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ACNE DIET, CLEANSING & LEAKY GUT SYNDROME RESOURCE GUIDE


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#101 royalty

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 09:38 AM

How do i know if i have a leaky gut? And how long time does it take to stop breakouts from a leaky gut? I mean if having a leaky gut causes food allergies and you just consume a lot of that your gonna have acne anyway? Must be an easier way?

#102 dbhappy

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 09:37 PM

Please check out GAPS diet it will clear your acne and help you emotionally!

Edited by dbhappy, 28 November 2012 - 09:41 PM.


#103 Ind1g0

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:45 PM

I feel badly for calling this person out, but AppleBlossem gave some very bad advice and I urge no one it, as it is based on very outdated and portly informed medical and dietary literature

#104 alternativista

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 11:13 AM

Blog many might like by a Med student with an interest in evolution. In other words how things we are supposed to do/eat help maintain health while all these unnatural lifestyle and diet habits cause disease. It's called Principle Into Practice.

This article is about how Saturated fat benefits both leaky gut and liver health: http://principleinto...saturated-fats/

Cells from the small intestine of mice maintained on a diet high in SAFA, in comparison to those maintained on a diet high in PUFA, have significantly higher levels of mRNA coding for a number of the proteins that are important for intestinal integrity such as Tight Junction Protein ZO-1, Intestine Claudin 1, and Intestine Occludin. Furthermore, alcohol consumption further decreases the mRNA levels of most of these genes in animals fed a high-PUFA containing diet, while alcohol has no effect on levels in SAFA-fed animals. Changes in mRNA level do not necessarily mean changes in protein levels, however the same study showed an increase in intestinal permeability in mice fed PUFA and ethanol in comparison to control when measured by an ex-vivo fluorescent assay. This shows that PUFA alone can disturb the expression of proteins that maintain gut integrity, and that alcohol further diminishes integrity. In combination with a SAFA diet, however, alcohol does not affect intestinal permeability [4].

Cells from the small intestine of mice maintained on a diet high in SAFA, in comparison to those maintained on a diet high in PUFA, have significantly higher levels of mRNA coding for a number of the proteins that are important for intestinal integrity such as Tight Junction Protein ZO-1, Intestine Claudin 1, and Intestine Occludin. Furthermore, alcohol consumption further decreases the mRNA levels of most of these genes in animals fed a high-PUFA containing diet, while alcohol has no effect on levels in SAFA-fed animals. Changes in mRNA level do not necessarily mean changes in protein levels, however the same study showed an increase in intestinal permeability in mice fed PUFA and ethanol in comparison to control when measured by an ex-vivo fluorescent assay. This shows that PUFA alone can disturb the expression of proteins that maintain gut integrity, and that alcohol further diminishes integrity. In combination with a SAFA diet, however, alcohol does not affect intestinal permeability [4].

Improved gut integrity is no doubt a key aspect of the protective effects of SAFA. Increased gut integrity leads to decreased inflammatory compounds in the blood, which in turn means there will be decreased inflammatory interactions in the liver. Indeed, in comparison to animals fed alcohol and PUFA, animals fed alcohol with a SAFA diet had significantly lower levels of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-a and the marker of macrophage infiltration MCP-1 [4]. Decreased inflammation, both systemically and in the liver, is undoubtedly a key element of the protective effects of dietary SAFA.


4. Kirpich, I.A., W. Feng, Y. Wang, Y. Liu, D.F. Barker, S.S. Barve, and C.J. McClain, The type of dietary fat modulates intestinal tight junction integrity, gut permeability, and hepatic toll-like receptor expression in a mouse model of alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol Clin Exp Res, 2012. 36(5): p. 835-46.

Blog many might like by a Med student with an interest in evolution. In other words how things we are supposed to do/eat help maintain health while all these unnatural lifestyle and diet habits cause disease. It's called Principle Into Practice.

