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Low-glycemic diet found to prevent acne.......

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#1 Sparkledust

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 05:48 AM

A diet with a low glycemic load may reduce the occurrence of acne in men, according to a small study conducted by researchers from the RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia and reported in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Researchers divided 43 men with acne into two groups. The men in one group (high glycemic load) were encouraged to eat plenty of carbohydrates; the men in the other group were told to replace the high glycemic load foods in their diets with other foods that had a lower glycemic load and more protein.

Glycemic load refers to the effect that a food has on a person's blood sugar. High glycemic load foods cause blood sugar to spike, while low glycemic load foods cause a more gradual, longer-lasting increase. High glycemic load foods are those high in low-fiber carbohydrates, such as refined sugars and grains. Low glycemic foods include complex carbohydrates high in fiber.

After 12 weeks, the number of acne lesions among men in the low-glycemic load group dropped by approximately 22. Among the men in the high-glycemic load group, the number of acne lesions dropped by approximately 14.

"The results of this study open up the prospect that nutrition-related lifestyle factors may affect the [development] of acne," the researchers wrote.

In addition, levels of the male sex hormone androgen decreased and insulin sensitivity increased more in the low glycemic load group than in the high glycemic load group. Men eating the lower glycemic diet also lost weight.

The researchers said that with the way the study was set up, it was impossible to know what exactly led to the decrease in acne. The weight loss or the improved insulin sensitivity -- or both -- are the most likely, but "these results should be considered preliminary and larger scale studies are needed to confirm the effect of dietary intervention on acne."

#2 medic

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Posted 09 January 2008 - 08:25 PM

Refined sugar is the devil even if it doesn't affect acne.

#3 Nutrition Nut

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Posted 03 February 2008 - 12:26 PM

QUOTE (Sparkledust @ Jan 6 2008, 05:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A diet with a low glycemic load may reduce the occurrence of acne in men, according to a small study conducted by researchers from the RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia and reported in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Researchers divided 43 men with acne into two groups. The men in one group (high glycemic load) were encouraged to eat plenty of carbohydrates; the men in the other group were told to replace the high glycemic load foods in their diets with other foods that had a lower glycemic load and more protein.

Glycemic load refers to the effect that a food has on a person's blood sugar. High glycemic load foods cause blood sugar to spike, while low glycemic load foods cause a more gradual, longer-lasting increase. High glycemic load foods are those high in low-fiber carbohydrates, such as refined sugars and grains. Low glycemic foods include complex carbohydrates high in fiber.

After 12 weeks, the number of acne lesions among men in the low-glycemic load group dropped by approximately 22. Among the men in the high-glycemic load group, the number of acne lesions dropped by approximately 14.

"The results of this study open up the prospect that nutrition-related lifestyle factors may affect the [development] of acne," the researchers wrote.

In addition, levels of the male sex hormone androgen decreased and insulin sensitivity increased more in the low glycemic load group than in the high glycemic load group. Men eating the lower glycemic diet also lost weight.

The researchers said that with the way the study was set up, it was impossible to know what exactly led to the decrease in acne. The weight loss or the improved insulin sensitivity -- or both -- are the most likely, but "these results should be considered preliminary and larger scale studies are needed to confirm the effect of dietary intervention on acne."



What we eat has a profound impact on our health. We spend countless dollars and energy on buying all the "right" products and fine-tuning our skin-care regimens, but yet we fail to do one of the most simplistic things and one that has the most impact on our overall health and that is to engage in lifestyle changes regarding our diet, exercise, and not using tobacco products.

#4 willow569

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Posted 03 February 2008 - 12:38 PM

I think the problem with these diet studies is that they alter the diets so much, and change so many things that it is difficult to tell which of the changes are responsible for the observed effects. The dietary changes they made for these boys is so extremely different on so many levels from the typical teenage boy diet, that its hard to know if it is the low glycemic nature of the diet, or simply the fact that they cut out lots of junk food (which also has acne triggers such as iodized salt). Even the authors point out this limitation of the study towards the end of the article. I would like to see further research that controlled for some of these other confounding factors.

Plus, this study was funded and partly conducted by the meat and poultry industry in Australia - they aren't exactly an unbiased group when it comes to advocating for a high protein diet.




