep alone in the dark, floating three feet off the ground but also buried under five layers of bedding. I had the sudden image of an armada of solitary humanoids in their big puffy spaceships drifting slowly through the silent and airless immensity of space. “Whoa,” I said.

Worthman nodded. “I know, I know, so weird.”

By contrast, village life is one big, messy block party, crackling with sex, intrigue, and poultry. In these cultures, interrupted or polyphasic sleep is the norm, which jibes with findings about still other cultures, like the Temiars of Indonesia and the Ibans of Sarawak, 25 percent of whom are apparently active at any one point in the night.


Last updated 03/26/10

Supplements

- 50,000 IU Vitamin D once a week

- 250 - 500mgs calcium citrate per day

- 1,000mgs Vitamin C per day

General Dietary Principles

- Only consume manually pressed/organic oils and fats to avoid pesticides and hexane

- Avoid high fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners

- Avoid hydrogenated oils

- Snack frequently (important!)

- Include high fiber foods like beans (chili yum!), trail mix (good for the frequent snacks), and raw veggies (also good as a snack with ranch dressing).

- Make sure I get enough sodium chloride (salt) throughout the day (good sources include ranch dressing (yummy with the raw veggies), chili, and pickles.


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P.S. So why do oranges cause acne for many people? Because they are very strong carb type foods! If you are a protein type and sometimes even a mixed type, oranges are a recipe for disaster as far as your skin and your entire body is concerned.

I agree about the sleep. Although I slept well for most of my acne years, I had a problem for a a year or so (work hour related) that took me a while to get over, but I started making sure I got plenty of sleep about the same time that I changed my diet and my skin cleared. Sleep is also one of the best things to help with stress.

But I think people who notice a specific breakout from eating an orange have an allergy. I am allergic per tests and cysts appear by the next day. Simple carbs on the other hand, cause oily skin, blackheads, minor inflamed acne, etc, but only when they are a major part of my diet.

I agree, I think acne from oranges is allergy related. Citrus is in the top 8 most common allergenic foods.

I did read about a study (link)a few weeks ago how how disrupted sleep can give people diabetic tendencies, even in healthy people who prior to the test had a completely normal sugar metabolism, so I have no doubt that good uninterrupted sleep will help.

However, in many non-western cultures, fragmented sleep is the norm rather than the exception (link). So I'm not sure what conclusion to come to as far as the role of sleep in acne. Here's a quote from that article:

Worthman flipped open a book and showed me photographs of big families piled into large, sprawling huts, little kids peeking up from the arms of Mom, older generations wrapped leisurely around the fireplace. “Forager groups are a good place to start, because for much of human history we’ve been occupied with their mode of existence,” she said. “There are the !Kung of �Botswana and the Efe of Zaire. For both of these groups, sleep is a very fluid state. They sleep when they feel like it—during the day, in the evening, in the dead of night.”

It was once the norm in western cultures as well and not just hunter gatherers. They've found references in literature to first and second sleep. Before electricity, peasant types especially, would be too tired after a days work to do much in the evening and would sleep, then wake up later for various activities. They'd even visit neighbors.

Status: Clear after 30 years. Wow, I guess it's been 6 years, now.

[ Story: Severe Acne since I was 10. 10+ years of Dermatologists, Antibiotics, topicals and ACCUTANE did nothing. Discovered oranges triggered the worst of my cystic acne = about 70% improvement. Tried some nutrient supplements like B-complex with zinc and C, saw palmetto and a BHA like the aspirin mask = more improvement, a lot less oily. Then, Diet changes = Clear.

Regimen: Anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, blood sugar stabilizing diet and supplements (for hormones, inflammation, aging, health). No soap or other cleanser except for hand washing! Water only or Oil cleanse. Aloe Vera mixed with niacinimide and a high linoleic acid oil for moisturizer and reduce pigmentation.

Diet effects acne in so many ways: hormone balance, inflammation, Insulin levels, digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, SHBG levels, sebum quality, cell function and turnover, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, etc. Basic advice: Eat, sleep, supplement and exercise like you are a diabetic. And eat real food!

For more information, see my Good Things for Acne thread *Moderator edit - Please refer to the board rules (see “Advertising/soliciting”, “Linking” and “Signatures”)*

When you eat stuff, Stuff Happens!


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P.S. So why do oranges cause acne for many people? Because they are very strong carb type foods! If you are a protein type and sometimes even a mixed type, oranges are a recipe for disaster as far as your skin and your entire body is concerned.

I agree about the sleep. Although I slept well for most of my acne years, I had a problem for a a year or so (work hour related) that took me a while to get over, but I started making sure I got plenty of sleep about the same time that I changed my diet and my skin cleared. Sleep is also one of the best things to help with stress.

