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#41 aquaman

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 08:50 PM

so you used accutane in your early 20's, and now your say 35ish. Thats around 15 years. Now how can you say for sure that these things happening are because of the accutane? Im sorry but 15 years is a long time, maybee your looking for something to blame for the natural aging problems that you are having.

#42 lfrazier

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 06:18 PM

Hey, I am a new member and this is my first posting. I really just have a question about accutane. I have been on it twice before and had wonderful results that lasted about 2-3 yrs after each course. However, I need it again because I started breaking out really bad over the last year. The problem is, that I caused scars on my face from picking at the acne and I have recently over the last few months had punch excision to remove them. I know accutane can cause keloid scarring and you should wait 6months to a year before starting treatment for scars, but what if you already treated the scars and need to start accutane? I guess my question is how long should I wait after getting my last scar revision done before starting accutane? Is the time frame the same? One dermatologist doesn't want me to start accutane for a year, and another dermatologist I saw said to wait 6 weeks or maybe a little longer for the scars to heal and then he would put me on accutane. Sorry for such a long posting, I am just a little worried about causing keloids on my face!! Any info would be helpful, thanks in advance!~ Suzanne

#43 beautybecomes

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Posted 29 November 2004 - 02:56 PM

rolleyes.gif Hi! Well lets see...I started my second treatment with amnesteen(generic version of accutane) a bit over a month ago. In this time period i have had two allergic reactions on my face. My derm swore up and down it was not the accutane but a substance coming in contact with my skin. I just finished taking steriods for the second allergic reaction and my face is going back to normal. Well I can't help but feel accutane is somehow involved!!! Does anyone know or have an opinion regarding this? Any advice or comments would be appreciated. Thanks a bunch!

#44 lfrazier

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 07:23 PM

Well, I think accutane makes your skin more fragile and sensitive to certain things so that may be the reason for your problems with it.

#45 ueadian

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Posted 07 December 2004 - 03:09 PM

Alright sorry for the skepticism kalimuse_maze but due to the fact that you stopped taking Accutane so long ago I'm having a hard time accepting your symptoms as long term effects of Accutane. I have a few questions; Do you take vitamin suplements? The reason I ask is because ALL of your symptoms can be related to some vitanim deffeciency, specificaly vitanim E(this would also account for why your face / arms etc are dry but your hair isn't.). Make sure your getting a very balanced nutrition first off. Secondly I recomended seeing a doctor about this if you already havent. Wounds not healing in a normal fashion can be a multitude of serious medical condition. Most of which I can think of by name come about around your 30's anyways. I'm not saying that Accutane DIDN'T cause any of this I'm just concerned that it might be something more serious that you need to get checked out. Accutane has been proven to cause lasting skin dehydration but its usualy a consistent thing, not just developing 15 years therearfter. Check with your general doctor or dermatologist and post the results. And maybe I missunderstood some of your statements if so please tell me. And also, Accutane has been in use for over 40 years. There have been long term studies on the side effects of Accutane. Accutane is a lifesaver for a lot of people, pulling it from the shelves is a bit harsh, since in the majority of cases the long term side effects are miminal. It is a powerful drug there is no denying that but it is also one of the most effective treatment for resiliant Acne. I personaly tried everything else. B5 BP tricyclins retin a differin tazoraz etc., etc. and I'm on my 2nd cycle of Accutane. My first cycle resulted in about 90% clearing but I had a relapse immediately after. This second cycle is working amazingly fast and the breakout I experienced from my first cycle is almost completely gone in a week.

- beautybecomes I highly, highly doubt it was the Accutane. For 2 major reasons. Accutane is a vitanim A derivitive, and unless you have a high sensitivity to vitamin A I doubt you have an alergic reaction to Accutane. Secondly, Accutane is oral. If you were having an alergic reaction to it it would show symptoms in a more inside manner, not external. I guess I have 3, but this is more of a question, did you have this reactoin on your first course of Accutane? If you did I would reconsider my veiws but if you did not I'm pretty sure Accutane has nothing to do with it. Look to your facial products firstly and see if you have changed any products at the onset of this alergic reaction.

#46 blemishedgirl

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Posted 28 December 2004 - 04:09 AM

Acne is such a stupid little problem!!!! Why hasn't anyone found "THE CURE".