#5 No_MerCy

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Posted 03 February 2008 - 11:20 PM

these studies make no sense logically for numerous reasons which leads me to question even their legitimacy.

number one they are based on the glycemic load which is supposed to somehow judge how fast these studies spike your blood sugar and consequently insulin levels. But it has been shown that foods like meat and dairy products actually release more insulin than some junk food and carb foods. and number 2 the body is extremely efficient at controlling blood sugar levels (which at max can fluctuate up to 32% above normal levels) unlike the way it is at controlling redundant protein levels (has been seen to go up to 900% above)

#6 temp123

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 06:13 PM

One recent study said that it looked like the liver reduces the secretion of a testosterone lowering chemical when the liver is turning carbohydrates (mainly fructose) into fats.

The thing is that's not caused by high insulin or glycemic index, but may be associated with either.

One guy here claimed that it didn't apply to men though, only women, but I did not find his argument entirely convincing.


#7 ~ Dee

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 06:19 PM

QUOTE
Researchers divided 43 men with acne into two groups. The men in one group (high glycemic load) were encouraged to eat plenty of carbohydrates; the men in the other group were told to replace the high glycemic load foods in their diets with other foods that had a lower glycemic load and more protein.


In men, so the medical community is still testing things on guys first..or just on guys? Even abroad? sad.gif That just makes me so depressed...I hope they test this on women as well.

QUOTE
Plus, this study was funded and partly conducted by the meat and poultry industry in Australia - they aren't exactly an unbiased group when it comes to advocating for a high protein diet.


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#8 treefeet

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 11:19 PM

QUOTE (temp123 @ Feb 10 2008, 06:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
One recent study said that it looked like the liver reduces the secretion of a testosterone lowering chemical when the liver is turning carbohydrates (mainly fructose) into fats.

The thing is that's not caused by high insulin or glycemic index, but may be associated with either.

One guy here claimed that it didn't apply to men though, only women, but I did not find his argument entirely convincing.


No, it applies to both men and women. When the liver converts sugars to triglycerides the amount of SHBG it puts out is reduced. SHBG is what binds up testosterone and estradiol, and when there is less of it you get more "free" testosterone that bind with androgen receptors on the sebaceous glands and cause acne. And yes that is influenced by glycemic index, and carbohydrate intake in general.

#9 treefeet

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Posted 22 February 2008 - 01:20 PM

QUOTE (No_MerCy @ Feb 3 2008, 11:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But it has been shown that foods like meat and dairy products actually release more insulin than some junk food and carb foods. and number 2 the body is extremely efficient at controlling blood sugar levels (which at max can fluctuate up to 32% above normal levels) unlike the way it is at controlling redundant protein levels (has been seen to go up to 900% above)


Excuse me, since when do protein and fat create more of an insulin response than carbs? No way, you are out of your mind.

And as for redundant protein levels, I do agree that that can be dangerous, which is why a low card diet has to be high-fat not high-protein.

#10 Heretohelp

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 04:07 AM

I'm only one week into it, but so far it is certainly working.

#11 SweetJade1980

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 08:26 PM

These are the original studies by Dr. Mann


QUOTE
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2004;13(Suppl):S67. Related Articles, Links


The effect of short-term altered macronutrient status on acne vulgaris and biochemical markers of insulin sensitivity.

Smith R, Mann N, Makelainen H, Braue A, Varigos G.

Food Science Department, RMIT University, VIC 3000.

Background - It has been suggested that a low-glycemic index diet may alleviate acne and this hypothesis is currently being investigated in a long-term dietary intervention study. A short-term, live-in study was designed to further investigate this link and to provide information on the short-term effects of altered macronutrient levels.

Objective - To determine the short-term effects of a low-glycemic load diet on markers of insulin sensitivity and how this relates to the clinical progression of acne vulgaris.

Design - Eleven male acne sufferers, aged 15-20, were allocated to either a high protein (HP,n=6, 40-45% energy from carbohydrate, 25% energy from protein) or high carbohydrate group (HC, n=5, 55-60% energy from carbohydrate, 10% energy from protein). Fat intake was maintained at 30-35% energy for each group. All meals were provided on an ad libitum basis for 7 days. Food consumed was measured at baseline and during the live-in study for an overall assessment of an individual's glycemic load. At baseline and day 7, the subject's acne was assessed by a dermatologist and blood was sampled for hormonal markers of acne and HOMA-IR.

Conclusion - The sample size and/or study length was insufficient to observe any significant changes in inflammatory counts or HOMA-IR in either the HP or HC groups. Although some results appear promising, further research is needed to confirm the diet-acne connection.


PMID: 15294556 [PubMed - in process]



QUOTE
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2005;14 Suppl:S43. Related Articles, Links


The effect of a low glycemic load, high protein diet on hormonal markers of acne.

Smith R, Mann N, Braue A, Varigos G.

School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC.

