Jump to content

Photo

Kefir & ginger root for stomachs stripped from antibiotics

vitamin vitamins vitamin a calcium ginger probiotic

44 replies to this topic

#1 ~ Dee

~ Dee

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,251
    Likes: 0
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:greener pastures
  • Joined: 21-January 07

Posted 25 June 2007 - 10:55 PM

I just wanted to drop a tip to everyone out there. I know probiotics have been discussed in this forum before.. But, I gotta say... Kefir is a wonderful & tasty probiotic yogurt drink that helps replenish the good bacteria in the digestive tract.
http://www.kefir.net/benefits.htm

Another wonderful thing I use to help with indigestion/heartburn that's also good for your body is crystalized ginger. It can neutralize stomach acid, lessen nausea, and has vitamin a, vitamin c, calcium, and iron in it as well. I suppose you could take it in pill form, or just eat the root, but I honestly love the candy.

I'm not trying to step on the toes of those who've sworn off dairy, I understand. Or the toes of anyone who can't stand the taste of ginger root. Or for whom the idea of something coated with processed sugar is a big NO.

I really just wanted to share what made my stomach feel better this week than a whole bottle of Zantac could accomplish. wink.gif

#2 NdnRomeo

NdnRomeo

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 4,375
    Likes: 6
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Houston
  • Joined: 11-July 06

Posted 25 June 2007 - 11:14 PM

What are good yogurt recipes? I can't eat yogurt plain, what can I put inside it to give it flavor? I know this doesn't relate to kefir, but it's close =)

And does sour cream also have any good bacteria in it?

#3 ~ Dee

~ Dee

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,251
    Likes: 0
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:greener pastures
  • Joined: 21-January 07

Posted 26 June 2007 - 12:13 AM

I honestly don't know about the sour cream.... Here's wikipedia's page on sour cream.. http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Sour_cream

Kefir's info on lactose intolerance:
QUOTE
For the lactose intolerant, kefir's abundance of beneficial yeast and bacteria provide lactase, an enzyme which consumes most of the lactose left after the culturing process.


I sometimes put granola or trail mix in yogurt, fruit or preserves are tasty in it as well. biggrin.gif
Kefir is sweetened with cane juice or you can get it unsweetened, but it's drinkable. It also has more good bacteria in it than just lactobacillus acidophilus.

Kefir:
QUOTE
http://www.kefir.net/nutrit.htm
In addition to beneficial bacteria and yeast, kefir contains minerals and essential amino acids that help the body with healing and maintenance functions. The complete proteins in kefir are partially digested and therefore more easily utilized by the body. Tryptophan, one of the essential amino acids abundant in kefir, is well known for its relaxing effect on the nervous system. Because kefir also offers an abundance of calcium and magnesium, which are also important minerals for a healthy nervous system, kefir in the diet can have a particularly profound calming effect on the nerves.

Kefir's ample supply of phosphorus, the second most abundant mineral in our bodies, helps utilize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for cell growth, maintenance and energy.

Kefir is rich in Vitamin B12, B1, and Vitamin K. It is an excellent source of biotin, a B Vitamin which aids the body's assimilation of other B Vitamins, such as folic acid, pantothenic acid, and B12. The numerous benefits of maintaining adequate B vitamin intake range from regulation of the kidneys, liver and nervous system to helping relieve skin disorders, boost energy and promote longevity.


QUOTE
http://www.kefir.net/kefiryogurt.htm

Both kefir and yogurt are cultured milk products...
...but they contain different types of beneficial bacteria. Yogurt contains transient beneficial bacteria that keep the digestive system clean and provide food for the friendly bacteria that reside there. But kefir can actually colonize the intestinal tract, a feat that yogurt cannot match.

Kefir contains several major strains of friendly bacteria not commonly found in yogurt, Lactobacillus Caucasus, Leuconostoc, Acetobacter species, and Streptococcus species.