I notice that there are quite a few people who have been on accutane more than once. It seems to work for a few years after, but comes back. (I am on it myself for a second time)

What is different about those people that have clear skin??? Come on! they have hormones too! And if it's hormones, why didn't my acne clear up when I was one the BC pill??? What makes us acne sufferers different and why can't researchers find a simple cure?

Not one person in my family has this problem but ME. My mom has great skin. WHAT HAPPENED TO ME???

I am on accutane again because that is the only thing that ever worked. Even if it was for just a couple of years at a time. I hate having a crappy complexion. People view bad skin as a reflection of poor health. I also hate it when clear skinned people give you their hygene advice as if you didn't take care of yourself properly. They swear by their creams, soaps, and other topical remedies that don't do CRAP for someone who is truly inflicted with cronic acne.

I drink lots of water. I eat healthy. I work out. I have good hygene. What the hell???!!!

So, Accutane. Here we go again. I'm loading more poison into my body in the hopes that I at least appear healthy on the outside if only for a couple of years at a time. I'm not kidding myself. This stuff is horrible to our bodies. But I've litterally tried everything else.

#47 Rossignol

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Posted 31 December 2004 - 07:05 AM

Good luck with your treatment and let us know how you get on.
I hope it works for you - keep positive. smile.gif

#48 Carl

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Posted 10 January 2005 - 11:16 AM

Great post! eusa_clap.gif

#49 clawed

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 05:20 PM

Isotretinoin - Copied under license from wikipedia.org

Isotretinoin is a drug used for the treatment of acne. It is a retinoid, meaning it is derived from Vitamin A and is found naturally in the body, produced by the liver in small quantities. Isotretinoin is sold under many brand names, including Accutane® and Roaccutane® by Roche. It is also marketed as Accure® (Alphapharm), Oratane® (Douglas Pharmaceuticals), and Isohexal® (Hexal Australia).

History

Prior to the development of isotretinoin, the mainstay treatment of severe acne was oral antibiotics such as the tetracyclines and erythromycin. While these drugs have proven efficacy, they worked against only one contributing factor of acne, Propionibacterium acnes bacteria. The antibiotics gradually became less effective over time as more resistant strains of the bacterium became prominent.
An early, effective treatment of acne was high doses of the fat soluble vitamin A. At these dose levels (sometimes 500,000 IU per day) effects such as reduced production of sebum and dry hair could be noticed. However the vitamin also had many other prominent side effects which inhibited its widespread use.
The development of the derivative of retinoic acid, isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid), and its release in 1982 by Hoffmann-La Roche was a great step forward in the treatment of acne. The synthetic compound provided better therapeutic benefit than vitamin A, while also producing less side effects. In February 2002 Roche's patents for isotretinoin expired, there are now many other companies selling cheaper generic versions of the drug.
Today isotretinoin is usually prescribed after other acne treatments have failed to produce results. The treatment of acne usually begins with topicals, moves onto oral antibiotics (or a combination) and finally isotretinoin therapy. This is because other treatments, while less effective than isotretinoin, produce far fewer side effects.
[edit]

Available forms

Isotretinoin is available as Accutane® inside the USA and as Roaccutane® outside of the USA, both of these brands being produced by Hoffmann-La Roche. It is also available in other brand names around the world.
It is available as 10mg (light pink), 20mg (maroon) and 40mg (yellow) color coded capsules when sold as Accutane®, and other brands have similar systems.

Indications

Isotretinoin is indicated for treatment for a number of dermatological conditions, most commonly acne. It is generally not used as a first-line treatment due to the potential side effects. Antibiotics (such as the tetracyclines) are usually prescribed before isotretinoin.
Severe forms of acne (conglobata, fulminans and nodulocystic) as well as acne that scars can be successfully treated with isotretinoin.
Acne that has not responded to other treatment will usually respond to isotretinoin. Dysmorphobic patients may also be prescribed isotretinoin.