Background - Acne vulgaris is a common endocrine condition affecting adolescents in Western civilizations. Acne typically manifests during puberty when there is a transient decrease in insulin sensitivity. It has been suggested that high glycemic nutrition during puberty induces hyperinsulinemia which increases the bioavailability of androgens and certain growth factors. These changes may induce follicular epithelial growth and increased sebum production - two factors responsible for acne proliferation.

Objective - To determine the effect of a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low glycemic index (GI) foods, on hormonal makers of acne vulgaris.

Design - Male acne sufferers [n=43, age=18.3+/-0.4 (mean +/- SEM)] were randomly assigned to either the dietary intervention (n=23) or control groups (n=20). The intervention diet consisted of 25% energy from protein and 45% energy from low glycemic index carbohydrates. The control group received no information about diet nor were they given dietary instruction. Venous blood was collected at baseline and 12-weeks for an assessment of testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index (FAI), dehydroepiandrosterone - sulfate (DHEA-S), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding proteins -I and -3.

Outcomes - Dietary intervention resulted in a significant reduction in FAI (-9.1 +/- 4.5, P<0.05) and DHEA-S (-0.72 +/- 0.33 umol/L, P<0.05) and an increase in IGFBP-1 (5.3 +/- 1.6 ng/mL, P<0.01). No significant changes were observed in levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3, testosterone or SHBG following dietary intervention. The control group showed no change in any of the blood parameters measured.

Conclusion - These data suggest that a low glycemic load diet may reduce androgenic activity (as indicated by a reduction in FAI and DHEA-S) and may oppose the growth promoting effects of IGF-I by increasing levels of its binding protein, IGFBP-I. This implies that a low glycemic load diet may reduce hormonal influences involved in acne pathogenesis. http://www.ncbi.nlm....l=pubmed_docsum


PMID: 16326495 [PubMed - in process]


QUOTE
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2005;14 Suppl:S97. Related Articles, Links


Low glycemic load, high protein diet lessens facial acne severity.

Smith R, Mann N, Braue A, Varigos G.

School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC.

Background - Acne vulgaris is a multi-factorial skin disorder which affects the 85-100% of the adolescent population in Western civilizations. Despite its high prevalence in the West, acne prevalence is extremely low or rare in non-westernized societies. It has been proposed that refined, high glycemic foods common in Western societies may accentuate underlying causal factors responsible for its proliferation.

Objective - To determine whether a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low GI foods, can alleviate the severity of acne symptoms in young males Design - Male acne sufferers [n=43, age=18.3 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SEM)] were randomly assigned to either the dietary intervention (n=23) or control groups (n=20). The intervention diet consisted of 25% energy from protein and 45% energy from low glycemic index carbohydrates. The control group received no information about diet nor were they given dietary instruction. The efficacy of dietary treatment versus control was clinically assessed by a dermatologist using a modified Cunliffe-Leeds acne scale. The dermatologist assessed facial acne by means of lesion counts and was blinded to the subject's group.

Outcomes - Dietary intervention resulted in a reduction in total lesion counts (-23.1 +/- 4.0 lesions, P <0.001) and inflammatory counts (-16.2 +/- 3.0 lesions, P <0.001). The control group also showed a reduction in total lesion counts (-12.0 +/- 3.5 lesions, P <0.01) and inflammatory counts (-7.4 +/- 2.5 lesions, P <0.05). However, between group analyses showed that the reduction was significantly greater in the intervention group for total counts (P <0.05) and inflammatory counts (P <0.05).

Conclusion - These data indicate that a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low GI foods, significantly decreased the mean number of facial acne lesions, therefore alleviating the severity of acne symptoms. However, the multi-factorial nature of this condition is reflected in the fact that the control group also showed a decrease over time, thereby suggesting that other factors are at play. http://www.ncbi.nlm....l=pubmed_docsum


PMID: 16326597 [PubMed - in process]

#12 maggiemoo1

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Posted 07 April 2011 - 06:28 AM

I just started the Atkin's diet 4 days ago. Mainly for weight loss but secondarily in hopes of clearing my acne. When I was in high school I did the diet for a whole year and had minimal to no acne at this time even though my hormones were raging. As I've gotten older my skin has been a constant mess and no treatments have helped. I've tried antibiotics, every topical known to man, birth control pills, and many natural treatments. I'm hoping that my Atkins days of no acne were not just a coincidence and that it will help me again. For those that do not know, atkins is extremely low carb and thus very low glycemic index. In the past 4 days I have lost 2 pounds (my Ketostix show I am already in ketosis) and the inflammation of my existing acne has gone down noticably. I still have a ways to go before I will know if it helps.