It also contains beneficial yeasts, such as Saccharomyces kefir and Torula kefir, which dominate, control and eliminate destructive pathogenic yeasts in the body. They do so by penetrating the mucosal lining where unhealthy yeast and bacteria reside, forming a virtual SWAT team that housecleans and strengthens the intestines. Hence, the body becomes more efficient in resisting such pathogens as E. coli and intestinal parasites.

Kefir's active yeast and bacteria provide more nutritive value than yogurt by helping digest the foods that you eat and by keeping the colon environment clean and healthy.

Because the curd size of kefir is smaller than yogurt, it is also easier to digest, which makes it a particularly excellent, nutritious food for babies, invalids and the elderly, as well as a remedy for digestive disorders.


This page has a couple kefir recipes on it:
http://www.kefir.net/recipes.htm

#4 Wynne

Wynne

    Look into kitty's eyes....you're feeling polite and kind

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 16,939
    Likes: 119
About Me
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:127.0.0.1
  • Joined: 15-April 07

Posted 26 June 2007 - 12:31 AM

Fresh ginger root added to tea is simply delicious as well.

#5 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 26 June 2007 - 08:22 AM

I don't think it's quite correct to say that kefir can colonize the intestines, but yogurt can't. It's more that the strains used in most commercial yogurt can't. They don't survive. But I make it using a probiotic capsule that contains the better strains and organic milk. Making yogurt is much easier than kefir. And making either is cheaper than buying it. I buy a half gallon of organic milk for under $3 and make one quart of yogurt and either drink the rest or make more yogurt.

BTW, it's Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium Breve that will protect you from e. coli.

http://www.acne.org/...p...5&hl=yogurt

#6 ~ Dee

~ Dee

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,251
    Likes: 0
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:greener pastures
  • Joined: 21-January 07

Posted 26 June 2007 - 01:34 PM

QUOTE
I don't think it's quite correct to say that kefir can colonize the intestines, but yogurt can't.


Who said it can't? I know it wasn't me...You must be talking about this:
QUOTE
But kefir can actually colonize the intestinal tract, a feat that yogurt cannot match.

You could write the Kefir company and complain to them about that. Maybe they'll change their wording.

QUOTE
Making yogurt is much easier than kefir. And making either is cheaper than buying it. I buy a half gallon of organic milk for under $3 and make one quart of yogurt and either drink the rest or make more yogurt.


Can you tell us how you make your own yogurt? It'd be good to know.

#7 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 26 June 2007 - 02:07 PM

QUOTE (~Dee~ @ Jun 26 2007, 02:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
I don't think it's quite correct to say that kefir can colonize the intestines, but yogurt can't.


Who said it can't? I know it wasn't me...You must be talking about this:
QUOTE
But kefir can actually colonize the intestinal tract, a feat that yogurt cannot match.

You could write the Kefir company and complain to them about that. Maybe they'll change their wording.

QUOTE
Making yogurt is much easier than kefir. And making either is cheaper than buying it. I buy a half gallon of organic milk for under $3 and make one quart of yogurt and either drink the rest or make more yogurt.


Can you tell us how you make your own yogurt? It'd be good to know.


yeah, the Kefir sites always say that.

Yogurt making is extremely easy. I make it in an old quart canning jar. I just put in several tablespoons of yogurt with live cultures and/or the probiotic capsule. You can use the last quarter cup or so of your last batch. Then fill with organic milk. I use 1 or 2%. Then you just put it some place warm overnight. I wrap it in a heating pad on medium. If you have an oven with a pilot light or an oven light bulb, that should work. I used to do it in an oven with a pilot light or in summer, set it in my garage over night. It needs to be 80 - 90 or so degrees. If it hasn't thickened by then, you can leave it longer. Some say it should ferment for 24 hours, I think to really get the lactose broken down.

Most instructions will tell you to cook the milk to a certain temperature first to kill any organisms that might prevent the yogurt strains from growing, but you don't have to do that with pasteurized milk. Especially organic milk, which is usually a lot fresher than the bigger, cheaper commercial brands.

