Hey Everybody. Just a heads up to keep you all in the loop…we have been working on an upgrade to the messageboards for a few months now. It’s a huge job but we’re almost done. The new messageboard is now online and should be accessible for you, but keep in mind that it doesn’t have the look or feel that it ultimately will.  We will be working on sprucing everything up this week.  The new boards will have better navigation, search, members area…pretty much everything.  Plus it should be more integrated with social media and help everybody on here get to know each other better with upgraded tools.

Thanks for your patience, and please give me your feedback.  I know you will :)


What it is:  On June 21, 2011 the FDA approved a process by which a dermatologist or plastic surgeon numbs behind the ear, removes small pieces of skin, and sends these pieces of skin to a lab where the fibroblast cells in the skin samples are multiplied many times over and then frozen. These cells are then thawed when needed and injected into the skin under wrinkles or scars (boxcar or rolling) to help even out the appearance of the skin.

PROS: The body views these cultured cells as “own” and so the immune system does not respond. Working with your own cells eliminates allergic reactions, lumps, or abscesses which may come with other fillers. But probably the most compelling advantage is how long results last. Other fillers like bovine or synthetic collagen may last only a few months, and even more advanced fillers which combine polymer beads with collagen may only last a year or so. The LaViv treatment promises to last for years. As with many fillers, recovery is extremely minor and is evidenced by minor redness or bruising at the injection site. You can immediately return to work.

CONS: People don’t see results right away. The process requires 3 staggered injections and results aren’t seen until up to 3 months. It also costs a pretty penny–anywhere from $2000-$4000. However, other fillers which last less than a year can cost about $1000, so when you look at the long term, using your own cells may be more cost effective.

BOTTOM LINE: As always, the proof is in the pudding, and the pudding in this case is still cooking. This is such a new product and process that we literally haven’t had enough time to begin seeing “real” before and afters from everyday people posting online. There are 2 before and after pictures at this link which are provided by the company. Keep in mind as well that fillers are very often best used alongside other treatments, such as laser resurfacing.

A while back we switched to new pumps–pictured below on the right. You guys let me know they were kinda annoying and I agreed, so I switched back to the old pumps–pictured below on the left. From now on, if you order any Acne.org product with a pump, you will get the old, good pumps.

The last few days I have spent going through all clinical studies/trials regarding acne and Omega-3 fats, iodine, antioxidants, chocolate, calorie intake, fatty/oily food, digestion, and zinc. Adding to this what I have learned regarding dairy and glycemic load, I’m sorry to say that nothing stands out for me as a smoking gun when it comes to diet and acne. We simply don’t have enough research yet, and nothing feels super compelling to me at this point. However, at least researchers are looking into how diet may affect acne, so hopefully by the next time I review the literature, the evidence available to the scientific community will start taking shape. In the meantime, based on digesting everything the research community has to offer regarding diet and acne, here is what I am personally going to do as far as diet goes:

1.  Keep taking fish oil and eating wild delicious sushi :)  I take 4 fish oil pills per day to make up for my Western-style diet, which like almost everyone living in modern society, is overly rich in Omega-6 fats from vegetable oils, grains, etc. There is enough evidence to persuade me of the overall health benefits of Omega-3s and I feel good taking fish oil regardless of whether or not it may be helping with my skin. Also, when I go out to eat, I specifically ask whether the fish or sushi on the menu is wild. Farm raised seafood is far inferior in Omega-3s and other nutrition than wild seafood.

2.  Keep taking a zinc supplement. Having dived deeper into the role of zinc, I am still convinced that it is likely an important nutrient when it comes to combating inflammation and keeping bacteria in check. I’ll keep taking my 30mg per day.

3.  Not worry about iodine, chocolate, fatty/oily food. I’ll keep eating seaweed salad and seafood (contain iodine).  There exists no evidence showing that the amounts of iodine consumed in these foods is in any way detrimental for acne. Based on the available evidence, I’ll also continue eating a little dark chocolate every day without worrying about how my skin will react. I will also keep eating the occasional naughty greasy meal without fear.

4.  Try to be generally healthy. Antioxidants are important calming agents in the body, and eating antioxidant-rich colorful fruits and vegetables is fun and tasty anyway. When it comes to glycemic load, whether or not scientists know if it will help with acne yet, I’ll try to keep my meals balanced with carbs, fat, and protein to keep my energy and mood level and avoid crashes.

A full update to the diet and acne page of acne.org is on its way with much more information on each of the above mentioned topics. In the meantime, when you look at the evidence at hand, eating healthy and in moderation will suffice as a general wrap up for what we know regarding diet and acne at this point. Not exactly a Eureka moment.