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Low-glycemic diet found to prevent acne.......

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A diet with a low glycemic load may reduce the occurrence of acne in men, according to a small study conducted by researchers from the RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia and reported in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Researchers divided 43 men with acne into two groups. The men in one group (high glycemic load) were encouraged to eat plenty of carbohydrates; the men in the other group were told to replace the high glycemic load foods in their diets with other foods that had a lower glycemic load and more protein.

Glycemic load refers to the effect that a food has on a person's blood sugar. High glycemic load foods cause blood sugar to spike, while low glycemic load foods cause a more gradual, longer-lasting increase. High glycemic load foods are those high in low-fiber carbohydrates, such as refined sugars and grains. Low glycemic foods include complex carbohydrates high in fiber.

After 12 weeks, the number of acne lesions among men in the low-glycemic load group dropped by approximately 22. Among the men in the high-glycemic load group, the number of acne lesions dropped by approximately 14.

"The results of this study open up the prospect that nutrition-related lifestyle factors may affect the [development] of acne," the researchers wrote.

In addition, levels of the male sex hormone androgen decreased and insulin sensitivity increased more in the low glycemic load group than in the high glycemic load group. Men eating the lower glycemic diet also lost weight.

The researchers said that with the way the study was set up, it was impossible to know what exactly led to the decrease in acne. The weight loss or the improved insulin sensitivity -- or both -- are the most likely, but "these results should be considered preliminary and larger scale studies are needed to confirm the effect of dietary intervention on acne."

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Refined sugar is the devil even if it doesn't affect acne.

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A diet with a low glycemic load may reduce the occurrence of acne in men, according to a small study conducted by researchers from the RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia and reported in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Researchers divided 43 men with acne into two groups. The men in one group (high glycemic load) were encouraged to eat plenty of carbohydrates; the men in the other group were told to replace the high glycemic load foods in their diets with other foods that had a lower glycemic load and more protein.

Glycemic load refers to the effect that a food has on a person's blood sugar. High glycemic load foods cause blood sugar to spike, while low glycemic load foods cause a more gradual, longer-lasting increase. High glycemic load foods are those high in low-fiber carbohydrates, such as refined sugars and grains. Low glycemic foods include complex carbohydrates high in fiber.

After 12 weeks, the number of acne lesions among men in the low-glycemic load group dropped by approximately 22. Among the men in the high-glycemic load group, the number of acne lesions dropped by approximately 14.

"The results of this study open up the prospect that nutrition-related lifestyle factors may affect the [development] of acne," the researchers wrote.

In addition, levels of the male sex hormone androgen decreased and insulin sensitivity increased more in the low glycemic load group than in the high glycemic load group. Men eating the lower glycemic diet also lost weight.

The researchers said that with the way the study was set up, it was impossible to know what exactly led to the decrease in acne. The weight loss or the improved insulin sensitivity -- or both -- are the most likely, but "these results should be considered preliminary and larger scale studies are needed to confirm the effect of dietary intervention on acne."

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I think the problem with these diet studies is that they alter the diets so much, and change so many things that it is difficult to tell which of the changes are responsible for the observed effects. The dietary changes they made for these boys is so extremely different on so many levels from the typical teenage boy diet, that its hard to know if it is the low glycemic nature of the diet, or simply the fact that they cut out lots of junk food (which also has acne triggers such as iodized salt). Even the authors point out this limitation of the study towards the end of the article. I would like to see further research that controlled for some of these other confounding factors.

Plus, this study was funded and partly conducted by the meat and poultry industry in Australia - they aren't exactly an unbiased group when it comes to advocating for a high protein diet.

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these studies make no sense logically for numerous reasons which leads me to question even their legitimacy.

number one they are based on the glycemic load which is supposed to somehow judge how fast these studies spike your blood sugar and consequently insulin levels. But it has been shown that foods like meat and dairy products actually release more insulin than some junk food and carb foods. and number 2 the body is extremely efficient at controlling blood sugar levels (which at max can fluctuate up to 32% above normal levels) unlike the way it is at controlling redundant protein levels (has been seen to go up to 900% above)

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One recent study said that it looked like the liver reduces the secretion of a testosterone lowering chemical when the liver is turning carbohydrates (mainly fructose) into fats.

The thing is that's not caused by high insulin or glycemic index, but may be associated with either.

One guy here claimed that it didn't apply to men though, only women, but I did not find his argument entirely convincing.

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Researchers divided 43 men with acne into two groups. The men in one group (high glycemic load) were encouraged to eat plenty of carbohydrates; the men in the other group were told to replace the high glycemic load foods in their diets with other foods that had a lower glycemic load and more protein.

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One recent study said that it looked like the liver reduces the secretion of a testosterone lowering chemical when the liver is turning carbohydrates (mainly fructose) into fats.

The thing is that's not caused by high insulin or glycemic index, but may be associated with either.

One guy here claimed that it didn't apply to men though, only women, but I did not find his argument entirely convincing.

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But it has been shown that foods like meat and dairy products actually release more insulin than some junk food and carb foods. and number 2 the body is extremely efficient at controlling blood sugar levels (which at max can fluctuate up to 32% above normal levels) unlike the way it is at controlling redundant protein levels (has been seen to go up to 900% above)

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I just started the Atkin's diet 4 days ago. Mainly for weight loss but secondarily in hopes of clearing my acne. When I was in high school I did the diet for a whole year and had minimal to no acne at this time even though my hormones were raging. As I've gotten older my skin has been a constant mess and no treatments have helped. I've tried antibiotics, every topical known to man, birth control pills, and many natural treatments. I'm hoping that my Atkins days of no acne were not just a coincidence and that it will help me again. For those that do not know, atkins is extremely low carb and thus very low glycemic index. In the past 4 days I have lost 2 pounds (my Ketostix show I am already in ketosis) and the inflammation of my existing acne has gone down noticably. I still have a ways to go before I will know if it helps.

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