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#3621 chuckstonchew

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 03:35 PM

wowowowowow the time its go

the years go by, we age, our lives are going to hell, we find no solution to the problem of skin fucking ... best to avoid further suffering is fuck up dying of an illness or accident ... leaving behind people who want ...


Yikes. Overwhelming pessimism...
As we've stated numerous times - the hydrogel is very promising. It's only a matter of time before some sort of funding comes through.
And if the hydrogel for some reason does not work, I assure you something will in the near future. We are rapidly approaching a technological and medical revolution.

I think it was Vladislav who made some posts not too long ago regarding the future of medical technologies including genetics, nanotechnology and regenerative medicine. Up until very recently, medicine has been based on a 'guess and check' style approach. However, our new understanding of human biology and genetics means this is no longer the case. We can now understand on a molecular level why our bodies act the way they do. Thus, we will be able to cure (not treat) virtually any ailment that affects the human body cell-by-cell. Nanotechnology in particular will have the ability to restore/repair (or even augment) individual cells or DNA easily. Furthermore, now that the body is understood as an information technology, medicine is subject to Moore's Law - which means exponential growth - we're talking double the growth every year. It doesn't seem like much is happening now but soon it's going to EXPLODE!

In short - have patience. Skin problems will be a thing of the past in your life time. I know it sucks in the present but there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Do some research on the ideas of people like Robert Freitas and Ray Kurzweil. They'll surely raise your spirits in anticipation of what's to come! And in the meantime, count your blessings! And also give this hydrogel a chance and help us spread the word if/when we start a movement to gain funds. It's shown very real results and could be available for us to use very, very soon!

#3622 seabs135

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 06:35 PM

BTW there are much worse things than scars,

@Vlad suffering is suffering, it is subjective and you cant trivialise it. A burn survivor can be psychologically traumatised, an acne suffer can be psychologically traumatised. Anyone with a light, mild or heavy disfigurement can be psychologically traumatised. In fact I'd go as far as to say is you were to build a hierachy, which you cant with suffering btw, but if you were then from my opinion disfigurement which also brings mental torment, is joint number one on the human suffering chart.

This hydrogel needs funded, hopefully it will be funded by the end of the month.

Edited by seabs135, 21 November 2012 - 06:39 PM.


#3623 Lapis lazuli

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:56 AM

wowowowowow the time its go

the years go by, we age, our lives are going to hell, we find no solution to the problem of skin fucking ... best to avoid further suffering is fuck up dying of an illness or accident ... leaving behind people who want ...


No te preocupes tanto. Las cosas van a estar bien en el futuro.

Edited by Lapis lazuli, 22 November 2012 - 03:57 AM.


#3624 Vladislav

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 07:33 AM

Yes chuckstonchew, medical science is now 'hit or miss', that is the main reason why the progress was so stagnant and disappointing in all fields of medical science (including scarless healing), but in the future medical science will be transformed into information technology, so as a result it will advance exponentially rather than linearly, humans and all other organisms are actually spiritual machines and our DNA is our 'software' which consists of 23,000 different 'programs' called genes, if you think about the future of medical science think about the possibility of 'reprogramming' that 'software', think about Moore's law and its implications in about 25 years from now, e.i. think about 'nanobots' - billions of cheap, tiny computers with the size of a blood cell in your bloodstream, and think about recent Nobel Prize laureates for medicine: 2006 - discovery of RNA interference and the possiblility of inhibition of certain genes, 2009 - discovery of telomeres and telomerase enzyme and their role in the process of aging, 2012 - discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells which are very similar to embryonic stem cells, think about perspectives of those and other breakthrough discoveries.
And Ray Kurzweil predicts that in about two decades from now doctors will have tools to actually cure all diseases as a result of that paradigm shift in medical science and you should know that many of his previous predictions from the book 'The Age of Intelligent Machines' (1990) and 'The Age of Spiritual Machines' (1999) were amazingly accurate.

Here you can read something about drug discovery procedures ('hit or miss' medicine):

http://mavericksofth...ay-kurzweil-2-2

Now, this gets into my whole theory of information technology. Biology has become an information technology. It didn’t used to be. Biology used to be hit or miss. We’d just find something that happened to work. We didn’t really understand why it worked, and, invariably, these tools, these drugs, had side-effects. They were very crude tools. Drug development was called drug discovery, because we really weren’t able to reprogram biology. That is now changing. Our understanding of biology, and the ability to manipulate it, is becoming an information technology. We’re understanding the information processes that underlie disease processes, like atherosclerosis, and we’re gaining the tools to reprogram those processes.