Pharmacodynamics

Isotretinoin noticeably reduces the production of sebum and shrinks the sebaceous glands. It stabilises keratinization and prevents comedones from forming. The exact mechanism of action is unknown, however it is known that it alters DNA transcription.
The dose of isotretinoin a patient receives is dependent on their weight and the severity of the condition. Generally it is prescribed from between .5mg/kg/day to 2mg/kg/day, for example a 70kg (155 pounds) person would take from between 35mg to 140mg per day dependant on the severity of their condition.
It should also be noted that some studies have associated remission of the condition with the total dose taken. It is generally advisable to take a dose of greater than 125mg/kg over the entire treatment period to see maximum benefit.

Pharmacokinetics
Absorption
Isotretinoin, when administered orally, is best absorped when taken after a high fat meal, as it has a high level of lipophilicity. In a crossover study, it was found that the peak plasma concentration more than doubled when taken after a high fat meal versus a fasted condition.
Distribution
Isotretinoin is primarily (99.9%) bound to plasma proteins, mostly albumin.
Metabolism
At least three metabolites have been detected in human plasma after oral administration of isotretinoin. These are 4-oxo-isotretinoin, retinoic acid and 4-oxo-retinoic acid. Isotretinoin also oxidises, irreversibly, to 4-oxo-isotretinoin.
Elimination
The metabolites of isotretinoin are excreted through both urine and feces. The mean elimination half life for isotretinoin is 21 hours, with a standard deviation from this mean of 8.2 hours.

Drug Interactions

Vitamin A, in supplement form, should be strictly avoided while undertaking therapy with isotretinoin. It increases the risk of side effects associated with use.
Tetracycline antibiotics, also prescribed for acne, should also be avoided. A significant increase in the risk of pseudotumor cerebri is associated with concurrent use of these drugs.

Side-effects

Isotretinoin has many side effects, listed in the table on the right. The more severe side effects are listed here in more detail.
It is also worth noting that the following side effects can persist, even after discontinuing therapy:

* Alocepia (Hair Loss)
* Arthralgias
* Decreased night vision

Teratogenicity

Isotretinoin is a teratogen, it is highly likely that if taken during pregnancy that it will cause birth defects. In the USA isotretinoin is in pregnancy category X. Accutane must be prescribed under a policy that mandates that female patients be placed on two separate, effective forms of birth control [1]. Male patients should be informed of the risk associated with use during pregnancy, emphasising that they should not share the drug, especially with females.
In the U.S. more than 2,000 women have become pregnant while taking the drug between 1982 and 2003, with most pregnancies ending in abortion. About 160 babies with birth defects were born. Doctors normally require two separate methods of birth control for sexually active women taking Accutane and until one month after terminating the drug.

Depression

Many studies [2] [3] [4] have emerged linking isotretinoin to depression. It must however be acknowledged that its primary use is for the treatment of the most severe acne. The possibility that this severe acne is causing the depression is therefore not to be ruled out.

External links
*Hoffmann-La Roche (Makers of (Ro)accutane)
*FDA's Accutane Information Page
*Accutane Action Group (Group of people who suffered continuing side effects from isotretinoin).
*Acne.org (provides a forum on which many people keep diaries on Accutane use)
*Australian Roaccutane Survivors (Similar to AAG above)
*Drugs.com Isotretinoin Information

13-cis-retinoic acid

Elimination half life: 21 hours
Excretion: Feces and Urine
Pregnancy category: X (USA), X (Aus)
Legal status: Prescription
Delivery: ?

Indicated for: Severe Recalcitrant Nodular Acne

Contraindications:
Pregnancy and/or Breast feeding
Hypersensitivity to Isotretinoin
Sensitive to parabens

Interactions:
Vitamin A]
Tetracyclines

Side effects:
Severe:
Teratogenic (Severe birth defects)
Suicide

Cardiovascular
Palpitation, Tachycardia, Stroke, Vascular Thrombotic Disease

Ear, nose, and throat:
hearing impairment, tinnitus

Endocrinal:
hypertriglyceridemia

Eye:
corneal opacities, decreased night vision, cataracts, color vision disorder, conjunctivitis, dry eyes, eyelid inflammation, keratitis, optic neuritis, photophobia, visual disturbances

Gastrointestinal:
inflammatory bowel disease, hepatitis, pancreatitis, bleeding and inflammation of the gums, colitis, esophagitis/esophageal ulceration, ileitis, nausea

Hematological:
allergic reactions, nemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, agranulocytosis

