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Week 4 - It's Getting Ugly!

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What a week from hell. Two days ago we upped the dosage from 20mg to 40mg. First I should start by saying that my son isn't feeling well. I had to pick him up early on Thursday and he stayed home on Friday. If you read the entry before this one, you know all about the flare up. Basically upon vomiting, one of the cysts on his face instantly filled with fluid and he wound up with a marble under his skin. It was quite scary. We saw the doctor this morning and he gave him some cortisone to settle it down.

Today he stayed home from school. He took his first bleach bath to try per his doctor's instructions. He also started a probiotic.

The worst is that he is in so much pain. He also has a huge flareup on his shoulder and he has been in tears tonight. I simply can't keep him home from school any more. He is falling behind.

Today is day 28. I fell like we just started treatment and it is already so bad. I am very afraid as to how much worse it's going to get before it is better. His skin and lips are very dry. He is clearly upset and I am worried about him.

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What is a bleach bath? Is the dermatologist concerned that he has too much bacteria on the skin? I get cysts under my armpit from shaving and I use a product called Hibiclens (Chlorhexidine Gluconate). It is an antiseptic cleanser. Your son could try Hibiclens as a shower gel. see http://www.hibiclens.com/retail

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This is from the dermatologist:

Swimming pools are chlorinated to help cut down on microbes living in the water. Soaking in this special water will help cut down on microbes living on your skin.

Itching, scratching and the immune dysregulation of atopic dermatitis lead to an increased risk of infection from superficial skin flora, especially Staphylococcus aureus. One technique that can help decrease the number of infections and possibly reduce the need for antibiotics in patients with eczema is called
"Bleach Baths". Here are our simple recommendations:

Steps:

1. Start by adding lukewarm water to fill a tub for a normal bath (about 40 gallons)

2. Put 1/4 to 1/2 cup of common liquid bleach into the water. Check the bleach bottle to make sure the concentration of bleach (also known as sodium hypochlorite) is about 6%

3. Completely mix the added bleach in the wter. This should create a solution of diluted bleach

4. Soak in the chlorinated water for about 10 minutes

5. Thoroughly rinse the skin clear with lukewarm fresh water at the end of the bleach bath

6. As soon as you're finished rinsing off, pat dray. Do not rub dry as this is the same as scratching

7. Immediately apply any prescribed medication and/or emollients

8. Repeat bleach baths 2-3 times a week or as prescribed by the physician.

The following restrictions may apply:

Do not use the undiluted bleach on the skin. Even diluted bleach baths can potentially cause dryness and/or irritation

Do not use bleach baths if there are many breaks or open areas in the skin (for fear of intense stinging and burning)

Do not use bleach baths in patients with a known contact allergy to chlorine

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Oh. Thanks for the info. The Hibiclens can be used everyday and may help his bacne.

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