Scarless Healing

6,765 posts in this topic

You know what? I did until 6 years ago. In that very city. I still have friends and family there so I can make it back if need be. My mother-in-law got her PhD from Johns Hopkins so I know some people there. If it comes to where we need to make it, I can get back that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know what? I did until 6 years ago. In that very city. I still have friends and family there so I can make it back if need be. My mother-in-law got her PhD from Johns Hopkins so I know some people there. If it comes to where we need to make it, I can get back that way.

Perfect!! smile.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just came across this stem cell company who is using crowd funding to raise money for their research.

They're called Centagen and are developing anti-aging techniques with adult stem cells.

http://www.indiegogo.com/centagen

Anyway, I just thought I'd post this as an example of a medical company attempting to gain funding that is utilizing crowd funding.

We talked about this before. I think this could be a good option if the DoD doesn't come through.

You can ask dr Harmon if he is interested in crowd funding to raise money for his research but if he says 'no' do not continue insisting on it, then ask him if he has ever considered venture capital funding? Here you can learn something about venture capital funds:

http://www.investope...p#axzz2CSQTOvTE

In 2011 venture capital funds invested $29.4 billion in 3,904 deals:

http://nvca.org/imag...012_700x576.jpg

I really don't understand why they don't try to do that, there must be some good reason for it? shrug.gif The entire project is in 'standby' for more than a year, it's really pointless and and very frustrating (although I know that the funds will be approved sooner or later but it would be apsurd to wait for another few years for that to happen sad.png), they should just set up a company that they would called 'XYZ Therapeutics' or 'ABC Pharmaceuticals' or something like that, for such an extraordinary discovery venture capital firms would be willing to put money into research very quickly, if they were willing to fund Excaliard (EXC-001), RXi Pharma (RXI-109), Halscion and other scarless healing drugs and devices then I don't see a good reason why they wouldn't be willing to fund a potential cure for scars with such superior results.

Edited by Vladislav

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a new hydrogel being funded by the US Army that is essentially a biological filler which does not degrade (think silicone microdroplets except not synthetic plastic). I'm not exactly sure how, but they list accelerated wound healing as one of the possible applications.

http://web.mit.edu/n...solid-1116.html

Edited by trendycat
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a new hydrogel being funded by the US Army that is essentially a biological filler which does not degrade (think silicone microdroplets except not synthetic plastic). I'm not exactly sure how, but they list accelerated wound healing as one of the possible applications.

http://web.mit.edu/n...solid-1116.html

It has been proven that non degradable scaffolds create scar and degradable scaffolds create new tissue after degrading. Also that looks like it has been developed for long term drug release inside the body.

Edited by seabs135

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just came across this stem cell company who is using crowd funding to raise money for their research.

They're called Centagen and are developing anti-aging techniques with adult stem cells.

http://www.indiegogo.com/centagen

Anyway, I just thought I'd post this as an example of a medical company attempting to gain funding that is utilizing crowd funding.

We talked about this before. I think this could be a good option if the DoD doesn't come through.

I love the idea of crowd funding. I like the idea of a crowd saying fuck any procrastination and lets get this done asap. However I get the impression so far we have a flame and a few or more of us are tending the flame to keep it going, we are protecting it from being blown out. When what we would need on this thread is a roaring fire and a blaze for the crowd funding. I mean if this took off exponently, which I reckon there is a big chance it could. The thought of this instantly having the money, where any time wasting is completely eliminated, is empowering.

Edited by seabs135

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just came across this stem cell company who is using crowd funding to raise money for their research.

They're called Centagen and are developing anti-aging techniques with adult stem cells.

http://www.indiegogo.com/centagen

Anyway, I just thought I'd post this as an example of a medical company attempting to gain funding that is utilizing crowd funding.

We talked about this before. I think this could be a good option if the DoD doesn't come through.

I love the idea of crowd funding. I like the idea of a crowd saying fuck any procrastination and lets get this done asap. However I get the impression so far we have a flame and a few or more of us are tending the flame to keep it going, we are protecting it from being blown out. When what we would need on this thread is a roaring fire and a blaze for the crowd funding. I mean if this took off exponently, which I reckon there is a big chance it could. The thought of this instantly having the money, where any time wasting is completely eliminated, is empowering.