This article is about how Saturated fat benefits both leaky gut and liver health: http://principleinto...saturated-fats/

Cells from the small intestine of mice maintained on a diet high in SAFA, in comparison to those maintained on a diet high in PUFA, have significantly higher levels of mRNA coding for a number of the proteins that are important for intestinal integrity such as Tight Junction Protein ZO-1, Intestine Claudin 1, and Intestine Occludin. Furthermore, alcohol consumption further decreases the mRNA levels of most of these genes in animals fed a high-PUFA containing diet, while alcohol has no effect on levels in SAFA-fed animals. Changes in mRNA level do not necessarily mean changes in protein levels, however the same study showed an increase in intestinal permeability in mice fed PUFA and ethanol in comparison to control when measured by an ex-vivo fluorescent assay. This shows that PUFA alone can disturb the expression of proteins that maintain gut integrity, and that alcohol further diminishes integrity. In combination with a SAFA diet, however, alcohol does not affect intestinal permeability [4].

Cells from the small intestine of mice maintained on a diet high in SAFA, in comparison to those maintained on a diet high in PUFA, have significantly higher levels of mRNA coding for a number of the proteins that are important for intestinal integrity such as Tight Junction Protein ZO-1, Intestine Claudin 1, and Intestine Occludin. Furthermore, alcohol consumption further decreases the mRNA levels of most of these genes in animals fed a high-PUFA containing diet, while alcohol has no effect on levels in SAFA-fed animals. Changes in mRNA level do not necessarily mean changes in protein levels, however the same study showed an increase in intestinal permeability in mice fed PUFA and ethanol in comparison to control when measured by an ex-vivo fluorescent assay. This shows that PUFA alone can disturb the expression of proteins that maintain gut integrity, and that alcohol further diminishes integrity. In combination with a SAFA diet, however, alcohol does not affect intestinal permeability [4].

Improved gut integrity is no doubt a key aspect of the protective effects of SAFA. Increased gut integrity leads to decreased inflammatory compounds in the blood, which in turn means there will be decreased inflammatory interactions in the liver. Indeed, in comparison to animals fed alcohol and PUFA, animals fed alcohol with a SAFA diet had significantly lower levels of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-a and the marker of macrophage infiltration MCP-1 [4]. Decreased inflammation, both systemically and in the liver, is undoubtedly a key element of the protective effects of dietary SAFA.


4. Kirpich, I.A., W. Feng, Y. Wang, Y. Liu, D.F. Barker, S.S. Barve, and C.J. McClain, The type of dietary fat modulates intestinal tight junction integrity, gut permeability, and hepatic toll-like receptor expression in a mouse model of alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol Clin Exp Res, 2012. 36(5): p. 835-46.

#105 Seeking2012

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 04:09 PM

Now, if we can all begin to think of acne as an inflammatory skin disease first, and for now everything else about it second, we can move on to figuring out WHAT we need to do to trace the source of inflammation and HOW to stop it!

Peace style_emoticons/default/eusa_angel.gif


Excellent post. I have been reading about inflammation for a few weeks now as it relates to a number of human chronic diseases, but I'm still confused on exactly WHAT inflammation means. I know that it is some type of response of the immune system, and that acute amounts of inflammation are good but that chronic inflammation is bad. But here are my questions, and maybe by now someone has figured out the answers because the OP was made years ago:

1. What is the precise definition of inflammation?
2. What is causing the inflammation?

I have read various theories that the cause of inflammation varies from person to person but I happen to think that this is because of a weakened or overzealous immune system, and that there are only a few true common sources of inflammation for all people, and that these few sources of inflammation (when chronically exposed to our bodies) teach or trick our immune systems to react to a much wider variety of triggers.

Thanks.

Edited by Seeking2012, 03 December 2012 - 04:10 PM.


#106 SoupHero

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 11:53 PM

How do i know if i have a leaky gut? And how long time does it take to stop breakouts from a leaky gut? I mean if having a leaky gut causes food allergies and you just consume a lot of that your gonna have acne anyway? Must be an easier way?

There are tests (lactulose manitoll test) but they may not available in all countries. Easiest is to make a 36 hour fast followed by a radical change to the diet and see if there is improvement.
When offending foods (the one that cross the leaky intestinal barrier and trigger inflammation like gluten, lactose) is removed improvement can be seen in 3 - 10 days. To heal the leaky gut it takes much longer and (3-6 months) and when you have successfully done that you can again eat gluten or lactose with no ill effect.