Musculoskeletal:
skeletal hyperostosis, calcification of tendons and ligaments, premature epiphyseal closure, decreases in bone mineral density, arthritis, tendonitis, rhabdomyolysis

Neurological:
pseudotumor cerebri, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, insomnia, lethargy, malaise, nervousness, paresthesias, seizures, stroke, syncope, weakness

Psychological:
suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, suicide, depression, psychosis, aggression, violent behaviors, emotional instability

Respiratory:
bronchospasms, respiratory infection, voice alteration

Skin:
acne fulminans, alopecia, bruising, cheilitis, dry mouth, drynose, dry skin, epistaxis, eruptive xanthomas, flushing, fragility of skin, hair abnormalities, hirsutism, hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, infections, nail dystrophy, paronychia, peeling of palms and soles, photoallergic/photosensitizing reactions, pruritus, pyogenic granuloma, rash, sunburn susceptibility
increased, sweating, urticaria, vasculitis, abnormal wound healing

Urogenital and reproductive:
abnormal menses

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Isotretinoin".

#50 zuzyque

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 08:42 PM

To keep your lips nice and smooth, use Mary Kay satin lips mask. It exfoliates all of the dry skin on your lips, keeping them nice and smooth. And of course always use a lot chapstick, my fav is Burt's Bees.

#51 natalia321

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Posted 12 February 2005 - 02:26 PM

Hello, I just took my first Accutane (Amnesteen) pill yesterday. I am at 40 mg and am supposed to stay with that the whole treatment. My dermatologist told me to keep on using my normal products, tazorac and benzacylin (only used when I have an actual pimple, not used everyday). But I do use Tazorac cream every night on my whole entire face just because. He said I shouldn't have a problem since it is a cream and that I will only have to stop if I get really dry, but since its a cream i shouldn't have a problem. He also told me to continue using my salcilyic face wash and camomille and godfrey toner. I think that all of this might be to much for my poor skin to handle with the accutane,but thats what he recommended. But hes also just mad because I stopped paying $500 a month for his lasers that didn't work, so I'm thinking he said to use thoses things even though it might not be in my skin's best interest. Did anyone else keep on using their regular reutine while on accutane? Thanks!

#52 Salads

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 02:21 AM

i was placed on the same mg you are, and have dropped everything except for purchasing a gentle cleanser that i use morning and night. the rest of the time i just keep myself moisturized.

#53 SiiMo

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 05:02 PM

Cleaning While on Accutane

Is it ok to use facial Scrubs while on it if used lightly, also what facial cleaning products are best to use ???

Many thanks
MSN - Si_ibiza@hotmail.com

#54 natalia321

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 07:51 PM

Hello, OK, I have a question for everyone. It is my knowledge that the red marks that are left after breakouts are just inflammation-really nothing more. If its indented or whatever then it is a more sever scar, but generally speaking it is just inflamation if its a bunch of little red/pink dots. This is at least what my dermatologist Nissan Pilest told me (the best dermatologist in OC, he is seriously really good!). Anyways, it is also my understanding that Accutane generally clears up inflamation, while preventing new acne from forming.

SO I guess my question is, why do I see all these people saying on these Message Boards that Accutane has absolutely nothing to do with healing red spots? I have just started Accutane, but I just think it would make sense for it to help. I'm starting to think that maybe these people had very large scars and now they have small ones and are just upset that the Accutane didn't take them away completely. So I'm thinking maybe (hopefully!) since my scars are not very large, however I believe they do have a large quantity, but that Accutane will essentially banish them. Am I leaving in a dreamworld when I say this?

For example, like Jenn's Accutane Journal (the first journal Google gives! http://jmhpr.tripod....accutanediary/) she started out incredibly inflamed and then at the end she was not inflamed. Now if I were to start with scars like her 12 week pictures, wouldn't the Accutane decrease that inflamation, just as it did for her week 1 to week 20?

WOW, this was super long and I didn't mean for it to come out making me sound like such a dork! rolleyes.gif But I just wanted to see if anybody could answer and I wanted to make myself very comprehensible!

#55 dj_tml

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 08:27 PM

it says here that alchohol is not reccommended too consume, but is there a time you should wait -after- accutane treatment before it is ok for your body to intake alchohol?

