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Kefir & ginger root for stomachs stripped from antibiotics

vitamin vitamins vitamin a calcium ginger probiotic

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#21 Thehoper

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 02:46 PM

That's crazy, they ferment with nothing but water? Interesting. I'd probably add a lemon or ACV to be on the safe side. I wonder how the raw oat yogurt would digest..?

#22 alternativista

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 03:35 PM

How to turn one head of cabbage into 3 pint jars of sauerkraut in 20 days. From the October issue of Martha Stewart Living.

What you need:
Cabbage, coarse sea salt, pint canning jars and lids.

Classic Kraut with Caraway
1 head green cabbage
1 Tablespoon caraway seeds
Coarse seas salt

Shred cabbage reserving a whole leaf to top each jar.
Combine shredded cabbage, caraway and 1 Tablespoon sea salt in a large bowl. Let stand 20 minutes. Massage to release liquid from cabbage about 5 minutes. The liquid forms the brine with the salt.

Pack into 3 pint canning jars, making sure brine covers cabbage by at least 1 inch. Leave 1-2 inches of space at the top. Fold and push 1 reserved leaf into each to fill the empty space. The whole leaves don't need to be submerged.

Close jars tightly and place in a glass or nonreactive baking dish with at least 2 inch high sides. Place in a cool dark spot (65-70F) for 5 days to ferment.

Slowly open and quickly close jars to release built up pressure. Be careful not to let the liquid bubble out. Let stand for 5 more days. Reopen jars to release pressure again.

Let stand another 5 days and reopen, this time tasting to see if it is sour enough for your liking. keep opening every few days to release pressure.

Kraut can be refrigerated if submerged in brine for up to 6 months.

You can also add other veggies like carrot, apple, and fennel. But non cucumber or zuchini as ezymes in them spoil the texture.
-----------------------------------------------
Other sources of instructions

http://www.healingcr...fun/ferfun.html

http://www.cooks.com...-247207,00.html

Kimchi maker
http://store.therawd...saandkimch.html

Sally Fallon's Nourishing traditions has instructions for pickling all kinds of veggies. some recipes might be available free at the Weston Price foundation website.

#23 alternativista

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 04:07 PM

Fermented foods, allergens, lectins, enzymes discussion:
http://www.acne.org/...taking-enzymes/

#24 alternativista

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Posted 20 October 2011 - 02:19 PM

Kimchee -Korean spicy fermented cabbage

Up to 1½ quarts / Kimchi (kim-chee) contains lactobacilli, good bacteria produced by fermentation. You’ll need two or three pint-size jars with screw-on lids (or halve this recipe to make less). Kimchi is best eaten raw to maximize the friendly-bacteria benefits; it’s wonderful on salads, tossed with noodles and vegetables, or stuffed inside an omelet.

Immunity boosters: ProbioticsPosted Image

1 large or 2 medium heads napa cabbage, washed

3 tablespoons coarse sea salt

4 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped

3 tablespoons chopped fresh ginger

1 leek, washed and sliced

2 whole red chile peppers, such as Fresno (remove seeds for less heat)

1 tablespoon low-sodium tamari

1 tablespoon rice vinegar

1.Halve cabbage and remove core. Cut into 1-inch slices and place in a large bowl. Sprinkle with 3 tablespoons sea salt. Use a plate or other weight to press cabbage down for at least 2 hours. Rinse cabbage, being sure to squeeze out excess moisture.

2.In a food processor, blend garlic, ginger, leek, chiles, tamari, and vinegar until finely chopped and mixed (nearly a paste). Thoroughly mix cabbage with garlic mixture and place into clean jars. Pack vegetables tightly into jars to remove air bubbles, pressing down until brine rises. Pour in remaining liquid if needed, leaving at least 1 inch at the top. Cover jars tightly.

3. Allow kimchi to ferment at room temperature for 48 hours, and then transfer to refrigerator, where it will continue to slowly ferment and intensify. Refrigerated, kimchi will last at least a month.

PER SERVING (½ cup): 53 cal, 0g fat (0g mono, 0g poly, 0g sat), 0mg chol, 1g protein, 43g carb, 4g fiber, 400mg sodium

From Delicious Living Magazine

Note: 1 1/2 quarts equals 3 pints as in the above sauerkraut recipe. Which you might want to refer to for extra instructions such as opening the jars every once in a while to release pressure.

-----------------

About the Salt.
Note that the kimchi recipe calls for 3 T of salt. The sauerkraut calls for 1 Tablespoon. Sauerkraut is notoriously high in salt usually, but 1 T of salt for 3 pints that's probably at least 6 servings (and that's for someone who really likes to eat it as something more than a condiment) doesn't sound like too much. But i haven't done the math.