But I think people who notice a specific breakout from eating an orange have an allergy. I am allergic per tests and cysts appear by the next day. Simple carbs on the other hand, cause oily skin, blackheads, minor inflamed acne, etc, but only when they are a major part of my diet.

I agree, I think acne from oranges is allergy related. Citrus is in the top 8 most common allergenic foods.

I did read about a study (link)a few weeks ago how how disrupted sleep can give people diabetic tendencies, even in healthy people who prior to the test had a completely normal sugar metabolism, so I have no doubt that good uninterrupted sleep will help.

However, in many non-western cultures, fragmented sleep is the norm rather than the exception (link). So I'm not sure what conclusion to come to as far as the role of sleep in acne. Here's a quote from that article:

Worthman flipped open a book and showed me photographs of big families piled into large, sprawling huts, little kids peeking up from the arms of Mom, older generations wrapped leisurely around the fireplace. “Forager groups are a good place to start, because for much of human history we’ve been occupied with their mode of existence,” she said. “There are the !Kung of �Botswana and the Efe of Zaire. For both of these groups, sleep is a very fluid state. They sleep when they feel like it—during the day, in the evening, in the dead of night.”

It was once the norm in western cultures as well and not just hunter gatherers. They've found references in literature to first and second sleep. Before electricity, peasant types especially, would be too tired after a days work to do much in the evening and would sleep, then wake up later for various activities. They'd even visit neighbors.

Exactly. And so now in the western lifestyle, where sleep is supposedly "better" than other cultures, we have 95% plus of the population experiencing acne at one time or another, whereas in non western cultures where sleep is being broken up and disrupted constantly, they don't have acne. But they don't have refined foods in their cultures, and we do. So, their diet basically lets them sleep however they want, broken up, fragmented social experience that it is, and still have little to no incidences of acne, diabetes, heart disease, etc.

So overall, I don't think sleep is the problem, I still think diet is. The only reason we would need such intense sleep is because our bodies are so damaged by what we're eating every day. Sleep is when we repair ourselves...and apparently, we need a lot of work.

Last updated 03/26/10

Supplements

- 50,000 IU Vitamin D once a week

- 250 - 500mgs calcium citrate per day

- 1,000mgs Vitamin C per day

General Dietary Principles

- Only consume manually pressed/organic oils and fats to avoid pesticides and hexane

- Avoid high fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners

- Avoid hydrogenated oils

- Snack frequently (important!)

- Include high fiber foods like beans (chili yum!), trail mix (good for the frequent snacks), and raw veggies (also good as a snack with ranch dressing).

- Make sure I get enough sodium chloride (salt) throughout the day (good sources include ranch dressing (yummy with the raw veggies), chili, and pickles.


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Naturally an optimal metabolism is necessary for optimal health and for eliminating acne.

But acne is caused by hormones which are out of balance (and also by toxins in your body, I think). Eating the wrong foods can contribute to the hormonal imbalance, so yes its A cause, but I dont think its THE cure.

There are so many factors which can mess up your hormones, I think you have to address them as well. Just eating right for your metabolic type (if theres such a thing, I think those tests are a scam, but I still have to look into it further), probably wont clear your acne and maybe doesnt even balance your metabolism.

I would go for overall optimal metabolism. This means healing a leaky gut, correcting food allergies, nutritional deficiencies heavy metal detox, reduce inflammation and stress...

So many factors... I still have to address the most

I do think sleep is important, especially if your out of balance. ANd oranges causing acne has to be a food allergy.


Disease cannot live in a body that is in a healthy emotional state. 


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what time did you sleep during this test ?

I went to bed around 9 hours before sunrise where I live.

nice research. I like reading your stuff. Is there any way you could come up with a way to test your metabolic type for free?

I wish there was a good reliable free test, but unfortunately there is not. I wish the Metabolic Typing people or the Mercola guys would release it for free.

Hi, thanks for the information. I'm just wondering, for how long did you experiment with your sleep? I remember a while ago I had read somewhere that you were using a dawn simulator, so do you still use it? Also, when you talk about metabolism, does this also relate to cellular metabolism? I've read that if one's cellular metabolism is too fast (and subsequently sloppy), food is not broken down properly, the right nutrients are not attained, and a whole host of problems arise. For instance, if one has a fast metabolism, and is able to maintain the same weight regardless of what/how much one eats, does that reflect a fast/sloppy cellular metabolism?

I have been experimenting with my sleep for a very long time now, a couple years.

When I talk about metabolism, I am talking primarily about cellular metabolism. Yes, if you cannot gain weight at all, are very skinny, etc., it typically means your cellular metabolism is out of balance. Usually it means it's too fast.