I used to always use danon yogurt for a starter, and that made a thin, smooth yogurt similar to kefir. Since I added the probiotic capsule, it makes a thick gelatin, which breaks up into lumps when you stir, so it's not as pretty if you just wanted to stir in some juice or something. I also experimented with some greek yogurt to see if I used it as a starter, I'd get the same thick ricotta like consistency. It was close, but it spoiled fast for some reason. Also, that's one of the strains that doesn't survive the digestion process.

The Food Network show Good Eats, did an episode on yogurt. That's the one where he analyzes ingredients and methods telling you what variations produce what results. Unfortunately I can't find the info on their website. So all I remember is that he used a heating pad and preferred 2% milk.

With Kefir, you have to buy these grains that contain the live culture. You then ferment it the same way as with yogurt, but then you have to strain it to recover the grains and save them for the next batch. I bought some grains from whole foods and tried it, but it didn't 'kefir.' So it must be more sensitive to temperature or maybe bacteria in the milk which I didn't cook first interfered with it. Or the grains I bought were already dead.

#8 ~ Dee

~ Dee

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,251
    Likes: 0
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:greener pastures
  • Joined: 21-January 07

Posted 26 June 2007 - 03:04 PM

Thanks for sharing! cool.gif

QUOTE
I just put in several tablespoons of yogurt with live cultures and/or the probiotic capsule.


You said you had used dannon for a starter..Which yogurt are you currently using? Also, I'd like advice on which probiotic capsules would be good to use.
I do have a heating pad, so I would probably use that method.

I currently buy my Kefir premade in bottles at our local supermarket, but I really do like the idea of doing it myself. Then I can control what it's sweetened with should I decide to.

#9 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 26 June 2007 - 04:17 PM

QUOTE (~Dee~ @ Jun 26 2007, 04:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for sharing! cool.gif

QUOTE
I just put in several tablespoons of yogurt with live cultures and/or the probiotic capsule.


You said you had used dannon for a starter..Which yogurt are you currently using? Also, I'd like advice on which probiotic capsules would be good to use.
I do have a heating pad, so I would probably use that method.

I currently buy my Kefir premade in bottles at our local supermarket, but I really do like the idea of doing it myself. Then I can control what it's sweetened with should I decide to.


I use the last from the prior batch which I've been keeping going since before Christmas. The probiotic I have is Nature's Way Primadophilus Bifidus. It has Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Acidopholus. I added it to the the last of the prior batch made with the Dannon as a starter. But I also made a small amount with just the probiotic as the starter to make sure it worked, and it did.

The b. breve and L rhamnosus are supposed to help protect you from E. Coli. And the L. Rhamnosus is supposed to be the most beneficial for Candida.

I'm thinking of looking for some L casei to add. If nothing else, I'll get that Dannon product they keep advertising on TV with their L. Casei Immuntas. Activa?

Edit: I want to add that the only reason I used Dannon was it was all I usually found in the small pint containers. The others, with more strains of probiotics were usually only available in quart containers. There's no point spending $4-5 on a whole quart when what you want to do is make your own. But since, my stores have started carrying more brands with more strains in smaller containers. And if you keep your culture going, you can use your own yogurt for the next batch.

#10 ~ Dee

~ Dee

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 1,251
    Likes: 0
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:greener pastures
  • Joined: 21-January 07

Posted 26 June 2007 - 05:19 PM

Thank you very much.
You seem to have a wealth of knowledge. It is wonderful getting you to expound upon it.

#11 AutonomousOne1980

AutonomousOne1980

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 3,076
    Likes: 51
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:milwaukee, WI
  • Joined: 30-June 06

Posted 26 June 2007 - 07:54 PM

fiber will also feed the good bacteria and help them grow.

#12 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 27 June 2007 - 09:08 AM

QUOTE(AutonomousOne1980 @ Jun 26 2007, 08:54 PM) View Post
fiber will also feed the good bacteria and help them grow.


This is true.

#13 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 22 July 2008 - 11:16 AM

You can also make something very similar to creme fraiche or Crema to Latin Americans using purchased buttermilk for a starter. This is similar to sour cream, just with a milder flavor and it usually has a thinner consistency (at least crema is thinner, I've never had creme fraiche). I have no idea what benefit the live cultures have, but presumably they at least consume some of the lactose. And it tastes good and you can make it with organic and/or raw milk.