I found this page on fermenting foods and it mentions that the salt isn't necessary, but it's there to inhibit undesired bacteria overgrowth while vs the desired lactobacillus. It mentions adding some whey to jumpstart the lactobacillus. And a purchased vegetable starter culture as an alternative to salt or to much salt. http://paleodietlife...d-food-recipes/

Edited by alternativista, 30 December 2011 - 02:50 PM.


#25 alternativista

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 10:44 AM

Good article on what all various strains of probiotics do for you and the essential symbiotic relationship they have with each other. It really does take all kinds.

http://www.marksdail...ora/#more-25006

See also this chart on the impact of various prebiotics (fiber that feeds the probiotics):
http://huntgatherlov...ecrets-butyrate

Resistant starch and pectin are amongst the most beneficial, FYI all you avoiding tubers, legumes and apples.

Article on alternatives to antibiotics to non life-threatening and/or non-acute conditions, especially for those of us who maintain their immune system with vitamin D, sleep, nutrients, probiotics, etc.
http://www.marksdail...rol/#more-25024

Edited by alternativista, 30 December 2011 - 12:23 PM.


#26 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 12:02 PM

Dairy free people like me can make kimchi. It's a probiotic food as well, AND it contains ginger. Posted Image

Edit-didn't see page two yet. You guys were ahead of me.

Edited by dejaclairevoyant, 30 December 2011 - 12:03 PM.


#27 alternativista

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 02:53 PM

Lacto-fermented salsa

The traditional salsa, lacto-fermented, so it stays good for a very long time and brings a great fuzzy and pungent taste.


Ingredients
  • Posted Image12 cups fresh tomatoes, chopped;
  • 2 cups chilies, seeded and chopped (Jalapeños and Serranos are good choices);
  • 1/4 cup dried oregano;
  • 2 tbsp cumin;
  • 8 garlic cloves, chopped;
  • 2 onions, chopped;
  • 1/4 cup sea salt;
Preparation
  • Wear gloves to handle the chilies and combine the chopped tomatoes, chilies, oregano, cumin, garlic and onions together.
  • Place the tomato mixture little by little in your fermentation jar, pounding it vigorously and sprinkling some of the sea salt as you go.
  • Make sure the mixture fills the jar up to 1 inch bellow the top (because of the expansion), adding more if needed, and that the extracted water covers the vegetables entirely.
  • Press the mixture and keep it under the brine by placing a plate or a lid on top weighted down by a rock or a jug of water. Cover with a clean towel if needed to keep out fruit flies.
  • Place the fermentation jar in a warm spot in your kitchen and allow the salsa to ferment for 3 to 5 days.
  • Check on it from time to time to be sure that the brine covers the mixture and to remove any mold that may form on the surface.
  • A good way to know when it’s ready is to taste it during the fermentation process and move it to the refrigerator when you’re satisfied with the taste.

Lacto-fermented peach chutney

When we think of lacto-fermentation, we often think of vegetables being fermented, but fruits are also a great choice and some very interesting combinations can be prepared this way. Here we use peaches, but feel free to use any of your favorite fruits or those that are in season. Pears, plums and apples are great choices too.


Ingredients
  • Posted Image16 pears, cored and chopped coarsely;
  • 2 cups raisins;
  • 2 cups pecans, chopped;
  • 2 1/2 tbsp sea salt;
  • Juice of 5 lemons;
  • 4 onions, finely chopped;
  • 4 tbsp grated fresh ginger;
  • 4 hot peppers, fresh or dried, chopped;
Preparation
  • Combine the chopped pears with the raisins, pecans, sea salt, lemon juice, onions, ginger and hot peppers together.
  • Place the mixture little by little in your fermentation jar, pounding it vigorously to release the juices.
  • Make sure the mixture fills the jar up to 1 inch bellow the top (because of the expansion) and that the extracted water covers the mixture. If not, create a brine of 2 tablespoons sea salt to 4 cups water and add it to the mixture.
  • Press the vegetables and keep them under the brine by placing a plate or a lid on top weighted down by a rock or a jug of water. Cover with a clean towel if needed to keep out fruit flies.
  • Place the fermentation jar in a warm spot in your kitchen and allow the chutney to ferment for 2 to 4 days.
  • Check on it from time to time to be sure that the brine covers the vegetables and to remove any mold that may form on the surface.
  • A good way to know when it’s ready is to taste it during the fermentation process and move it to the refrigerator when you’re satisfied with the taste.