Drug development is now entering an era of rational drug design, rather than drug discovery. The important point to realize is that the progress is exponential, not linear. Invariably people–including sophisticated people–do not take that into consideration, and it makes all the difference in the world. The mainstream skeptics declared the fifteen year genome project a failure after seven and half years because only one percent of the project was done. The skeptics said, I told you this wasn’t going to work–here you are halfway through the project and you’ve hardly done anything. But the progress was exponential, doubling every year, and the last seven doublings go from one percent to a hundred percent. So the project was done on time. It took fifteen years to sequence HIV. We sequenced the SARS virus in thirty-one days.

There are many other examples of that. We’ve gone from ten dollars to sequence one base pair in 1990 to a penny today. So in ten or fifteen years from now it’s going to be a very different landscape. We really will have very powerful interventions, in the form of rationally-designed drugs that can precisely reprogram our biochemistry. We can do it to a large extent today with supplements and nutrition, but it takes a more extensive effort. We’ll have much more powerful tools fifteen years from, so I want it to be in good shape at that time.


Here you can read something interesting about the future of regenerative medicine:
http://singularity.o...ative-medicine/

Tech Summary: Regenerative Medicine

In June 2011, Dr. Paolo Macchiarini led a team of surgeons in removing Andemariam Teklesenbet Beyene’s windpipe, or trachea, replacing it with an entirely synthetic version. This surgery was the first successful transplant of a completely artificial organ into a human being – one of the many exciting accomplishments in the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine.

The goal of regenerative medicine is rather straightforward: to replace or regenerate human tissues and organs to restore normal function. It includes the regeneration of any part of the human body, from simpler tissues such as skin, to more complex organs like the heart or liver.

Alexander Seifalian, a materials science engineer at University College London, used three-dimensional images of Beyene’s own trachea to construct the physical scaffold of the windpipe. The scaffold was then brought to Macchiarini’s lab, where scientists coated the structure with Beyene’s own stem cells, a process called “seeding”. Next, the scientists let the cells grow and multiply in a bioreactor, an oven-like device that mimics conditions within the human body. It was then just a matter of performing the surgery itself. Beyene is now cancer-free, and on the road to recovery.

The current standard involves using donor organs to treat irrecoverable organ damage. Patients of these procedures must take a lifetime of drugs to weaken their own immune systems to prevent their body from rejecting the organs. The new procedure sidesteps these complications completely; because Beyene’s own stem cells were used to construct his new trachea, there was little risk of his body rejecting the organ. Beyene’s body accepted the synthetic trachea, avoiding the need for immunosuppressant drugs.


So it is now possible to make an entirely synthetic windpipe from recipient's own stem cells, patient doesn't need immunosuppressant drugs, I'm sure it was considered 'SF' and 'to good to be true' stuff five or ten years ago, now it is really possible! And maybe after the synthetic windpipe the next 'big thing' in regenerative medicine will be the dextran hydrogel e.i. scar free healing!? Well at least I hope it will be.

Edited by Vladislav, 22 November 2012 - 08:07 AM.


#3625 patero89

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 02:05 PM

I have been following this topic for some time, and I have two concerns regarding hydrogel.

Firstly, Gerecht et al got the hydrogel produced, ready and they know how to use it (at least on mice). It may sound naive or stupid, but why cant they just find one person, get the person to sign a consent form, create a small, but full thickness wound in a barely visible place, put the hydrogel on and wait 3 weeks (I bet 50% of people on this forum would sign up for that). If there is no scar, the full-scale research could be attempted and at least we would have hope that it works on humans. But if the person scars, it shows that hydrogel discriminates and although it may be helpful for some other people/wounds, is not an ultimate solution and does not bring full regeneration. Even if it works on mice or pigs, we dont really care about that.

Secondly, if the hydrogel works, its a great news for us, but not for dermatological/pharmaceutical sector. If we could repair any skin damage (not just scars, think rosacea, acne, moles etc.) by creating new skin, there would be no need for lasers, expensive creams etc. As a result, these two sectors would lose blns of $ and they dont want that to happen. And since institutions/executives within these sectors have a lot of power and money, they may do a lot to prevent hydrogel from coming to market, or at least delay it.