Well I guess I'm in trouble. I work nights, so having a good sleeping pattern is almost impossible for me. I've been working nights for about 5 years. I usually don't get to go to sleep until 5-6am...however I try to get at least 6-7 hours of it. Does it matter when you actually go to bed, or does it just matter how much sleep you get in general?

When you go to bed DOES matter, because your body uses light to entrain its circadian rhythm. If there is lots of light while you are sleeping, it can cause problems. However, if you are somehow able to make your sleeping area completely dark, even during the day, you shouldn't have any issues. I also recommend much more than 6-7 hours of sleep if you're trying to improve your skin. 9 is a good number to go for.

If you follow all of the optimal sleep guidelines and try to get lots of sleep (I recommend 9 hours for most people), you will find that your acne miraculously clears up and you won�€™t even have to worry about what you eat."

is this based on your own experience or some other data?

cause it sounds too simple... :snooty:

Yeah, I know it sounds ridiculously simple. But based on years of research, experiments on myself as well as observations of others, I truly believe sleep is a huge factor. In the future I will compile a list of evidence that I have acquired toward this hypothesis, but initially I just wanted to get this out so people could start using it.

Any tips on how to fall asleep quickly?

Follow my optimal sleep guidelines. The key is darkness and light. Once you entrain your sleep rhythm using darkness and light (this can take a week or so to get in a good rhythm, during that time you just have to force yourself to stay in bed), your body will naturally fall asleep at the right time.

I also recommend eating right for your metabolic type in order to improve sleep.

Hey Healthoid!

Another great article! :clap: Very interesting, i am currently still fine tunning my diet(protein type.) The info about the food groups you have listed for different metabolic types was highly useful for me! I noticed some people claim to have intolerances to Fructose(unrelated to article.), do you think it to be a factor, or (as you suggested about oranges)just a metabolic issue? I Like to snack in between meals(Morning tea, afternoon tea etc.) Do you have any good suggestions? I'm currently having pecans or walnuts with sultanas with a low carb fruit.. :cool:

People who get acne from eating fructose are typically going to be mixed types or protein types. They are simply eating too much sugar for their metabolism and it is getting out of balance.

If you get hungry between meals, I recommend working on the quality and quantity of your sleep and also if you are a protein type, eating more medium-high purine meat and fat at each meal. Both of these should curb your appetite dramatically and help keep your metabolism in balance.

P.S. So why do oranges cause acne for many people? Because they are very strong carb type foods! If you are a protein type and sometimes even a mixed type, oranges are a recipe for disaster as far as your skin and your entire body is concerned.

I agree about the sleep. Although I slept well for most of my acne years, I had a problem for a a year or so (work hour related) that took me a while to get over, but I started making sure I got plenty of sleep about the same time that I changed my diet and my skin cleared. Sleep is also one of the best things to help with stress.

But I think people who notice a specific breakout from eating an orange have an allergy. I am allergic per tests and cysts appear by the next day. Simple carbs on the other hand, cause oily skin, blackheads, minor inflamed acne, etc, but only when they are a major part of my diet.

I would say that the simple carbs and the oranges are both part of the same problem; eating foods that aren't right for your metabolic type.

I read about a study (link)a few weeks ago how how disrupted sleep can give people diabetic tendencies, even in healthy people who prior to the test had a completely normal sugar metabolism. But I have think we need to take a look at what we consider "normal" sugar metabolism. Could it be that the reason we would need such deep repairative sleep is because our diet damages our body every day?

In most non-western cultures, fragmented sleep is the norm rather than the exception (link). Here's a quote from that article, called "Sleeping like a Hunter-Gatherer":

Worthman flipped open a book and showed me photographs of big families piled into large, sprawling huts, little kids peeking up from the arms of Mom, older generations wrapped leisurely around the fireplace. “Forager groups are a good place to start, because for much of human history we’ve been occupied with their mode of existence,” she said. “There are the !Kung of �Botswana and the Efe of Zaire. For both of these groups, sleep is a very fluid state. They sleep when they feel like it—during the day, in the evening, in the dead of night.”

This, said Worthman, is true of other groups too—the Ach� of Paraguay, for example. Late-night sleep, when it happens, is practically a social activity. In addition to procreation, the night is a time of “ritual, sociality, and information exchange.” People crash together in big multigenerational heaps—women with infants, wheezing seniors, domestic animals, chatting hunter buddies stoking the fire—everyone embedded in one big, dynamic, “sensorily rich environment.” This kind of environment is important, said Worthman, because “it provides you with subliminal cues about what is going on, that you are not alone, that you are safe in the social world.”