I agree. Merely the thought of crowd funding makes me feel empowered and excited. It could get it done so quickly. I think this is the answer. This is something that virtually everyone would enjoy the benefits of - an exponential take off is certainly possible if not likely. I will present the idea to Dr. Harmon at the end of this month. I hope he and the others see the potential crowd funding has. And I also hope something as new and untraditional as crowd funding would be an option they'd consider, being that JHU is a pretty prestigious, venerable research university...

And as far as this flame that we're tending to - how do you suggest we ignite it to the next level if and when we initiate this crowd funding approach?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just came across this stem cell company who is using crowd funding to raise money for their research.

They're called Centagen and are developing anti-aging techniques with adult stem cells.

http://www.indiegogo.com/centagen

Anyway, I just thought I'd post this as an example of a medical company attempting to gain funding that is utilizing crowd funding.

We talked about this before. I think this could be a good option if the DoD doesn't come through.

I love the idea of crowd funding. I like the idea of a crowd saying fuck any procrastination and lets get this done asap. However I get the impression so far we have a flame and a few or more of us are tending the flame to keep it going, we are protecting it from being blown out. When what we would need on this thread is a roaring fire and a blaze for the crowd funding. I mean if this took off exponently, which I reckon there is a big chance it could. The thought of this instantly having the money, where any time wasting is completely eliminated, is empowering.

I agree. Merely the thought of crowd funding makes me feel empowered and excited. It could get it done so quickly. I think this is the answer. This is something that virtually everyone would enjoy the benefits of - an exponential take off is certainly possible if not likely. I will present the idea to Dr. Harmon at the end of this month. I hope he and the others see the potential crowd funding has. And I also hope something as new and untraditional as crowd funding would be an option they'd consider, being that JHU is a pretty prestigious, venerable research university...

And as far as this flame that we're tending to - how do you suggest we ignite it to the next level if and when we initiate this crowd funding approach?

Personally I'd prefer the funding up front and in place now and the check cashed. So if they can get it now, the need for a social media for the crowd funding wouldn't be needed, So to me the thought of crowd funding is still secondary, however it still makes me excited as it has a 'fuck this procrastination'. It also gets me excited as it means in the back ground, who knows, we may have another financial gorilla backing it up. Still it still should get it this November for all we know. However there is a worry I have with crowd funding, what if the progress over time is curved, eg. for 1 year the crowd funding progress is slow and then it takes off exponently; whereas getting the DOD funding, despite the procrastination, could just be the signing of one check. It all depend on which one gets the funding first imo.

Regarding the flame, I'm no PR expert on social media, I dont even use facebook, but I believe the answer is social media in order to build up the flame. Who knows it could catch like wildfire in an instant, people donating, people doing fun runs, etc. However it still gets me that a lot of people who come onto this scar forum still don't see what is in plain sight and ignore this thread...

Edited by seabs135

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

seabs135, I totally agree that it's frustrating for people to ignore this thread but have to admit that the string of failures in recent years would be enough to make anyone pessimistic about anything's chance of success.

The way a site like indiegogo, Kickstarter and others like them work is that you set up your project and pick a date when it will go live. You set your funding goal as the minimum possible to complete the project and hope you get more obviously. The time frame is set by who creates the project but I think there is a limit of around one month to get your project funded.

In looking at indiegogo it seems they aren't like Kickstarter in the sense that if you fail to meet your goal you can still keep the money you raised if you choose their flexible funding option. The only difference is that if you meet your goal they take 4% and if you don't they get 9%.

In terms of raising awareness and lighting a fire, I think you'd need to reach out to organizations and media outlets that might want to cover it for a story. The Baltimore Sun wrote about the success of the hydrogel in testing so there is a precedent for a major city publication taking an interest (however, it'd be better to get either on television or tech and medical sites because newspapers are dying). From there as you said, push the hell out of it on Facebook, Twitter, blogs etc.

I've had friends use Kickstarter for their bands and raise upwards of $20,000. And that's just so they can make music so it can be done.