#3626 Lapis lazuli

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:29 PM

Secondly, if the hydrogel works, its a great news for us, but not for dermatological/pharmaceutical sector. If we could repair any skin damage (not just scars, think rosacea, acne, moles etc.) by creating new skin, there would be no need for lasers, expensive creams etc. As a result, these two sectors would lose blns of $ and they dont want that to happen. And since institutions/executives within these sectors have a lot of power and money, they may do a lot to prevent hydrogel from coming to market, or at least delay it.


I don't really think one needs to be concerned about that. I was speaking to an eye doctor the other day at the hospital I work at and from that conversation too I got the impression that he really wanted to see things get better for people through medical advancements. Honestly, I think the whole "the medical world is corrupted and they don't care whether we live or die" argument should be laid to rest as it just ain't so...if you ask me.

Anyway, welcome to the forum. Posted Image

#3627 acnescar123

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 04:56 PM

Secondly, if the hydrogel works, its a great news for us, but not for dermatological/pharmaceutical sector. If we could repair any skin damage (not just scars, think rosacea, acne, moles etc.) by creating new skin, there would be no need for lasers, expensive creams etc. As a result, these two sectors would lose blns of $ and they dont want that to happen. And since institutions/executives within these sectors have a lot of power and money, they may do a lot to prevent hydrogel from coming to market, or at least delay it.


They'll always find a way to make money on it. Yes - the gel costs little money to produce, but what about the actual surgical procedure to cut out the scars, anesthesia, wound wrapping, post treatment creams etc. Look at how much recell costs- $800 machine, 2-5k for procedure. If it works as expected you're also expanding their market by a lot - lots of new people will come in to get "new" skin.

#3628 Vladislav

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 05:05 AM

SBIR is willing to fund STP705 and RXI109 scarless wound healing drugs:

Sirnaomics Received NIH SBIR Grant for Developing Its Scarless Wound Healing siRNA Therapeutics
http://www.prnewswir...-160227725.html

RXi Pharmaceuticals Awarded NCI SBIR Funding to Advance Self-Delivering RNAi Technology
http://www.rxipharma...nai-technology/

Edited by Vladislav, 23 November 2012 - 05:07 AM.


#3629 mars123

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 05:48 PM

Hmm, I have to say I'm disappointed that the army haven't got back on this (yet)

I'm still optimistic about the promise of the hydrogel, it's just annoying to know that whether the army say yes or no that they might drag their feet!

I really hope there is some sort of an answer by the end of the year - ggrrr

It must be annoying for the scientists too - it sounds like there are back sources of funding they intend to go after if the army turn this down - I just wish we get to know either way soon!! Posted Image

#3630 2001

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 01:43 AM

http://people.hofstr...ed Factor-1.pdf

Alginate impregnated with SDF1 "stromal cell derived factor 1" healed full thickness wounds in 9 days on mice and pigs- Scaring was vastly improved compared to control groups

This is why I am confused about the Hydrogel news. I know the Hydrogel works, but it's not just the Hydrogel that heals the wound it's the addtion of (VEGF165) VEGF human growth factor that was mixed into it. I am curious does the John Hopkins team intend to see if a non (VEGF165) version will work? I doubt it will Posted Image

You need something to stimulate the microvascular endothelial cells. These cells initiate the angiogenic process and stimulate rapid blood vessel growth which in turn leads to remodeled tissue and newly formed vasculature.

I wish I still had the link to the Hydrogel PDF. It's kind of depressing that the hydrogel isn't moving faster into a final product.

I find it weird that the alginate SD1 wounds healed faster than the Hydrogel VEGF165 treated wounds, and yet the alginate heals with a slight scar and the hydrogel heals with no scar.

Please hurry up John Hopkins Research. A lot of us are dying for this to become a reality.

My X broke up with me over my scars ( I wound up adding some new ones- I slashed my wrist after she left me- She ment the world to me, but she couldn't look past my defects )

If I didn't have these stupid scars. I highly doubt she would have left me. Some people think this is about vanity. No! it's about being normal and comfortable in our own skin.

Edited by 2001, 28 November 2012 - 01:59 AM.


#3631 seabs135

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 01:09 PM

BTW I'm sure there is a link to the paper on here somewhere 2001.
Heres are some facts: The hydrogel has nothing added to it. All it does is get degraded by the neutrophils. After 7 days the hydrogel has almost been digested. It is also known appendages do not grow in scar. This healed and regenerated a third degree burn completely in one week to 10 days. After 3weeks appendages were forming, yet on the control there was scar. The hydrogel got complete regeneration.

