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How long can you safely take antibiotics?


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#1 ppx11

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 04:24 PM

I was on doxycycline for a month during the summer and it really helped my face and body get about 90% clear. My face is still pretty clear but I've been breaking out on my body again. I'm thinking of going back on doxy in hopes of clearing up my body. How long can I stay on doxy? Should I cycle it like take it for a month then come off it for a month or two (which is when I still stay decently clear) and repeat if necessary? Will there be any adverse effects on my face since it's pretty clear? If anything I'm guessing it'll keep me more clear.

#2 sweetheart519

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 11:58 AM

Most of the time, antibiotics are used for 4-6 months to get acne under control. Then maintenance treatment is used after that. You really shouldn't be on them longer than 6 months.

#3 Adam122234

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 03:47 AM

They like to say anything over 6 month is bad for you. I say taking advil and smoking an occasional cigarette is far worse for you. These are antibiotics people, not blood pressure medication. They stop, deform and dysfunction live bacteria in your body. They don't target any unnatural occurrences, like Accutane does with stopping oils from being produced like they should be.


Bactrim is about the ONLY Antibiotic you need to watch out for, other than that...they're pretty safe for year usage...i know people who have been on antibiotics for 5+ years. They're fine. Healthy as horses, with NO health risk or problems from the antibiotics. And NO you WILL NOT become immune to antibiotic treatment if you're on antibiotics for long terms....they have FAR more antibiotics to treat ANY kind of illness you may have. You'll NEVER run out of antibiotics to take. Don't fear them. They're very simple. Most of these stories you hear are scare tactics.

#4 Adam122234

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 03:51 AM

Let's also mention here people...say you do cut your life short by taking antibiotics. Say you die at 95, instead of 100. What's 5 years of your life at that age anyways? Wouldn't you rather enjoy your teen years? Live the part of your life that people would DIE to relive once more? Seriously. Even if you do drop dead and die from them in the VERY VERY VERY long term, don't you think it's worth it? Hell, cut 10 years off my life for all i care. I want to enjoy my days that count. The rest i'll live with other health problems as a Grandpa anyways. Who wants to live those extra years in a wheel chair anyways. The point is, it's very unlikely you'll ever have any problems occur. And even if they do, they're worth it. Your liver failing on you in 2070, when you're 90 is almost irrelevant. Plus, they'll have bionical organs by then, i'm sure.

#5 sweetheart519

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 11:54 AM

There have been many posts on here before explaining why it is not good to take antibiotics long term. Yes, it happens where people are on them for years. But it's not the ideal situation. They do disrupt both good and bad bacteria in your body, which can have bad consequences to your health and immune system. And taking them long term can lead to bacterial resistance and the development of super bugs. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but if you look at the science behind antibiotics and how they work (it's not the same mechanism as tylenol or aspirin) you will see why this is not a good idea.

#6 Adam122234

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 03:32 PM

I'm sorry, but those are minute problems in contrast to the actual benefit you obtain from antibiotics. First off, like said, any kind of super illness due to bacterial resistance, will be overcome with a stronger one. We have almost countless antibiotics...MUCH stronger than the ones we take for our faces. Please don't use this ANYMORE....IT WON'T HAPPEN. Show me one case where a person who took a Tetra-cycline or Bactrim has developed a resistance, where she/he can no longer be treated with ANY form of antibiotics. You won't find one. The one you may find will be a freak case....with almost no relevance. ALL antibiotics work differently, therefore one resistance to one, will not hinder the performance of another. Stop trying to scare people. Opinion is one thing, using them as facts to sway people towards your side is another thing. I say let their doctor decide. Upon that, if you request to stay on them, your doctor WILL LET YOU. Hmmm i wonder why Ole Mr. Doc would allow that....maybe because THEY'RE NOT HARMFUL TO YOU IN THE LEAST.

#7 Smokeyjay

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 12:42 AM

What? There have been several cases of super bugs out there with no antibiotic being effective for them.

The most famous one is MRSA-a skin infection, where even the strongest antibiotics out there are not effective against some strains.

And my doctor doesn't suggest long term antibiotic use as well. I took a strong antibiotic for a week to settle down my acne, and that was as long as I could take it.

Antibiotics target a general characteristic of bacteria, and can also attack the normal flora in the body. Its a good thing to eat some probiotics after an antibiotic course.

And we don't have countless antibiotics. The strongest one out there off the top of my head is vanomycin (sp?), and there are some strains of MRSA resistant to that now. Its a last resort antibiotic.



#8 Smokeyjay

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 12:47 AM

But doxy is a weak antibiotic and I don't see any problem with taking it.

I don't know anything about cycling off and on though. Wouldn't that enable the bacteria to develop a resistance to the drug by going on and off? You need to ask your doctor about that.



#9 Adam122234

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 03:01 AM

IF you get some sort of superbug, it has nothing to do with you taking a Tetra-cycline or Bactrim. C'mon people....these are weak as hell. This has been my point from the start. Normal people, taking low dosages of these to control acne, aren't going to encounter some type of super, antibiotic resistant bacteria. It's just not going to happen.

#10 Tokra

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 09:12 PM

I took antibiotics for 1 1/2 years... my skin was so clear but its only a temp solution, acne will come back full force afterwards.. then my dermatologist said accutane when I begged for another type of antibiotic.