Vladislav, I'm sure Gerecht is exploring private investors as part of her strategy and I know that Harmon said in an e-mail that she was trying to set up her own small business through SBIR. Obviously, this would all be so much easier and move much faster if someone through a huge sum of money at them at once. Still hoping either private investors or the DoD come through.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imo you should go for kickstarter since it has a MUCH higher userbase and reach. Tbh I had never heard of indiegogo before seeing it on this forum, and myself and many of my acquaintances are familiar with kickstarter due to various news coverage, and projects that we've been interested in. Plus, I'm sure there's nothing that can stop you from doing an indiegogo fundraiser if the kickstarter one doesn't work out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

trendycat, You can't use Kickstarter for things that are non-creative (music, film, art, technology etc.). Since this falls under medical research we wouldn't be allowed to do it on there. indiegogo has no restrictions on types of funding campaigns so we could do it on there.

It sucks that Kickstarter doesn't do it because yes, they have more exposure. But in reality, with whatever site we were to use for this, we would still be the ones having to work hard to drive people to it. Whether that's a petridish.org or indiegogo or Kickstarter the challenges would be roughly the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay well in my opinion, indiegogo does not have anywhere near the exposure, nor does this skin regeneration pose enough of an interest to the general public to garner enough funding required (in the order of several hundred thousand dollars). The people that would want to fund this are people with already existing conditions that could be treated by this. In addition, how many of them will actually see the plee, and how many will actually go through with funding (and how much)? I've seen some medical funding requests on indiegogo in the past, even some that were interesting to me (stem cell treatments for aging). Despite the fact that it was interesting to me, I still didn't fund it because well, I don't go around throwing my money at medical research every day. It only managed to fund about nine thousand thousand out of its required eighty thousand. In my opinion, stem cells for life extension is a much broader subject than skin regeneration, and would apply to more people, yet it still didn't have the exposure or interest. Here's the request in question: http://www.indiegogo.com/centagen

I don't think it's worth wasting the researchers time, as crowdfunding doesn't seem to be the best option for funding medical research. It's something which people don't see a tangible benefit to themselves directly (what do I get out of pleding?) Scientific progress in general seems to be best funded by governments and private companies, not people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay well in my opinion, indiegogo does not have anywhere near the exposure, nor does this skin regeneration pose enough of an interest to the general public to garner enough funding required (in the order of several hundred thousand dollars). The people that would want to fund this are people with already existing conditions that could be treated by this. In addition, how many of them will actually see the plee, and how many will actually go through with funding (and how much)? I've seen some medical funding requests on indiegogo in the past, even some that were interesting to me (stem cell treatments for aging). Despite the fact that it was interesting to me, I still didn't fund it because well, I don't go around throwing my money at medical research every day. It only managed to fund about nine thousand thousand out of its required eighty thousand. In my opinion, stem cells for life extension is a much broader subject than skin regeneration, and would apply to more people, yet it still didn't have the exposure or interest. Here's the request in question: http://www.indiegogo.com/centagen

I don't think it's worth wasting the researchers time, as crowdfunding doesn't seem to be the best option for funding medical research. It's something which people don't see a tangible benefit to themselves directly (what do I get out of pleding?) Scientific progress in general seems to be best funded by governments and private companies, not people.

So then if they don't get funding from the government or a private company, what do you suggest? - Everyone just sits there and does nothing while the hydrogel is stagnated for more years? - It's already been a year without anything. I think we'd all agree that we want nothing more than for it to be funded by the government or a private company. Fact is though, it's just not happening (yet anyway) - and how long is everyone going to wait for it? Dr. Harmon clearly doesn't want to wait years for it as he's told me specifically that if the DoD doesn't come through this year then he'd like to discuss methods of generating the money with our group. Do you have a better method to bring to him then crowd funding?

The Stem Cell thing from Centagen is the same example I posted a week ago. I'd have to disagree and say that it certainly does not apply or appeal to more people than the hydrogel would. Centagen is only promising 'anti-aging techniques using stem cells' - What does that even mean? It's too broad and i don't even know exactly what they're promising to give us? - The hydrogel offers way more tangible results. 'Complete skin regeneration'. An unequivocal statement. Everyone knows exactly what it means and (being that it's so tangible) will be able to imagine and feel it's fantastic results as they come across it. They'll start thinking about different imperfections they have on their skin and realize that this could truly eradicate all of them. They'll think about the victims of burns or other accidents they know whose lives could be changed instantly with this. Anyone can see and value the hydrogel's potential, it is very tangible and real.

