magazineI’ve noticed over the years that anything I read about acne in magazines is usually replete with errors and terrible misinformation. I’m at my dad’s house for a few days right now and my step mother gets Fitness magazine. The cover claims “Clear Skin Breakthroughs That Really Work.” I had to crack it open and read it. Their advice boils down to using salicylic acid and perhaps staying away from milk. Wow. Such bad advice. First of all, anyone who researches acne to any degree knows that salicylic acid is very weak at controlling breakouts. The legal limit for salicylic acid products is 2% and at this concentration it does very little if anything to help clear the skin. And milk has been associated with breakouts in only very limited, confusing studies based on people recalling what they ate many years previously. This evidence is so flimsy that the authors in The Journal of Clinics in Dermatology concluded, “Our conclusion, on the basis of existing evidence, is that the association between dietary dairy intake and the development of acne is slim.”

unnamed-2I could go on and on here picking apart the deep horrendousness of this one supposed “Clear Skin Ahead” article as it is titled inside the magazine, but suffice it to say that this article will do nothing for anyone other than cause them frustration and confusion. This is true of upwards of 90% of other articles I have read in major magazines over the years. Can you tell I’m mad? Well, I am. Ok, I just have to quote one more thing from this article. Haha. Keep in mind that almost every journalist who has ever interviewed me has misquoted me, so I’m not dogging the doctor here. But they quote a doctor saying, “sweat and bacteria left on the skin after a workout can be a breeding ground for breakouts…” The reality is that bacteria on the surface of the skin has zero to do with acne. Zero. It is bacteria deep within the skin which causes acne. Far from clearing things up for the readers of Fitness magazine, this quote just reinforces yet another myth about acne.

Bottom line: Don’t believe pretty much anything you read in magazines about acne. And to extrapolate, don’t believe pretty much anything you read in magazines period.

One of the topics I came across in my recent research was chemical peels. I realized Acne.org was missing a chemical peels page so I went ahead and made one. Have a read to get the full story. Here’s a quick bottom line:

Based on six recent articles printed in respected medical journals regarding chemical peels and acne, the concensus is that chemical peels seem to help reduce acne more than placebo, but not by much. They can be a fun adjunct to acne therapy, but probably should not be relied upon to produce significant clearing.