#56 Kidchan81

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 05:43 AM

From what i am experiencing, the red spots usually heal after some time. Depends on individuals and how serious it is. As for me it took damn long for it to heal. Cos now my acne skin is very severe that several red marks are all over my face. And my dermatologist told me that it will take half a year to actually heal. And i have several deep scars occuring. and these scars i dun think it will be banish even after taking occutane. Sorry to say this, dun intend to depress you but i believe that the scars wont fade off easily but time will heal. Although i dun think it will vanish totally, but at least hopefully it wont be that obvious cos i think theres some scars treatment available though its very ex but i intend to save up money and go for it. So think positively. eusa_angel.gif

#57 rOCstar

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 11:48 PM

i drink an awful lot on accutane, i probably shouldnt but i really cant help it. smile.gif

can you blame me though?

#58 Marina_M

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Posted 19 February 2005 - 08:34 AM

re: long term maintenance -- I took a 1mg/kg dose and was having a terrible reaction (that caused scarring -- which my acne never caused despite having cystic acne since age 11), so my MD lowered the dose to .5mg/kg. Still, scarring. By the third month my old skin "shedded" like s snake's and revealed decent skin (albeit with some scarring now, which is distressing). Within one month of discontinuing Accutane, my skin began getting oily again -- by month 8 my skin was bad enough to go back on. By this time, I had done research into what other countries are doing (countries that aren't so litgious towards the healthcare industry. Countries that actually properly prescribe Accutane to women -- I hope y'all know that men are prescribed Accutane far more than women in the U.S.). Many of the research I uncovered said women with acne past the age of 25 often have it till their 40s or later (that is, it's a chronic condition), and to maintain them on 20mg twice/week. I had 40mg capsules, so I did 40mg once a week. After having cystic acne for 20 years, my skin was pristine. I was fortunate to be dating a physician to get the prescription this way. If I recall correctly New Zealand had a good web page about long term use at such a low dose on their public health site (good lay info -- for hardcore journal articles you'll probably have to hit a medical search engine or a medical library). A friend was put on a so-called maintenance dose of 40mg/day for 2 years by US MD - -couldn't believe it, she probably would have been fine with once a week as well (she has permament eye problems). I also recently met someone that never took the high dose that causes scarring and uncomfortable drying (lucky her) -- she started at 10mg/d, and is now titrating down. Roche and NIH will probably never pay to do a study to see if super-low dose maintenance is a good regimen -- I work in pharmaceuticals and could go into how they are approved, how proper doses are determined, etc but it's a long story. Fortunately we don't need their help, as other countries are doing just fine with the research. One last thing (non-Accutane related) -- my endocrinologist said some women get cyproterone from Europe -- she said it's much more effective than aldactone.

#59 Marina_M

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Posted 19 February 2005 - 08:58 AM

beauty -- if you used brand name (or different generic) the first time you were on Accutance and didn't have these problems, then go back to what you took the first time (at the same or lower dose). If you were on the same brand: it is possible that you can develop an allergy to something you've been exposed to for years and years (if it turns out you do indeed have an allergy or sensitivity reaction). One test is to take an antihistamine and see if it help -- if it does, you might have an allergy (though sometimes antihistamines decrease inflammation w/o the presence of an allergen simply because blocking histamine decreases redness/swelling from other causes sometimes). Of course run all of this by your MD. BTW, I don't know what your symptoms are, but your pharmacist is wrong to say the allergy must be from something topical just because it appears on your skin. It may turn out to be something topical causing it in your case, but plenty of people have skin reactions to ingested food/meds (think hives, swelling, etc). But to be on the safe side, if you recently bought new soap etc go back to the old. Also tell your MD if you started any new meds. Advil, for instance, can cause facial swelling.

#60 zuzyque

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Posted 24 February 2005 - 12:21 PM

Polar419, I was told the same thing by my doctor that accutane would help my red marks, and it has. I haven't even been on accutane for a full month and my red marks have lightened up. Mine weren't horrible but they were bad, and it affected me everyday I hated to see my face, I would try to concel them with a lot of make up. And now I almost never wear make up. So don't listen to these people who say it doesn't help the red marks cause it does, so keep up with the regimin your doc gives you and good luck!




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