Edited by seabs135, 28 November 2012 - 01:11 PM.


#3632 mars123

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 03:14 PM

Hi 2000 - I'm sure, like seabs135 said that no growth factors were added - here is the original paper:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/76044860/Dextran-hydrogel-scaffolds-enhance-angiogenic-responses-and-promote-complete-skin-regeneration-during-burn-wound-healing

and it is specifically mentioned in articles about this paper in dec 2011 that the scientists were surprised to see complete regeneration with no growth factors or indeed, anything else added to the hydrogel! and that's what makes it so attractive

I'm sorry to hear about you're trouble with your X but I do believe we are living in the right time to see this problem get reversed - I know all too well that maddening feeling when others say 'oh, its just some scarring/or some acne' - you wish you could make them have it for one week and see how they feel!

anyway - here are some reasons to be positive:

[1] the hydrogel works - demonstrating in controlled experiments at one of the worlds leading medical institution that the hydrogel led to 100% regeneration in a 3rd degree burn - this has never happened before in world history!! - scar damage from acne does not extend deeper than a third degree burn!

[2] one of the researchers has given an interview to john hopkins magazine saying they want to take this to market - and going out of their comfort zone to do so [John Hopkins is/was usually a research for research's sake institution] - they lament in the article that they think JH has lost out in the past in losing money by not taking to market other discoveries - and we know they have approached the army to take their project further - and have back up plans of others to approach if the army don't want to help in next stage experiments -ie JH is determined to take this further, thinks it works, and thinks it could potentially make them a lot of money!

[3] the hydrogel is technically a device and NOT a drug - meaning the amount of trialing it needs to go to market, if is proved to work on humans, is radically reduced - one scientist involved even mentioned a trial period of 3 months[!] on humans if it gets to that stage [as opposed to drugs that work usually taking around 5-10years to get approved]

[4] I suspect some of the delay in the scientists moving forward [although a year from proof-of-concept to next stage experiments in the medical might not be classed as slow moving - and might even be considered fast] is that scientists involved have mentioned they are tinkering with adding antibiotics to the hydrogel - and trying to make it more sticky - ie. they believe it will work but recognize that they also need to find a way to keep the wound as sterile as possible whilst regeneration is taking place - and also they needed to find a way of helping it stick to contoured body skin - and I suspect they need to make a 2nd version of the hydrogel with these 2 properties added [which I don't think will be too hard] for the hydrogel to be practical in a medical setting

[5] regenerative medicine as a field is exploding is getting massive results already - just a quick google search of 'scientists regrow' will yield a list of things grown in the lab - and implanted in humans - I'm sure we've all read about the regrown windpipe - and spray-on skin to name just two - and with every major university in the world opening a regenerative medicine department there is only more to come!

Our problem - ie scarring - may be wrong - but this is the right time to have it!!

The days of the scar are numbered!

#3633 scarminator

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:17 PM

The thing that concerns me the most is not really whether the hydrogel works or not; in either case, we'll probably see scar free healing in the not too distant future.

Check out these pictures though: http://www.nature.co...re11499_F1.html

They show scarless healing in african spiny mice (I think this was posted earlier.) So, yes, the hair follicles regenerate, and, histologically, everything seems great. But what about hair patterning? IMO, you can clearly see that the hair pattern is quite fucked up, with new hairs growing in a less than perfect direction.

What do you guys think? Something that can be prevented if only contraction is stopped as well (this will be needed anyway to avoid asymmetries)?

I think there's a risk that scarfree healing never will equal perfect regeneration, at least not withtout some artifical component that can direct regeneration. Don't forget that hair follicles are formed in the fetus, and the fetus doesn't really look like an adult, so I don't see how hair patterning can't be messed up when the adult regenerates. May not be such a big problem if your scars are on vellus or non-hair bearing skin, but there will probably still be some textural discrepancies that may or may not be visible even then.

#3634 Maldition

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 11:31 PM

Stop dreaming about 3 months for sale hydrogel, bureaucracy is f@@@@@, some pharmaceutical interests will want to keep this product goes on sale.
What you should do is wait until year end, year-end if no news, next year should be a good time to start planning to create their own hydrogel. hydrogel dressing is so it should not be very difficult to make it? If Rome did not come home, go to Rome. are several here that we can be able to create hydrogels, take pictures of before and after, and to give people hope. The photos will be the best herramiente binding of truth, that the cure is possible, the dollars will be better spent in our lives, we can also help improve the lives of young people who are like when we come to this forum for so many years and . you just have to find people who can create this product, the key is to find an excellent guide fabrication and a fit person who can make it. stop waiting for something that never came. make a determination next year.

