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Liquid Vaseline = Solid Vaseline ?


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#1 Nightwish

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 06:58 PM

Is Liquid Vaseline the same as Solid Vaseline?

I read that Liquid Vaseline is "Oil of Vaseline" and it's mainly used as a laxative.

Is it really Oil?

Does Liquid Vaseline clog pores or makes Acne get worse?

Is there a difference between them?

Thanks a lot!

Emanuel


#2 cassiopeia

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 08:48 PM

QUOTE(Nightwish @ May 1 2007, 08:58 PM) View Post
Is Liquid Vaseline the same as Solid Vaseline?

I read that Liquid Vaseline is "Oil of Vaseline" and it's mainly used as a laxative.

Is it really Oil?

Does Liquid Vaseline clog pores or makes Acne get worse?

Is there a difference between them?

Thanks a lot!

Emanuel


I'm by no means an expert on the Regimen, though I've used it ... but I would NEVER put ANYTHING Vaseline on my face ... it's petroleum-based oil, which as far as I know, will definitely clog your pores.

Perhaps a mod can elaborate on this though.

#3 cool as kim deal

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 09:45 PM

Vaseline actually won't clog your pores, but I think it feels disgusting even in small quantities on my face. Others disagree and swear by it to lock in moisture and protect their skin's barrier. I've actually never heard of liquid vaseline, though, the people here who do use vaseline use the solid kind in a tub.

#4 Guest_WhiteWater_*

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Posted 02 May 2007 - 07:37 PM

You are talking about parafinium liquidium which is closely related but more runny.
They are not comedogenic and repair barrier, but yes they can be greasy if not used properly.
However if applied only to dry areas sparingly they work very well, and hide flakiness, and definitely improve skin over time.

#5 Nightwish

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 09:20 AM

I hope it is the same :S

#6 whitershadeofpale

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 09:39 AM

I don't understand the whole anti-vaseline-mineral oil legend....my cleanser has mineral oil in it, and its the best cleanser i've ever used....it cleans my skin and moisturizes.

Heres what Paula Begoun says about mineral oil:

The notion that mineral oil and petrolatum (Vaseline) are bad for skin has been around for some time, with Aveda being the most visible company to mount a crusade deriding these ingredients. According to many companies that produce "natural" cosmetics, mineral oil and petrolatum are terrible ingredients because they come from crude oil (petroleum) and are used in industry as metal-cutting fluid (among other uses) and, therefore, can harm the skin by forming an oil film and suffocating it.

This foolish, recurring misinformation about mineral oil and petrolatum is maddening. After all, crude oil is as natural as any other earth-derived substance. Moreover, lots of ingredients are derived from awful-sounding sources but are nevertheless benign and totally safe. Salt is a perfect example. Common table salt is sodium chloride, composed of sodium and chloride, but salt doesn't have the caustic properties of chloride (a form of chlorine) or the unstable explosiveness of sodium. In fact, it is a completely different compound with the harmful properties of neither of its components.

Cosmetics-grade mineral oil and petrolatum are considered the safest, most nonirritating moisturizing ingredients ever found (Sources: Cosmetics & Toiletries, January 2001, page 79; Cosmetic Dermatology, September 2000, pages 44–46). Yes, they can keep air off the skin to some extent, but that's what a good antioxidant is supposed to do; they don't suffocate skin! Moreover, petrolatum and mineral oil are known for being efficacious in wound healing, and are also considered to be among the most effective moisturizing ingredients available (Source: Cosmetics & Toiletries, February 1998, pages 33–40).

Paula Begoun

www.cosmeticscop.com





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