Posted Image


Lacto-fermented vegetable medley

Vegetable combinations are a great idea when lacto-fermenting and this summer vegetable medley of cucumbers, carrots, apples and cauliflower is a great example.


Ingredients
  • Posted Image4 apples, cored and diced;
  • 4 cups cauliflower florets;
  • 4 carrots, peeled and diced;
  • 8 green onions, sliced thinly;
  • 3 tbsp grated fresh ginger;
  • 8 tbsp sea salt;
Preparation
  • Combine the apples, cauliflower, carrots, onions and ginger together.
  • Place the mixture little by little in your fermentation jar, pounding them vigorously and sprinkling some of the sea salt as you go.
  • Make sure the mixture fills the jar up to 1 inch bellow the top (because of the expansion), adding more if needed, and that the extracted water covers the vegetables entirely. If not, create a brine of 2 tablespoons sea salt to 4 cups water and add it to the cabbage.
  • Press the mixture and keep it under the brine by placing a plate or a lid on top weighted down by a rock or a jug of water. Cover with a clean towel if needed to keep out fruit flies.
  • Place the fermentation jar in a warm spot in your kitchen and allow the mixture to ferment for 3 to 5 days.
  • Check on it from time to time to be sure that the brine covers the mixture and to remove any mold that may form on the surface.
  • A good way to know when it’s ready is to taste it during the fermentation process. It’s ready when you’re satisfied with the taste.

Beet Kvass

Beet Kvass is a lacto-fermented beet juice loaded with nutrients that is very useful as a digestive tonic. The beets used in this recipe can of course be enjoyed as well, but the resulting liquid is the main attraction here and can be used instead of vinegar in salad dressings.


Ingredients
  • Posted Image4 large or 6 medium beetroot, peeled and chopped roughly;
  • 5 tbsp sea salt;
Preparation
  • Combine the sea salt and the chopped beets and place the mixture in your fermentation jar.
  • Add enough water to fill the jar, stir to dissolve the salt, cover and let ferment in a warm spot of your kitchen for about 2 days before removing it to the refrigerator.


#28 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 12:46 PM

Oh--for those on gluten/grain free diets, use apple cider vinegar instead of rice vinegar, and skip the tamari. :)

#29 tim12

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 05:18 PM

Having my first batch of beet kvass tomorrow, exciting! It's a really nice looking drink too.

#30 dejaclairevoyant

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 12:47 PM

I'm becoming obsessed with fermenting, lol

#31 alternativista

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 04:19 PM

I have Sally Fallon's book and know it has recipes for fermenting other veggies and such. One of these days, I'll post some.

#32 alternativista

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 01:40 PM

I had an article that named some strains that specifically reduced allergic response, but lost it. Lactobacillus reuteri seems to be one. Here are some other articles/studies.

Allergic reactions inhibited by probiotics.
http://content.karger.com/produktedb/produkte.asp?typ=fulltext&file=000098318

http://www.umcutrecht.nl/research/specials/allergies-in-children/

Oral Treatment with Live Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibits
the Allergic Airway Response in Mice
http://ajrccm.atsjou.../6/561.full.pdf

Article on fermentation and probiotics in several products, but predominately about dairy. They are talking about commercial products: http://www.ajcn.org/.../73/2/374S.long

#33 alternativista

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:19 AM

Latin american Sauerkraut aka Cortido

If you've ever had Salvadoran or Honduran Pupusas, this is the slaw they serve them with. See below for how to use your pineapple skin and core to make pineapple vinegar to make it the traditional way. Also, look for Mexican oregano. I don't know what the difference is, but it is different. It tastes 'Latino.'

1 large cabbage, cored and shredded
1 cup carrots, grated
2 medium onions quartered and finely sliced
1 T dried oregano
1/2 - 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
1 T sea salt
4 T whey (or 1T additional salt)

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Pound with a wooden pounder or meat hammer, (maybe a potato masher?) for about 10 minutes to release juices. Divide among mason canning jars and press down until juices rise over the top of the cabbage mixture. There should be 1" of space at the top of the jars. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.

Variation: Real Cortido made with Pineapple vinegar in place of the salt and whey.

Pineapple Vinegar

skin and core from 1 pineapple
2 quarts water
2 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp red chile flakes
2 T whey (optional)

Place all ingredients in a bowl and leave at room temperature for about 36 hours. strain vinegar into clean jars and cover tightly. Store in a cool place for several months.

Ginger Carrots

4 cups grated carrots
1 T freshly grated ginger
1 T sea salt
4 T whey (or another T of salt)

Sweet carrots counter the acidity. and go well with ginger.