#3635 seabs135

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 07:13 AM

Scarminator, If you looked in the in the past paper you will see there are results that show the dextran was digested rapidly, the body then re-epithelized and created cells, and regenerated a 3rd degree burn with no scar.

Edited by seabs135, 29 November 2012 - 08:44 AM.


#3636 Vladislav

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:07 AM

The thing that concerns me the most is not really whether the hydrogel works or not; in either case, we'll probably see scar free healing in the not too distant future.

Check out these pictures though: http://www.nature.co...re11499_F1.html

They show scarless healing in african spiny mice (I think this was posted earlier.) So, yes, the hair follicles regenerate, and, histologically, everything seems great. But what about hair patterning? IMO, you can clearly see that the hair pattern is quite fucked up, with new hairs growing in a less than perfect direction.

What do you guys think? Something that can be prevented if only contraction is stopped as well (this will be needed anyway to avoid asymmetries)?

I think there's a risk that scarfree healing never will equal perfect regeneration, at least not withtout some artifical component that can direct regeneration. Don't forget that hair follicles are formed in the fetus, and the fetus doesn't really look like an adult, so I don't see how hair patterning can't be messed up when the adult regenerates. May not be such a big problem if your scars are on vellus or non-hair bearing skin, but there will probably still be some textural discrepancies that may or may not be visible even then.


Well I don't give a damn about hair patterning, the only thing that really concerns me about the hydrogel is whether regenerated skin textures will look the same as normal skin textures?

#3637 seabs135

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 08:33 AM

Well I don't give a damn about hair patterning, the only thing that really concerns me about the hydrogel is whether regenerated skin textures will look the same as normal skin textures?


If there was descrepencies then, there would be no appendages (appendages do not grow in scar tissue from second degree burns); and these descrepencies would either be because of fibrosis or necrosis. All tissues can only regenerate, scar or die. Scarring blocks of regeneration; and regeneration proves no scarring.

Edited by seabs135, 29 November 2012 - 08:37 AM.


#3638 chuckstonchew

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 10:31 AM


Well I don't give a damn about hair patterning, the only thing that really concerns me about the hydrogel is whether regenerated skin textures will look the same as normal skin textures?


If there was descrepencies then, there would be no appendages (appendages do not grow in scar tissue from second degree burns); and these descrepencies would either be because of fibrosis or necrosis. All tissues can only regenerate, scar or die. Scarring blocks of regeneration; and regeneration proves no scarring.



This ^^^
Scarminator, to my knowledge as well there's nothing in between regeneration and scarring. So the texture is going to be the texture of regular skin unless there is fibrosis and scar tissue. Which, as seabs said, since there were appendages that returned in a third degree burn, there could not have been scarring. I don't think there's anything else that could happen that would make the tissue that returns any different?

Regarding the hair, I'm thinking that picture was taking fairly soon after the injury so it's still returning to it's normal state and appearance. I'd say with a little more time that hair probably regained it's normalcy and blended in with the rest of the hair.

#3639 Vladislav

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:24 PM

http://people.hofstr...ed Factor-1.pdf

Alginate impregnated with SDF1 "stromal cell derived factor 1" healed full thickness wounds in 9 days on mice and pigs- Scaring was vastly improved compared to control groups

This is why I am confused about the Hydrogel news. I know the Hydrogel works, but it's not just the Hydrogel that heals the wound it's the addtion of (VEGF165) VEGF human growth factor that was mixed into it. I am curious does the John Hopkins team intend to see if a non (VEGF165) version will work? I doubt it will Posted Image

You need something to stimulate the microvascular endothelial cells. These cells initiate the angiogenic process and stimulate rapid blood vessel growth which in turn leads to remodeled tissue and newly formed vasculature.

I wish I still had the link to the Hydrogel PDF. It's kind of depressing that the hydrogel isn't moving faster into a final product.

I find it weird that the alginate SD1 wounds healed faster than the Hydrogel VEGF165 treated wounds, and yet the alginate heals with a slight scar and the hydrogel heals with no scar.