You're right though, if we just throw it up on indiegogo, it won't get enough exposure and generate enough interest. That is why if we do it, we have to be on top of our game and relentless with the word-spreading. Social networking, media, news channels, news papers, organizations, etc. We'll hit them hard and we'll hit them often. That's the answer to that. We just don't give up and relay the message to as many people and groups as we can.

Here's an article talking about how crowd funding is actually the perfect way to bridge the gap between scientists and the general public.

http://blogs.scienti...-sciences-ills/

This article's title states it perfectly and clearly why crowd funding has an edge over typical methods of gaining funds.

"From NIH Grants in Years, to Crowdfunded in Weeks"

http://www.ourmidlan...ce2a3cd0f6.html

If you look around the internet, you'll find a lot of positive stuff about why crowd funding could be and has been a very beneficial option, even for medical things like the hydrogel. It's not as simple as just throwing it up there - we have to build our audience and pitch a good case, but it can be done. Dr. Harmon is interested in our help and I think this is the best we have to offer - on top of generating a movement in which we spread the word like wildfire. Everyone, including the JHU researchers, wants to get this moving and this could do just that if it's executed well. And if not - at least we tried!

I also think that trials won't cost as much as you anticipated in your post. Remember, it's merely a medical device. Furthermore, the hydrogel is already fully developed and they've already completed the first part of the trials with mice.

Edited by chuckstonchew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

trendycat, while I agree that Kickstarter has more exposure I don't think that's a reason to not try with indiegogo. For one thing even if you don't meet your goal you get something if you pick their flexible funding plan. For another...how much time is really wasted for the researchers? You make a video pitching the idea with someone like Harmon and try to get it some press. That would be about it on their end I would think. They'd probably want people like us to help them push it. And that's where you get the eyeballs. A guy I know just got $20,000 for his band to finish their album so I know big amounts of money can be gained for things far less impactful and important than the hydrogel.

As far as stem cells for life extension vs. something like the hydrogel I agree with chuckstonchew. The hydrogel is tangible while the claims of Centagen and their life extension research are theories without any clinical evidence. Plus, the whole idea of life extension is controversial with many people thinking it's ethically and/or morally wrong to attempt it. Whereas the idea of giving people with horrific scars back their skin is something anyone could get behind.

I noticed that Centagen got more days for their campaign. It was at 7 days yesterday or the day before and now it's at 72. So that's another plus with indiegogo because I know you can't do that on Kickstarter.

Anyway, it's really only positives that derive from doing something like this. Even if the campaign fell short of it's goal, indiegogo still has the option to give you the funds with them getting a higher percentage.

Edited by golfpanther

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vladislav, I'm sure Gerecht is exploring private investors as part of her strategy and I know that Harmon said in an e-mail that she was trying to set up her own small business through SBIR. Obviously, this would all be so much easier and move much faster if someone through a huge sum of money at them at once. Still hoping either private investors or the DoD come through.

SBIR is a government program, just like NIH and DoD and their research-funding programs, whenever something is run by the government there are always more or less inefficencies, bureaucracy, corruption, lobbying, politics, etc (I'm know something about it because I'm an MBA student, just look at Amtrak and US Postal Service and their income statements, they constatly make very huge losses, year after year because they are run by the government) so I'm not very surprised that NIH, SBIR, DoD are not too much interested in this hydrogel, but venture capital funds are private investors, there are no such inefficencies, bureaucracy, corruption, lobbying, politics with private investors, I'm sure that those venture capital firms would be very interested in the hydrogel, so I don't understand why they don't try to address them? If there is a good reason for that at least I would like to know what is the reason? :shrug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vladislav, I know SBIR is a government run program but my point was that venture capitalists fund companies, not university's conducting research. By setting up a company through SBIR, or other means if she can, Gerecht would attract a lot more private investment money. Without a company, Gerecht is probably going to get nothing from anyone in the private sector unless someone is bold enough to go in with her on a startup. Don't really see that happening with a string of failures in this sector.

Again, I' sure Gerecht has tried to contact some firms that might be interested in funding her technology. But in all likelihood she didn't get any serious bites because there was no company.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wowowowowow the time its go

the years go by, we age, our lives are going to hell, we find no solution to the problem of skin fucking ... best to avoid further suffering is fuck up dying of an illness or accident ... leaving behind people who want ...


Scars are like diseases, destroy the lives of people...