Mix all ingredients and pound with a mallet or something to release juices. Place in canning jars, pressing down so juices cover the carrots. Leave 1" of space at the top of the jars. cover tightly and leave at room temperature for 3 days. Refrigerate.

You can make a Japanese Sauerkraut variation using a head of Napa cabbage, green onions, 2 T naturally fermented soy sauce, 2 T lemon juice, 1T sea salt, Whey or another T of salt.

#34 alternativista

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 08:36 AM

Some sites on fermented dairy

Clabbermouth - new blog on fermenting unpasteurized dairy: http://www.clabbermo...a-clabbermouth/

Discussion forum with recipes on a site supporting a book called 'Keeping the Family Cow" http://familycow.pro...s.com/index.cgi
Post on someone's experience making Queso Fresco http://familycow.pro...ay&thread=50946

List of bacteria cultures involved in various cheeses and other products. I'm not sure this applies to the products found in the average American supermarket though:
http://benm.myweb.uga.edu/

#35 alternativista

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 06:16 PM

Blog post on fermented foods: http://healthfoodlov...-helen-padarin/ with recipes and sources.

#36 FaceValues

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 11:12 PM

How do you feel about raw dairy/cultured raw butter, alternativista?

#37 alternativista

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 09:22 AM

http://healthfoodlov...ple-sauerkraut/[/b]

Spicy Pink & Purple Sauerkraut



Ingredients:
  • 1 whole purple cabbage
  • 1 big beetroot or 2 small beetroot
  • 3 or 4 tsp. Himalayan sea salt, finely ground
  • 3 tsp. caraway seeds
  • 2 cloves of garlic, chopped finely
  • optional: 1 small chili, chopped finely

Your Tools & Equipment:
  • a mandolin (useful but not necessary)
  • a sharp knife
  • a chopping board
  • a potato peeler
  • a crock pot/bucket
  • a mortar & pestle (to grind salt & pound cabbage)
  • a ziplock bag
  • a tea towel

see link for instructions and pictures. It had more than allowed in a post so I couldn't just copy and paste it.

#38 alternativista

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 02:31 PM

Lacto-fermented Hummus (Garbanzo Bean Dip)
http://www.cookinggo...banzo-bean-dip/

3 cups cooked, drained, garbanzo beans (see *note* below)
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 cloves garlic, peeled
2 teaspoons unrefined sea salt
1/4 cup whey (see how to obtain whey)
1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground cumin, to taste
1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne, or to taste
2 to 4 Tablespoons filtered water, or more as needed
You Will Also Need:
1-quart sized wide-mouth jar (preferably with air-lock lid)
*NOTE* For best nutrition – soak dried garbanzo beans 12 hours (or more) in filtered water to cover, along with a few Tablespoons of whey. View more research on the importance of soaking beans from Amanda Rose Ph.D. @ Rebuild from Depression.
After soaking, drain the beans and cook as you would normally. (I like to cover the “soaked” beans with filtered water and cook in the crock pot on low all day – about 6 to 8 hours.)
In the bowl of a food processor, add the garlic and pulse to mince. Add in the beans, lemon juice, sea salt, whey, cumin, and cayenne. Process until a paste forms.
Add in filtered water, a little at a time, until desired consistency is reached.
Transfer bean mixture to a 1-quart wide mouth jar. Place lid (preferably air-lock lid) on the jar tightly. If using air-lock fill with water according to instructions. Allow to ferment at room temperature for 3 days.
Remove air-lock lid, if using, and replace with storage lid — transfer to cold storage.
Serve at room temperature. For a nice presentation, drizzle dip in serving bowl with olive oil and/or sesame oil. (A light dusting of paprika on top also makes a lovely addition.) Serve with fresh veggies and/or pita chips
Makes 1-Quart.

Edited by alternativista, 10 May 2012 - 02:31 PM.


#39 alternativista

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 07:43 AM

I just learned that you can freeze yogurt to use as a starter for your next batch. So I put some in the freezer a week ago. I'm going to test it soon.

#40 alternativista

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 01:47 PM

Mercola article on the importance of gut microflora in prevention of all kinds of diseases. http://articles.merc...01_DNL_artNew_1

Specifically names a few strains and what they do for you:

Bifidobacterium lactis

resulted in increases in both the number and disease-fighting capacity of white cells.


Lactobaccilus reuteri can help protect against foodborne infection

5

.


However, just because a study has not been done with a particular strain does not mean it is not effective. These studies need to be paid for and most are not done unless there is a potential to commercialize a strain.

Like the L. Casie Immunitas advertised by DAnno or Yoplait or whoever. You can get L Casei from many other sources. L Casei Immunitas is nothing but a name they copyrighted and gave to the L Casei they produce in their factories.




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