Please hurry up John Hopkins Research. A lot of us are dying for this to become a reality.

My X broke up with me over my scars ( I wound up adding some new ones- I slashed my wrist after she left me- She ment the world to me, but she couldn't look past my defects )

If I didn't have these stupid scars. I highly doubt she would have left me. Some people think this is about vanity. No! it's about being normal and comfortable in our own skin.


Hey I've just read that reseach paper and it is very interesting, now I have a few questions for all of you: correct me if I'm wrong, all wounds that were treated were full-thickness wounds (5 cm long or 2 inches) and they used alignate hydrogels as a delivery vehicle for SDF-1 protein and the result is on page 6, so the wound closure is significantly accelerated and the picture marked with 'H' seems to me like a complete skin regeneration (i.e. scar free healing) but I don't understand the picture marked with 'G' (control) - after 9 days I see no real scar, where is the scar? After how many days the formation of a scar begins?

The results are interesting, so are there any plans for further clinical trials and commercialization?

BTW wounds on african spiny mice heal in only 3 days:
http://www.empowernetwork.com/duncmd12/blog/scar-free-healing-mice-offer-clues-to-human-skin-repair/

The mice healed five out of six wounds in only three days, having “completely re-epithelialized.” It took another 30 days for the hair to regrow, but it was the same original color.
This process of re-epithelialization, the replacement of lost skin cells with new ones, is the key. When a wound happens, skin cells called epidermal cells “crawl” over the wound, covering it and establishing interactions to promote healing.



#3640 scarminator

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 02:03 PM



Well I don't give a damn about hair patterning, the only thing that really concerns me about the hydrogel is whether regenerated skin textures will look the same as normal skin textures?


If there was descrepencies then, there would be no appendages (appendages do not grow in scar tissue from second degree burns); and these descrepencies would either be because of fibrosis or necrosis. All tissues can only regenerate, scar or die. Scarring blocks of regeneration; and regeneration proves no scarring.



This ^^^
Scarminator, to my knowledge as well there's nothing in between regeneration and scarring. So the texture is going to be the texture of regular skin unless there is fibrosis and scar tissue. Which, as seabs said, since there were appendages that returned in a third degree burn, there could not have been scarring. I don't think there's anything else that could happen that would make the tissue that returns any different?

Regarding the hair, I'm thinking that picture was taking fairly soon after the injury so it's still returning to it's normal state and appearance. I'd say with a little more time that hair probably regained it's normalcy and blended in with the rest of the hair.


Thanks for your replies guys.

About the texture: I believe facial skin texture is heavily dependent on the size and density of adnexal ostia. If you look closely at your skin, you'll see a vast number of keratinous plugs filling these openings, likely contributing to the skin's matte appearance. For example, there is a recent study on the effects of fractionated lasers on burn scars that concluded that while there was a more normal collagen type I/III-balance and the scar was less stiff post treatment, there wasn't any difference in scar appearance. The researchers hypothesized that this was because of the lack of adnexal structures.

Now, if follicles regenerate, the texture will probably appear more normal, but if the size and density of the new follicles aren't exactly the same as in the surrounding tissue, there might still be some textural differences. For instance, think about someone with an orange peel texture cutting out a chunk of skin and then applying the hydrogel - even if there wasn't any fibrosis (clinical scarring), I have a very hard time seeing that the exact same orange peel texture would reappear (with the same follicular density and size as before,) thus creating demarcation lines of where the skin was cut out.

Hair follicle orientation probably doesn't matter here but, since it was the only observable feature on the mouse pictures, that's but one indication that the regeneration of previous follicles isn't perfect; some signal substances controlling the morphogenesis of new hair follicles have likely changed (and why wouldn't they have - they are extremely site specific (cf the sharp lines of the eyebrows) and the adult shape isn't the same as the fetal, where the original follicles once were developed.) To me, it seems that complete regeneration of superficial tissues will always require complete regeneration of the whole body part, mimicking fetal development step-by-step.

Anyway, not trying to be a downer here. If your scars aren't on hair-bearing skin, the problem will probably be minimal (and so much better than having a scar). For those of us with scars on the scalp or eyebrows though, we'll probably have to wait for some kind of artifical solution. My two cents though, hopefully I'm dead wrong Posted Image And perhaps you're right chuck, if the orientation issues aren't because of bad signaling (but contraction, for instance), maybe the hairs will realign over time.

Edited by scarminator, 29 November 2012 - 02:08 PM.





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