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't know what you're talking about, if you would die of an ilness or accident now you would be like a soldier-participant in WW2 who was killed a week or two before the end of the war. BTW there are much worse things than scars, my sister works at Roche (producer of Accutane) as an consultant for their oncology drugs so I heard enough horrible stories about real human tragedies, that is a real hell.

Edited by Vladislav

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wowowowowow the time its go

the years go by, we age, our lives are going to hell, we find no solution to the problem of skin fucking ... best to avoid further suffering is fuck up dying of an illness or accident ... leaving behind people who want ...

Yikes. Overwhelming pessimism...

As we've stated numerous times - the hydrogel is very promising. It's only a matter of time before some sort of funding comes through.

And if the hydrogel for some reason does not work, I assure you something will in the near future. We are rapidly approaching a technological and medical revolution.

I think it was Vladislav who made some posts not too long ago regarding the future of medical technologies including genetics, nanotechnology and regenerative medicine. Up until very recently, medicine has been based on a 'guess and check' style approach. However, our new understanding of human biology and genetics means this is no longer the case. We can now understand on a molecular level why our bodies act the way they do. Thus, we will be able to cure (not treat) virtually any ailment that affects the human body cell-by-cell. Nanotechnology in particular will have the ability to restore/repair (or even augment) individual cells or DNA easily. Furthermore, now that the body is understood as an information technology, medicine is subject to Moore's Law - which means exponential growth - we're talking double the growth every year. It doesn't seem like much is happening now but soon it's going to EXPLODE!

In short - have patience. Skin problems will be a thing of the past in your life time. I know it sucks in the present but there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Do some research on the ideas of people like Robert Freitas and Ray Kurzweil. They'll surely raise your spirits in anticipation of what's to come! And in the meantime, count your blessings! And also give this hydrogel a chance and help us spread the word if/when we start a movement to gain funds. It's shown very real results and could be available for us to use very, very soon!

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW there are much worse things than scars,

@Vlad suffering is suffering, it is subjective and you cant trivialise it. A burn survivor can be psychologically traumatised, an acne suffer can be psychologically traumatised. Anyone with a light, mild or heavy disfigurement can be psychologically traumatised. In fact I'd go as far as to say is you were to build a hierachy, which you cant with suffering btw, but if you were then from my opinion disfigurement which also brings mental torment, is joint number one on the human suffering chart.

This hydrogel needs funded, hopefully it will be funded by the end of the month.

Edited by seabs135
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wowowowowow the time its go

the years go by, we age, our lives are going to hell, we find no solution to the problem of skin fucking ... best to avoid further suffering is fuck up dying of an illness or accident ... leaving behind people who want ...

No te preocupes tanto. Las cosas van a estar bien en el futuro.

Edited by Lapis lazuli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes chuckstonchew, medical science is now 'hit or miss', that is the main reason why the progress was so stagnant and disappointing in all fields of medical science (including scarless healing), but in the future medical science will be transformed into information technology, so as a result it will advance exponentially rather than linearly, humans and all other organisms are actually spiritual machines and our DNA is our 'software' which consists of 23,000 different 'programs' called genes, if you think about the future of medical science think about the possibility of 'reprogramming' that 'software', think about Moore's law and its implications in about 25 years from now, e.i. think about 'nanobots' - billions of cheap, tiny computers with the size of a blood cell in your bloodstream, and think about recent Nobel Prize laureates for medicine: 2006 - discovery of RNA interference and the possiblility of inhibition of certain genes, 2009 - discovery of telomeres and telomerase enzyme and their role in the process of aging, 2012 - discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells which are very similar to embryonic stem cells, think about perspectives of those and other breakthrough discoveries.

And Ray Kurzweil predicts that in about two decades from now doctors will have tools to actually cure all diseases as a result of that paradigm shift in medical science and you should know that many of his previous predictions from the book 'The Age of Intelligent Machines' (1990) and 'The Age of Spiritual Machines' (1999) were amazingly accurate.

Here you can read something about drug discovery procedures ('hit or miss' medicine):

http://mavericksofth...ay-kurzweil-2-2

Now, this gets into my whole theory of information technology. Biology has become an information technology. It didn’t used to be. Biology used to be hit or miss. We’d just find something that happened to work. We didn’t really understand why it worked, and, invariably, these tools, these drugs, had side-effects. They were very crude tools. Drug development was called drug discovery, because we really weren’t able to reprogram biology. That is now changing. Our understanding of biology, and the ability to manipulate it, is becoming an information technology. We’re understanding the information processes that underlie disease processes, like atherosclerosis, and we’re gaining the tools to reprogram those processes.