It can be used in place of cream sauces made with flour and cream that involves dirtying yet another sauce pan. Have with fruit, frijoles, etc.

You just buy commercial buttermilk, which isn't really buttermilk but a fermented product. I looked for a while for organic and/or something that said it had live cultures but never found any so I just used a supermarket brand. Just use a few tablespoons in milk and ferment just like yogurt. Then you can use a spoonful or so of your crema for the next batch. You are supposed to use cream, but I used whole milk.

Another thing you can do with yogurt is drain the whey from it so it thickens and use it like a cheese spread. Stir in some herbs, sun dried tomato, etc. In my prior post I mentioned adding a probiotic capsule to my yogurt and it makes it thicker and tangier which should make it even 'cheesier.'

#14 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 23 February 2009 - 02:15 PM

Different probiotic strains help different conditions. Some were mentioned above. This article names some others. http://realage.typep...s-its-good.html

And here:
http://www.acne.org/...p...t&p=1903649

QUOTE
Different strains can have different benefits, but apparently not all can survive the stomach acids and make it to your intestines. So it's complicated and I've just started looking into it.


I've read that it's the Bifidobacterium strains, also known as bifidus, that protects you from e.coli. But when I tried to find more info, I find studies of Lactobacillus strains and e.coli, specifically Lactobacillus rhamnosus. But if you read further, it says that Bifidobacterium Breve can 'inhibit the consequences of e. coli.
http://iai.asm.org/c.../full/73/8/5183

So apparently you need them all. Or at least a variety.

Here's a list I've found of commonly used strains that are used in probiotics:
Lactobacillus casei Shirota (or LCS), from Yakult and used in the product of the same name.
Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG, used in over 25 countries. Strain owner is Valio from Finland . Lactobacillus acidophilus LA7, in many dairy products
Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5, in dairy products and food supplements
Lactobacillus acidophilus DDS, mainly in food supplements
Bifidobacterium lactis, BB12, in dairy products
Bifidobacterium longum BB536, in dairy products and supplements
Lactobacillus casei LC1, used in products from Nestlé
Bifidobacterium animalis DN-173 010 (Bifidus Essentis), used in products by Danone

This site says that the one's used to make greek and bulgarian yogurt don't survive. There seems to be a battle about this between yogurt people and probiotic manufacturers, though, with the pro yogurt crowd claiming that studies of yogurt eating people show benefits from yogurt that probiotics in capsule form don't show.
http://www.pdrhealth.com/drug_info/nmdrugp.../pro_0034.shtml


Know Your Probiotics: Benefits of Lactobacillus Plantarum:
http://www.insidersh..._plantarum/3887

QUOTE
It can provide treatment for irritable bowel syndrome, decrease Crohn’s disease symptoms, help heal colitis and act as one of the best probiotics for aiding your intestines with digestion.


Lactobacillus Plantarum has an uncanny ability to quickly digest protein and liquefy gelatin, making it very beneficial in not only treating, but also preventing food allergies. It also performs the functions of regulating immunity and stomach inflammation. Of even more importance to the human body is its ability to absorb and maintain important nutrients such as omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins and anti-oxidants, making it vital for fighting infection and taking control over the “bad” bacteria.

In many cases where patients are taking antibiotics for an infection they develop a yeast infection, which contributes to good bacteria becoming destroyed. This is not the case with there is an adequate amount of Lactobacillus Plantarum in the body. They manage to continue to do their job while allowing the antibiotic to do its work as well.


Know Your Probiotics: The Benefits of Bifidobacterium Bifidum:
http://www.insidersh...um_bifidum/3888
http://www.insidersh...um_bifidum/3888

QUOTE
build up the immune system, lower the cholesterol levels, lessens the chance of allergies, aid in digestion and helps to prevent the effects of tumors in colon cancer. Bifidobacteria has also been very effective as a remedy for vaginitis, diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, yeast infections and more.

