NicotinamidesmallNicotinamide (AKA niacinamide or nicotinic amide), a vitamin B3 derivative, may be a welcome adjunct ingredient in an acne sufferer’s arsenal. I say adjunct because it is unlikely to produce adequate levels of clearing on its own, but may help boost otherwise lacking treatment protocols. It has a fairly good track record over the years and two recent studies further corroborate its acne fighting prowess. The first of the two studies compared 5% nicotinamide gel against 2% clindamycin (a topical antibiotic) and found them to be equally effective, with no side effects seen from the nicotinamide gel. The second study pitted 4% nicotinomide against 1% clindamycin. The researchers of this study came to a similar conclusion: “The efficacies of 4% nicotinamide and 1% clindamycin gels are comparable in treating moderate inflammatory facial acne vulgaris.”

Nicotinamide is available over-the-counter but is not found in many products. This may changes as more evidence surfaces showing its efficacy. I am personally going to look into the possibility of adding it into Acne.org products in the coming years.

References:

  • Shahmoradi Z, et al. “Comparison of topical 5% nicotinamid gel versus 2% clindamycin gel in the treatment of the mild-moderate acne vulgaris: A double-blinded randomized clinical trial.” Journal of Research in Medical Sciences. 2013; 18(2): 115–117.
  • Khodaeiani, et al. “Topical 4% nicotinamide vs. 1% clindamycin in moderate inflammatory acne vulgaris.” International Journal of Dermatology. 2013; 52(8): 999-1004.

One Response to “Nicotinamide – positive evidence mounts on this intriguing ingredient”

  • Edvinas

    So which nicotinomide gel would be better, 5% or 4% for facial acne?
    P.S i would use it with moisturizer or treatment.

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