Drug development is now entering an era of rational drug design, rather than drug discovery. The important point to realize is that the progress is exponential, not linear. Invariably people–including sophisticated people–do not take that into consideration, and it makes all the difference in the world. The mainstream skeptics declared the fifteen year genome project a failure after seven and half years because only one percent of the project was done. The skeptics said, I told you this wasn’t going to work–here you are halfway through the project and you’ve hardly done anything. But the progress was exponential, doubling every year, and the last seven doublings go from one percent to a hundred percent. So the project was done on time. It took fifteen years to sequence HIV. We sequenced the SARS virus in thirty-one days.

There are many other examples of that. We’ve gone from ten dollars to sequence one base pair in 1990 to a penny today. So in ten or fifteen years from now it’s going to be a very different landscape. We really will have very powerful interventions, in the form of rationally-designed drugs that can precisely reprogram our biochemistry. We can do it to a large extent today with supplements and nutrition, but it takes a more extensive effort. We’ll have much more powerful tools fifteen years from, so I want it to be in good shape at that time.

Here you can read something interesting about the future of regenerative medicine:

http://singularity.o...ative-medicine/

Tech Summary: Regenerative Medicine

In June 2011, Dr. Paolo Macchiarini led a team of surgeons in removing Andemariam Teklesenbet Beyene’s windpipe, or trachea, replacing it with an entirely synthetic version. This surgery was the first successful transplant of a completely artificial organ into a human being – one of the many exciting accomplishments in the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine.

The goal of regenerative medicine is rather straightforward: to replace or regenerate human tissues and organs to restore normal function. It includes the regeneration of any part of the human body, from simpler tissues such as skin, to more complex organs like the heart or liver.

Alexander Seifalian, a materials science engineer at University College London, used three-dimensional images of Beyene’s own trachea to construct the physical scaffold of the windpipe. The scaffold was then brought to Macchiarini’s lab, where scientists coated the structure with Beyene’s own stem cells, a process called “seeding”. Next, the scientists let the cells grow and multiply in a bioreactor, an oven-like device that mimics conditions within the human body. It was then just a matter of performing the surgery itself. Beyene is now cancer-free, and on the road to recovery.

The current standard involves using donor organs to treat irrecoverable organ damage. Patients of these procedures must take a lifetime of drugs to weaken their own immune systems to prevent their body from rejecting the organs. The new procedure sidesteps these complications completely; because Beyene’s own stem cells were used to construct his new trachea, there was little risk of his body rejecting the organ. Beyene’s body accepted the synthetic trachea, avoiding the need for immunosuppressant drugs.

So it is now possible to make an entirely synthetic windpipe from recipient's own stem cells, patient doesn't need immunosuppressant drugs, I'm sure it was considered 'SF' and 'to good to be true' stuff five or ten years ago, now it is really possible! And maybe after the synthetic windpipe the next 'big thing' in regenerative medicine will be the dextran hydrogel e.i. scar free healing!? Well at least I hope it will be.

Edited by Vladislav

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been following this topic for some time, and I have two concerns regarding hydrogel.

Firstly, Gerecht et al got the hydrogel produced, ready and they know how to use it (at least on mice). It may sound naive or stupid, but why cant they just find one person, get the person to sign a consent form, create a small, but full thickness wound in a barely visible place, put the hydrogel on and wait 3 weeks (I bet 50% of people on this forum would sign up for that). If there is no scar, the full-scale research could be attempted and at least we would have hope that it works on humans. But if the person scars, it shows that hydrogel discriminates and although it may be helpful for some other people/wounds, is not an ultimate solution and does not bring full regeneration. Even if it works on mice or pigs, we dont really care about that.

Secondly, if the hydrogel works, its a great news for us, but not for dermatological/pharmaceutical sector. If we could repair any skin damage (not just scars, think rosacea, acne, moles etc.) by creating new skin, there would be no need for lasers, expensive creams etc. As a result, these two sectors would lose blns of $ and they dont want that to happen. And since institutions/executives within these sectors have a lot of power and money, they may do a lot to prevent hydrogel from coming to market, or at least delay it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a New Account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now