Edited by alternativista, 30 December 2011 - 12:25 PM.


#15 Aghaigh Dearg

Aghaigh Dearg

    also answers to AggaDagga and Ike Derog

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 819
    Likes: 1
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Ireland
  • Joined: 23-October 06

Posted 23 February 2009 - 06:20 PM

QUOTE (Wynne @ Jun 26 2007, 06:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Fresh ginger root added to tea is simply delicious as well.


I dunno if I agree the delicious part but ginger tea definitely helps me with an upset tummy! Swear by it, even though I dont enjoy it!

#16 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 20 March 2009 - 12:41 PM

There are other fermented foods you can try as well:

http://www.acne.org/...IC-t205113.html

 

http://www.healingcr...fun/ferfun.html

http://www.cooks.com...-247207,00.html

Also, sour dough or some other fermentation methods can make grains digestible even to celiacs.
http://www.acne.org/...-c-t200362.html


Edited by alternativista, 18 April 2013 - 10:11 AM.


#17 Brenton B

Brenton B

    Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 208
    Gallery Images: 2
    Likes: 2
About Me
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Diego, CA
  • Joined: 10-October 06

Posted 20 March 2009 - 01:02 PM

i've been using kefir for about two months now, and I definitely notice it's benefits on my digestion being as it i've been lactose and gluten intolerant for nearly seven years. before, i couldn't stomach eating any dairy because i'd have horribly negative digestive reactions. after using kefir for a few weeks, i was able to occasionally have ice cream without any issues whatsoever.

i make kefir shakes for my breakfast everday. i strain the kefir into the blender, add a cup of blueberries or strawberries, a teaspoon of cinnamon, some freshly ground ginger (or powdered ginger if i'm in a rush), and Total EFA 3-6-9 oil.

i tried drinking kefir after straining it without adding anything to it for flavor, and it wasn't the best tasting cup of goat's milk. adding some berries, cinnamon, and ginger to it is almost a necessity for anyone who doesn't enjoy slightly bitter drinks.

for anyone interested in making their own kefir, check out *Moderator edit, URL removed - read the board rules. *. it helped me quite a bit when my kefir grains weren't producing drinkable kefir for the first two weeks I was trying to make it. also, there are a lot of really good ideas and recipes for making cheese, ice cream, dips, and spreads using kefir.

#18 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 16 November 2010 - 03:11 PM

Bifidobacterium lactis can prevent damage to intestines from wheat:

http://www.insidersh...ium_lactis/3890 http://www.celiac.co...adin/Page1.html

Another fermented food thread:
http://www.acne.org/...IC-t205113.html


#19 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 17 November 2010 - 03:51 PM

^I was just at Whole foods looking at what strains were in all the yogurts and I looked at a bottle of lifeway kefir and it had bifidobacterium lactis. Apparently it's their new gimic. It said something about their new Proboost with b.lactis and something else added specifically for digestive health. I noticed that their kefir starter did not contain b. lactis.

Also, I noticed Primal Defense ultra probiotics contain it. It's expensive, but if you are experiencing digestion problems and allergies, it's worth it.

These are the strains in Green valley organics yogurt and what they claim they do. Their yogurt containers say they have 10 strains, but didn't say which. I was hoping one might be b. lactis.

QUOTE
1. Lactobacillus bulgaricus is always used in yogurt production. It helps to give yogurt its tart flavor and is helpful to sufferers of lactose intolerance.

2. Lactobacillus acidophilus is known to increase intestinal flora, so this probiotic is often recommended to those who have been taking antibiotics, which kill beneficial intestinal bacteria. It can also be helpful in reducing constipation, yeast infections and strengthening the immune system.

3. Lactobacillus paracasei assists in the growth of desirable bacteria in the body. It is also believed to aid in digestion as it reduces constipation and the effects of lactose intolerance. (the same thing as danon or whoever's L casei immunitas which is a copyrighted name.)