The more Worthman learned about the communal and interactive nature of non-Western sleep, the more she came to see Western sleep as the strange exception. She laughed again. “It’s funny, because as an anthropologist I’m used to getting weirded out a bit—I mean, you wouldn’t believe the things people do. So after collecting all this material I look at my own bed and go, ‘This is really weird.’”

Western sleep, said Worthman, is arid and controlled, with a heavy emphasis on individualism and the “decontextualized person.” Contact is kept to a minimum. The apparent conflict with marriage co-sleeping norms, she notes elsewhere, “has been partially mitigated for Americans by the evolution of bed size from twin, to double, to queen, to king.” She lifted her thin arms and drew a big box in the air. “I mean, think about it—this thing, this bed, is really a gigantic sleep machine. You’ve got a steel frame that comes up from the floor, a bottom mattress that looks totally machinelike, then all these heavily padded surfaces—blankets and pillows and sheets.”

It’s true. Most of us sleep alone in the dark, floating three feet off the ground but also buried under five layers of bedding. I had the sudden image of an armada of solitary humanoids in their big puffy spaceships drifting slowly through the silent and airless immensity of space. “Whoa,” I said.

Worthman nodded. “I know, I know, so weird.”

By contrast, village life is one big, messy block party, crackling with sex, intrigue, and poultry. In these cultures, interrupted or polyphasic sleep is the norm, which jibes with findings about still other cultures, like the Temiars of Indonesia and the Ibans of Sarawak, 25 percent of whom are apparently active at any one point in the night.

But these cultures don't have light-bulbs right? They use fire right? There is a huge difference in the amount of light produced by fire and the amount produced by lightbulbs. Especially when you start factoring in the light from things like computer monitors and TV, night lights, light from streelights coming in through windows, etc. I can guarantee you, they get far more darkness than anyone in modern civilization.

You are right though about the drastic hormonal and metabolic changes that occur with poor sleep. This is primarily what causes people's metabolism to get out of balance and can cause acne.


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Naturally an optimal metabolism is necessary for optimal health and for eliminating acne.

But acne is caused by hormones which are out of balance (and also by toxins in your body, I think). Eating the wrong foods can contribute to the hormonal imbalance, so yes its A cause, but I dont think its THE cure.

There are so many factors which can mess up your hormones, I think you have to address them as well. Just eating right for your metabolic type (if theres such a thing, I think those tests are a scam, but I still have to look into it further), probably wont clear your acne and maybe doesnt even balance your metabolism.

I would go for overall optimal metabolism. This means healing a leaky gut, correcting food allergies, nutritional deficiencies heavy metal detox, reduce inflammation and stress...

So many factors... I still have to address the most

I do think sleep is important, especially if your out of balance. ANd oranges causing acne has to be a food allergy.

You say acne is hormonal...

but foods change hormones

and sleep changes hormones.

I agree, that acne can have many causes, but there are going to be minor causes and major causes and I believe the two largest causes are:

1) Not eating right for your metabolic type.

2) Poor sleep, causing a further unbalanced metabolism.


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But these cultures don't have light-bulbs right? They use fire right? There is a huge difference in the amount of light produced by fire and the amount produced by lightbulbs. Especially when you start factoring in the light from things like computer monitors and TV, night lights, light from streelights coming in through windows, etc. I can guarantee you, they get far more darkness than anyone in modern civilization.

Last updated 03/26/10

Supplements

- 50,000 IU Vitamin D once a week

- 250 - 500mgs calcium citrate per day

- 1,000mgs Vitamin C per day

General Dietary Principles

- Only consume manually pressed/organic oils and fats to avoid pesticides and hexane

- Avoid high fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners

- Avoid hydrogenated oils

- Snack frequently (important!)

- Include high fiber foods like beans (chili yum!), trail mix (good for the frequent snacks), and raw veggies (also good as a snack with ranch dressing).

- Make sure I get enough sodium chloride (salt) throughout the day (good sources include ranch dressing (yummy with the raw veggies), chili, and pickles.


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But these cultures don't have light-bulbs right? They use fire right? There is a huge difference in the amount of light produced by fire and the amount produced by lightbulbs. Especially when you start factoring in the light from things like computer monitors and TV, night lights, light from streelights coming in through windows, etc. I can guarantee you, they get far more darkness than anyone in modern civilization.

So in that case, it wouldn't matter how much or when your sleep was, as long as all your lights were turned on or off in accordance with sunrise and sunset? Because these people are up half the night, and a good chunk of their sleep is during the day. Which means you don't need to sleep in absolute darkness, and it doesn't need to be undisrupted.

One question I would ask is, how much sleep per day on average did these people get in near-complete darkness? Did it change based on the season?

Also, how much did their specific genetics factor into their lifestyle?

For example, obviously not everyone who gets poor sleep has acne. There is definitely still a genetic factor.


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