4. Lactoabacillus rhamnosus inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria (like e coli) in the intestine. It is used as a natural preservative in yogurt and has been found to balance the digestive tract and reduce incidences of diarrhea. It has even been associated with a reduction of respiratory tract infections in children.

5. & 6. Lactococcus lactis and Lactococcus diacetylactis aid in synthesis of folate and riboflavin – two important B vitamins – during digestion.

7. Streptococcus thermophilus alleviates symptoms of lactose intolerance and other intestinal disorders. It is also believed to improve health and support longevity.

8. Lactococcus cremoris, a bacterial starter culture, produces lactic and acetic acid, two aromatic agents of kefir. This culture adds to the characteristic flavor of yogurt and kefir.

9. Leuconostoc, with its ability to produce lactic acid and diacetyl, helps to ferment dairy products.

10. Bifdobacterium bifidum creates healthy natural intestinal flora, which aids in the synthesis of B vitamins. While it aids in digestion, it also helps prevent digestive disorders like constipation, gas, and food allergies.


bifidobacterium lactis strains may prevent intestinal hyperpermeability study. Article: http://www.celiac.co...adin/Page1.html You can take mega doses periodically or take supplements or eat fermented live cultured foods daily.

Edited by alternativista, 22 July 2011 - 01:26 PM.


#20 alternativista

alternativista

    Senior Member

  • Veteran Members
  • Posts & Likes
    Posts: 11,456
    Likes: 1,064
About Me
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Joined: 13-February 07

Posted 22 July 2011 - 01:21 PM

Oat yogurt:

Detailed article: http://vegpeace.org/oatyogurt.html

You can ferment raw or cooked oats and other grains.

QUOTE
For the best flavor and nutrition, start with unprocessed raw whole oat groats.

Put the oat groats in a ceramic or glass bowl or jar. Add some water, enough to get them moist, with a little extra water covering them. After a few hours, or overnight, put the soaked oats and the soaking water in a blender or food processor or mortar and pestle. Blend until smooth. Pour back into bowl.
Oat Yogurt from Whole Oat Groats

Put dry whole oat groats through a grain mill or food processor. Either grind them into flour, or roll them into flakes, depending on the capabilities of your machine. Or put the oats in a blender, and grind them to oat flour. Or use rolled oats or steel-cut oats from the bulk bins at a store. Put the flour or flakes or whatever in a bowl with water.
‚€¶Next, Let the Oats Ferment

Use a ceramic bowl, since healthy fermentation produces acids that could interact with a metal container. You can cover the bowl with a plate or a cloth to keep out dust, and to keep the oats from drying. If you use a plate, it doesn't need to be a tight fit, in fact it's better to let some air in, and to let carbon dioxide out. Leave the oats in a warm sunny place, on your kitchen counter or windowsill. If you have a gas stove with a pilot light, you can leave them on top of that.

Stir them once in a while. If they have absorbed all the water, add a little. There should be a little water on top, or around the edges. After a few days, taste them to see if they're sour yet. Then taste them once a day. When they are as sour as you want, either use the yogurt, or put it into the refrigerator if you don't want them to get more sour.
You Don't Need to Buy a Special Starter Culture

Friendly micro-organisms called Lactobacilli are everywhere. They're related to the friendly bacteria that naturally live in your colon, and the ones in dairy yogurt. They like starch and fiber, and will reproduce happily if you give them a culture medium of water, starch and fiber. The kind of bacteria that grow is dependent on what food you provide them. Micro-organisms produce substances that help them and suppress their rivals, so the good lactobacilli produce acids that suppress fungi, yeasts, bad bacteria, etc.

Oat Yogurt or Oat Sour Cream

Oats are creamy, because of their high fat content, so the result comes out resembling dairy yogurt or sour cream. If you make it thicker, and let it get more sour, it will be more like sour cream.

Save Some Starter for Next Time in a ceramic bowl with a plate on top, or a jar with a cloth on top held on by a rubber band. Put it in the refrigerator until you're ready to use it.



Guide to making Kefir http://www.acne.org/...de-t303418.html

Edited by alternativista, 08 September 2011 - 01:36 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users